Publication

Postoperative recovery of accelerometer-based physical activity in older cancer patients

Jonker, L. T., Hendriks, S., Lahr, M. M., van Munster, B. C., de Bock, G. H. & van Leeuwen, B. L., 24-Jun-2020, In : European Journal of Surgical Oncology.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

INTRODUCTION: Recovery of physical activity is an important functional outcome measure after cancer surgery. However, objective data on physical activity for older cancer patients is scarce. The aims of this study were to quantify perioperative physical activity levels, assess recovery of physical activity three months after surgery, and characterise patients who achieved recovery.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This observational cohort study analysed physical activity data collected from patients aged >65 who were scheduled for cancer surgery between May 2018 and July 2019. Perioperative daily step count was measured using a Fitbit device. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients who returned to (≥90% of) their preoperative (baseline) physical activity levels three months after surgery.

RESULTS: Fifty patients (mean age 73) were recruited, and available Fitbit data was analysed. Median daily step counts at baseline (n = 40), before hospital discharge (n = 40), and three months postoperative (n = 37) were 5,974 (IQR 4,250-7,922), 1,619 (IQR 920-2,839), and 4,674 (IQR 3,047-7,592), respectively. The 15/37 (41%) patients who had reached baseline levels three months after surgery seemed to have more preoperative self-reported physical activity, better anaesthesiologists' physical status classification, and fewer in-hospital complications compared to patients who had not, although the differences were statistically non-significant.

CONCLUSION: Perioperative physical activity was quantified for older cancer patients, and 41% returned to baseline levels within three months. Accelerometer-based physical activity provided a valuable outcome measure for postoperative physical recovery. Future studies using objective physical activity measures are needed to evaluate effects of interventional studies aimed at improving physical activity.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Surgical Oncology
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24-Jun-2020

ID: 130327994