Publication

Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries

Roofthooft, M. T. R., Bergman, K. A., Ebels, T., Bartelds, B., Berger, R. M. F. & Waterbolk, T., Apr-2007, In : Annals of thoracic surgery. 83, 4, p. 1446-1450 5 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Roofthooft, M. T. R., Bergman, K. A., Ebels, T., Bartelds, B., Berger, R. M. F., & Waterbolk, T. (2007). Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries. Annals of thoracic surgery, 83(4), 1446-1450. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.001

Author

Roofthooft, Marcus T. R. ; Bergman, Klasina A. ; Ebels, Tjark ; Bartelds, Beatrijs ; Berger, Rolf M. F. ; Waterbolk, T. / Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries. In: Annals of thoracic surgery. 2007 ; Vol. 83, No. 4. pp. 1446-1450.

Harvard

Roofthooft, MTR, Bergman, KA, Ebels, T, Bartelds, B, Berger, RMF & Waterbolk, T 2007, 'Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries', Annals of thoracic surgery, vol. 83, no. 4, pp. 1446-1450. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.001

Standard

Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries. / Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.; Bergman, Klasina A.; Ebels, Tjark; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Waterbolk, T.

In: Annals of thoracic surgery, Vol. 83, No. 4, 04.2007, p. 1446-1450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Roofthooft MTR, Bergman KA, Ebels T, Bartelds B, Berger RMF, Waterbolk T. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries. Annals of thoracic surgery. 2007 Apr;83(4):1446-1450. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.001


BibTeX

@article{a626547f01654c2b9f90cfa434e898d0,
title = "Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries",
abstract = "Background. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) in patients with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is reported to be a high-risk and often therapy-resistant condition, associated with a high mortality. However, data on its incidence and prognosis are scarce and originate mostly from the era before introduction of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy for PPHN.Methods. This is a retrospective study of consecutive newborns with TGA, admitted to a tertiary cardiac and neonatal intensive unit over a 10-year period. In this period, iNO therapy was available.Results. Fourteen out of 112 patients with TGA (12.5{\%}) presented with associated PPHN. The PPHN occurred more frequently in patients with TGA and intact ventricular septum (IVS) compared with those with TGA and ventricular septal defect (13 out of 83 patients versus one out of 29 patients, respectively; p = 0.06, Fisher exact test). Of those newborns, six presented with severe PPHN, whereas eight presented with mild-to-moderate PPHN. Despite currently available treatment modalities, including iNO, four out of 14 patients died before corrective surgical procedures were considered to be an option (TGA/PPHN preoperative mortality 28.6{\%}). These included three out of six patients (50{\%}) with severe PPHN and one out of eight (12.5{\%}) with mild-to-moderate PPHN.Conclusions. The combination of TGA with PPHN is a serious and often fatal condition. It may jeopardize the usually favorable outcome of newborns with TGA. Despite the introduction of iNO therapy, the combination of TGA and PPHN remains a condition with unacceptable high mortality (in our series). Additional treatment strategies need to be investigated.",
keywords = "CONGENITAL HEART-DISEASE, SWITCH OPERATION, EXPRESSION, OUTCOMES, VEGF",
author = "Roofthooft, {Marcus T. R.} and Bergman, {Klasina A.} and Tjark Ebels and Beatrijs Bartelds and Berger, {Rolf M. F.} and T Waterbolk",
year = "2007",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.001",
language = "English",
volume = "83",
pages = "1446--1450",
journal = "Annals of thoracic surgery",
issn = "0003-4975",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn with transposition of the great arteries

AU - Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.

AU - Bergman, Klasina A.

AU - Ebels, Tjark

AU - Bartelds, Beatrijs

AU - Berger, Rolf M. F.

AU - Waterbolk, T

PY - 2007/4

Y1 - 2007/4

N2 - Background. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) in patients with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is reported to be a high-risk and often therapy-resistant condition, associated with a high mortality. However, data on its incidence and prognosis are scarce and originate mostly from the era before introduction of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy for PPHN.Methods. This is a retrospective study of consecutive newborns with TGA, admitted to a tertiary cardiac and neonatal intensive unit over a 10-year period. In this period, iNO therapy was available.Results. Fourteen out of 112 patients with TGA (12.5%) presented with associated PPHN. The PPHN occurred more frequently in patients with TGA and intact ventricular septum (IVS) compared with those with TGA and ventricular septal defect (13 out of 83 patients versus one out of 29 patients, respectively; p = 0.06, Fisher exact test). Of those newborns, six presented with severe PPHN, whereas eight presented with mild-to-moderate PPHN. Despite currently available treatment modalities, including iNO, four out of 14 patients died before corrective surgical procedures were considered to be an option (TGA/PPHN preoperative mortality 28.6%). These included three out of six patients (50%) with severe PPHN and one out of eight (12.5%) with mild-to-moderate PPHN.Conclusions. The combination of TGA with PPHN is a serious and often fatal condition. It may jeopardize the usually favorable outcome of newborns with TGA. Despite the introduction of iNO therapy, the combination of TGA and PPHN remains a condition with unacceptable high mortality (in our series). Additional treatment strategies need to be investigated.

AB - Background. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) in patients with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) is reported to be a high-risk and often therapy-resistant condition, associated with a high mortality. However, data on its incidence and prognosis are scarce and originate mostly from the era before introduction of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) therapy for PPHN.Methods. This is a retrospective study of consecutive newborns with TGA, admitted to a tertiary cardiac and neonatal intensive unit over a 10-year period. In this period, iNO therapy was available.Results. Fourteen out of 112 patients with TGA (12.5%) presented with associated PPHN. The PPHN occurred more frequently in patients with TGA and intact ventricular septum (IVS) compared with those with TGA and ventricular septal defect (13 out of 83 patients versus one out of 29 patients, respectively; p = 0.06, Fisher exact test). Of those newborns, six presented with severe PPHN, whereas eight presented with mild-to-moderate PPHN. Despite currently available treatment modalities, including iNO, four out of 14 patients died before corrective surgical procedures were considered to be an option (TGA/PPHN preoperative mortality 28.6%). These included three out of six patients (50%) with severe PPHN and one out of eight (12.5%) with mild-to-moderate PPHN.Conclusions. The combination of TGA with PPHN is a serious and often fatal condition. It may jeopardize the usually favorable outcome of newborns with TGA. Despite the introduction of iNO therapy, the combination of TGA and PPHN remains a condition with unacceptable high mortality (in our series). Additional treatment strategies need to be investigated.

KW - CONGENITAL HEART-DISEASE

KW - SWITCH OPERATION

KW - EXPRESSION

KW - OUTCOMES

KW - VEGF

U2 - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.001

DO - 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2006.11.001

M3 - Article

VL - 83

SP - 1446

EP - 1450

JO - Annals of thoracic surgery

JF - Annals of thoracic surgery

SN - 0003-4975

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 4544100