Publication

Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success

Both, C., Dingemanse, NJ., Drent, PJ., Tinbergen, JM. & Drent, P. J., Jul-2005, In : Journal of Animal Ecology. 74, 4, p. 667-674 8 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Both, C., Dingemanse, NJ., Drent, PJ., Tinbergen, JM., & Drent, P. J. (2005). Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success. Journal of Animal Ecology, 74(4), 667-674. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00962.x

Author

Both, C ; Dingemanse, NJ ; Drent, PJ ; Tinbergen, JM ; Drent, Piet J. / Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success. In: Journal of Animal Ecology. 2005 ; Vol. 74, No. 4. pp. 667-674.

Harvard

Both, C, Dingemanse, NJ, Drent, PJ, Tinbergen, JM & Drent, PJ 2005, 'Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success' Journal of Animal Ecology, vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 667-674. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00962.x

Standard

Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success. / Both, C; Dingemanse, NJ; Drent, PJ; Tinbergen, JM; Drent, Piet J.

In: Journal of Animal Ecology, Vol. 74, No. 4, 07.2005, p. 667-674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Both C, Dingemanse NJ, Drent PJ, Tinbergen JM, Drent PJ. Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success. Journal of Animal Ecology. 2005 Jul;74(4):667-674. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00962.x


BibTeX

@article{43c8bffad6f04525bec8c092c857cf0a,
title = "Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success",
abstract = "1. Intraspecific variation in reproductive decisions is generally considered as a reaction to environmental circumstances. We show that variation in reproductive parameters also covaries with intraspecific variation in personality.2. During 4 years, we studied reproductive parameters in a natural population of great tits in association with a personality trait: exploratory behaviour as measured in a novel environment.3. Nest success, fledgling size and condition were all correlated with this personality trait. Slow-exploring females had a higher nest success and largest fledglings. Fledgling condition was affected by the interaction between male and female exploratory behaviour, with assortative pairs at both ends of the behavioural spectrum producing fledglings in best condition. Fast-exploring males bred in nestboxes that produced heavy fledglings in other years.4. We hypothesize that fast-exploring individuals are better able in defending or obtaining a high quality territory, while slow-exploring individuals are either better parents or have better chicks which may, in part, explain the patterns in reproductive success. We discuss how these patterns in reproduction can explain earlier reported relationships between offspring recruitment and avian personality and may result in the maintenance of intraspecific genetic variation in personality.",
keywords = "boldness, exploration, fitness, genetic variation, personality, reproduction, TIT PARUS-MAJOR, CONSISTENT INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, MALE GREAT TITS, EXPLORATORY-BEHAVIOR, HERITABILITY, DOMINANCE, ANIMALS, STRATEGIES, SHYNESS, FITNESS",
author = "C Both and NJ Dingemanse and PJ Drent and JM Tinbergen and Drent, {Piet J.}",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00962.x",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "667--674",
journal = "Journal of Animal Ecology",
issn = "1365-2656",
publisher = "WILEY",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pairs of extreme avian personalities have highest reproductive success

AU - Both, C

AU - Dingemanse, NJ

AU - Drent, PJ

AU - Tinbergen, JM

AU - Drent, Piet J.

PY - 2005/7

Y1 - 2005/7

N2 - 1. Intraspecific variation in reproductive decisions is generally considered as a reaction to environmental circumstances. We show that variation in reproductive parameters also covaries with intraspecific variation in personality.2. During 4 years, we studied reproductive parameters in a natural population of great tits in association with a personality trait: exploratory behaviour as measured in a novel environment.3. Nest success, fledgling size and condition were all correlated with this personality trait. Slow-exploring females had a higher nest success and largest fledglings. Fledgling condition was affected by the interaction between male and female exploratory behaviour, with assortative pairs at both ends of the behavioural spectrum producing fledglings in best condition. Fast-exploring males bred in nestboxes that produced heavy fledglings in other years.4. We hypothesize that fast-exploring individuals are better able in defending or obtaining a high quality territory, while slow-exploring individuals are either better parents or have better chicks which may, in part, explain the patterns in reproductive success. We discuss how these patterns in reproduction can explain earlier reported relationships between offspring recruitment and avian personality and may result in the maintenance of intraspecific genetic variation in personality.

AB - 1. Intraspecific variation in reproductive decisions is generally considered as a reaction to environmental circumstances. We show that variation in reproductive parameters also covaries with intraspecific variation in personality.2. During 4 years, we studied reproductive parameters in a natural population of great tits in association with a personality trait: exploratory behaviour as measured in a novel environment.3. Nest success, fledgling size and condition were all correlated with this personality trait. Slow-exploring females had a higher nest success and largest fledglings. Fledgling condition was affected by the interaction between male and female exploratory behaviour, with assortative pairs at both ends of the behavioural spectrum producing fledglings in best condition. Fast-exploring males bred in nestboxes that produced heavy fledglings in other years.4. We hypothesize that fast-exploring individuals are better able in defending or obtaining a high quality territory, while slow-exploring individuals are either better parents or have better chicks which may, in part, explain the patterns in reproductive success. We discuss how these patterns in reproduction can explain earlier reported relationships between offspring recruitment and avian personality and may result in the maintenance of intraspecific genetic variation in personality.

KW - boldness

KW - exploration

KW - fitness

KW - genetic variation

KW - personality

KW - reproduction

KW - TIT PARUS-MAJOR

KW - CONSISTENT INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES

KW - MALE GREAT TITS

KW - EXPLORATORY-BEHAVIOR

KW - HERITABILITY

KW - DOMINANCE

KW - ANIMALS

KW - STRATEGIES

KW - SHYNESS

KW - FITNESS

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00962.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00962.x

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 667

EP - 674

JO - Journal of Animal Ecology

JF - Journal of Animal Ecology

SN - 1365-2656

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 4348772