Publication

Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder

Althaus, M., Groen, Y., Wijers, A. A., Noltes, H., Tucha, O. & Hoekstra, P. J., 2015, In : Neuropsychologia. 79, Part A, p. 53-69 17 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Althaus, M., Groen, Y., Wijers, A. A., Noltes, H., Tucha, O., & Hoekstra, P. J. (2015). Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder. Neuropsychologia, 79(Part A), 53-69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.10.025

Author

Althaus, M. ; Groen, Y. ; Wijers, A. A. ; Noltes, H. ; Tucha, O. ; Hoekstra, P. J. / Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder. In: Neuropsychologia. 2015 ; Vol. 79, No. Part A. pp. 53-69.

Harvard

Althaus, M, Groen, Y, Wijers, AA, Noltes, H, Tucha, O & Hoekstra, PJ 2015, 'Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder', Neuropsychologia, vol. 79, no. Part A, pp. 53-69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.10.025

Standard

Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder. / Althaus, M.; Groen, Y.; Wijers, A. A.; Noltes, H.; Tucha, O.; Hoekstra, P. J.

In: Neuropsychologia, Vol. 79, No. Part A, 2015, p. 53-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Althaus M, Groen Y, Wijers AA, Noltes H, Tucha O, Hoekstra PJ. Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder. Neuropsychologia. 2015;79(Part A):53-69. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.10.025


BibTeX

@article{a4fcd0d67be349c4a069efc119be7949,
title = "Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder",
abstract = "Objective: The study investigated the effects of nasally administered oxytocin on neurophysiological orienting to empathy-evoking pictures in normally intelligent male adults with and without an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It further investigated whether these effects might be moderated by the individual's approach and avoidance tendencies.Methods: All subjects participated in a randomised double-blind placebo controlled crossover trial where either oxytocin (OXT) or placebo was administered preceding the viewing of affective pictures.The pictures, selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), represented a systematic variation of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. Both cardiac (ECR) and cortical (LPP) evoked orienting responses were measured and both were enhanced for the pictures with humans, in particular for the unpleasant ones.Results: No significant group differences were found, nor were there any treatment effects. Moderator analysis, however, demonstrated that OXT did enhance orienting to affective pictures with humansin male adults with ASD who are easily distressed when seeing others in stressful situations and in healthy males who are highly sensitive to anticipated punishment and criticism or have a low drive for goal achievement.Conclusion: Individual differences in stress-related avoidance tendencies should be taken into account when considering OXT as a treatment of social deficiencies in autism. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Autism spectrum disorder, Oxytocin, Affective empathy, Neurophysiological orienting, Effect moderators, NORMAL SEX-DIFFERENCES, MALE BRAIN THEORY, SYSTEMATIZING QUOTIENT, ASPERGER-SYNDROME, EMOTIONAL EMPATHY, HEART-RATE, HUMANS, RESPONSES, AQ, MECHANISMS",
author = "M. Althaus and Y. Groen and Wijers, {A. A.} and H. Noltes and O. Tucha and Hoekstra, {P. J.}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.10.025",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "53--69",
journal = "Neuropsychologia",
issn = "0028-3932",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",
number = "Part A",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder

AU - Althaus, M.

AU - Groen, Y.

AU - Wijers, A. A.

AU - Noltes, H.

AU - Tucha, O.

AU - Hoekstra, P. J.

N1 - Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Objective: The study investigated the effects of nasally administered oxytocin on neurophysiological orienting to empathy-evoking pictures in normally intelligent male adults with and without an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It further investigated whether these effects might be moderated by the individual's approach and avoidance tendencies.Methods: All subjects participated in a randomised double-blind placebo controlled crossover trial where either oxytocin (OXT) or placebo was administered preceding the viewing of affective pictures.The pictures, selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), represented a systematic variation of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. Both cardiac (ECR) and cortical (LPP) evoked orienting responses were measured and both were enhanced for the pictures with humans, in particular for the unpleasant ones.Results: No significant group differences were found, nor were there any treatment effects. Moderator analysis, however, demonstrated that OXT did enhance orienting to affective pictures with humansin male adults with ASD who are easily distressed when seeing others in stressful situations and in healthy males who are highly sensitive to anticipated punishment and criticism or have a low drive for goal achievement.Conclusion: Individual differences in stress-related avoidance tendencies should be taken into account when considering OXT as a treatment of social deficiencies in autism. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Objective: The study investigated the effects of nasally administered oxytocin on neurophysiological orienting to empathy-evoking pictures in normally intelligent male adults with and without an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It further investigated whether these effects might be moderated by the individual's approach and avoidance tendencies.Methods: All subjects participated in a randomised double-blind placebo controlled crossover trial where either oxytocin (OXT) or placebo was administered preceding the viewing of affective pictures.The pictures, selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), represented a systematic variation of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. Both cardiac (ECR) and cortical (LPP) evoked orienting responses were measured and both were enhanced for the pictures with humans, in particular for the unpleasant ones.Results: No significant group differences were found, nor were there any treatment effects. Moderator analysis, however, demonstrated that OXT did enhance orienting to affective pictures with humansin male adults with ASD who are easily distressed when seeing others in stressful situations and in healthy males who are highly sensitive to anticipated punishment and criticism or have a low drive for goal achievement.Conclusion: Individual differences in stress-related avoidance tendencies should be taken into account when considering OXT as a treatment of social deficiencies in autism. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Autism spectrum disorder

KW - Oxytocin

KW - Affective empathy

KW - Neurophysiological orienting

KW - Effect moderators

KW - NORMAL SEX-DIFFERENCES

KW - MALE BRAIN THEORY

KW - SYSTEMATIZING QUOTIENT

KW - ASPERGER-SYNDROME

KW - EMOTIONAL EMPATHY

KW - HEART-RATE

KW - HUMANS

KW - RESPONSES

KW - AQ

KW - MECHANISMS

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.10.025

DO - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.10.025

M3 - Article

VL - 79

SP - 53

EP - 69

JO - Neuropsychologia

JF - Neuropsychologia

SN - 0028-3932

IS - Part A

ER -

ID: 25351487