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On the exceptionality of reported speech

Maier, E., 27-May-2019, In : Linguistic Typology. 23, 1, p. 197-205 9 p.

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Spronck and Nikitina (S&N) have taken on the task of defining a linguistic phenomenon that has managed to elude definition, despite playing a key role in many subfields of linguistics. In formal semantics in particular, speech reports have been at the center of attention from the very beginning (Frege, 1892). S&N’s endeavor presupposes that there is something worth defining, i.e. that reported speech is indeed a linguistic category of its own, not an arbitrary intersection of various other, larger linguistic categories such as clausal embedding and evidentiality. In this response I want to provide additional, semantic evidence for S&N’s claim that reported speech should be treated as a linguistic category.Spronck and Nikitina (S&N) have taken on the task of defining a linguistic phenomenon that has managed to elude definition, despite playing a key role in many subfields of linguistics. In formal semantics in particular, speech reports have been at the center of attention from the very beginning (Frege, 1892). S&N’s endeavor presupposes that there is something worth defining, i.e. that reported speech is indeed a linguistic category of its own, not an arbitrary intersection of various other, larger linguistic categories such as clausal embedding and evidentiality. In this response I want to provide additional, semantic evidence for S&N’s claim that reported speech should be treated as a linguistic category.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)197-205
Number of pages9
JournalLinguistic Typology
Volume23
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 27-May-2019

ID: 99518884