Publication

Obesity and Depression: An Intertwined Public Health Challenge

Nigatu, Y. T. 2015 [Groningen]: University of Groningen. 181 p.

Research output: ThesisThesis fully internal (DIV)

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Documents

  • Title and contents

    Final publisher's version, 349 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 1

    Final publisher's version, 432 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 2

    Final publisher's version, 498 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 3

    Final publisher's version, 500 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 4

    Final publisher's version, 566 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 5

    Final publisher's version, 541 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 6

    Final publisher's version, 718 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 7

    Final publisher's version, 483 KB, PDF-document

  • Chapter 8

    Final publisher's version, 522 KB, PDF-document

  • Complete thesis

    Final publisher's version, 1 MB, PDF-document

  • Propositions

    Final publisher's version, 337 KB, PDF-document

  • Yeshambel Tesfa Nigatu
Obesity and depression are widespread public health problems. Both problems often coexist, and can affect an individual’s health and productivity. We examine in this thesis the prospective association between obesity and depression, and their separate and combined effects on work and health outcomes.
We found that obesity and depression are inter-related, and the combined effect of obesity and depression on work and health outcomes is fairly larger than that of either condition alone, which implies that obesity and depression reinforce each others effects. The economic costs associated with obesity and depression are high; both the direct costs in terms of health care use (such as physician visits and hospitalizations); and the indirect costs, in terms of long-term sickness absence and work performance impairment.
In our study, we clearly showed that persons with obesity and depression use more health care resources than persons with obesity alone or depression alone. This suggests that the co-occurrence of the conditions has major direct implications on costs of healthcare and may explain some of the observed increases in total healthcare costs.
We also showed that persons with obesity and depression have a higher work performance impairment than those persons with obesity or depression alone. This suggests that obesity and depression indeed reinforce each others effects, which may substantially increase societal costs in terms of poor work productivity and well-being. Intervening on obesity may be more beneficial for individuals with major depression than for those without major depression regarding the risk of adverse work and health outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Bultmann, Ute, Supervisor
  • Reijneveld, Menno, Supervisor
  • Bongers, Paulien M., Assessment committee, External person
  • Navis, Gerarda, Assessment committee
  • van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M., Assessment committee, External person
Award date25-Nov-2015
Place of Publication[Groningen]
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-90-367-8170-1
Electronic ISBNs978-90-367-8169-5
StatePublished - 2015
Related Datasets
  1. Lifelines Biobank

    Bakker, S. (Creator), Dotinga, A. (Creator), Vonk, J. (Creator), Smidt, N. (Creator), Scholtens, S. (Creator), Swertz, M. (Creator), Wijmenga, C. (Creator), Wolffenbuttel, B. (Creator), Stolk, R. (Creator), Zon, van, S. (Creator), Rosmalen, J. (Creator), Postma, D. S. (Creator), Boer, de, R. (Creator), Navis, G. (Creator), Slaets, J. (Creator), Ormel, J. (Creator), Dijk, van, F. (Creator), Lifelines, 2006

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