Publication

Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss: Asystematic review and meta-analysis

Carriere, K., Khoury, B., Gunak, M. M. & Knauper, B., Feb-2018, In : Obesity Reviews. 19, 2, p. 164-177 14 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Carriere, K., Khoury, B., Gunak, M. M., & Knauper, B. (2018). Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss: Asystematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews, 19(2), 164-177. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12623

Author

Carriere, K. ; Khoury, B. ; Gunak, M. M. ; Knauper, B. / Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss : Asystematic review and meta-analysis. In: Obesity Reviews. 2018 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 164-177.

Harvard

Carriere, K, Khoury, B, Gunak, MM & Knauper, B 2018, 'Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss: Asystematic review and meta-analysis', Obesity Reviews, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 164-177. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12623

Standard

Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss : Asystematic review and meta-analysis. / Carriere, K.; Khoury, B.; Gunak, M. M.; Knauper, B.

In: Obesity Reviews, Vol. 19, No. 2, 02.2018, p. 164-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Carriere K, Khoury B, Gunak MM, Knauper B. Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss: Asystematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews. 2018 Feb;19(2):164-177. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12623


BibTeX

@article{4c515bcc52ae489caa49bd4d8cd508da,
title = "Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss: Asystematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background: An increasing number of studies are investigating the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for weight loss and obesity-related eating behaviours. However, the results of past reviews are inconsistent.Objective: To clarify these inconsistencies, we conducted a comprehensive effect-size analysis to evaluate the efficacy of MBIs on weight loss and eating behaviours.Data source: Data sources were identified through a systematic review of studies published in journals or as dissertations in PsychINFO, PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Medline and Scopus, ProQuest or OATD from the first available date to March 10, 2017.Review methods: A total of 18 publications (19 studies, n = 1,160) were included.Results: Mean weight loss for MBIs at post-treatment was 6.8 and 7.5 lb at follow-up. In pre-post comparisons, effect-size estimates suggest that MBIs are moderately effective for weight loss (n = 16; Hedge's g = .42; 95% CI [.26, .59], p <.000001) and largely effective in reducing obesity-related eating behaviours (n = 10; Hedge's g = .70; CI 95% [.36, 1.04], p <.00005). Larger effects on weight loss were found in studies that used a combination of informal and formal meditation practice (n = 6; Hedge's g = .55; CI 95% [.32, .77], p <.00001) compared with formal meditation practice alone (n = 4; Hedge's g = .46; CI [.10, .83], p <.05).Conclusion: Results suggest that MBIs are effective in reducing weight and improving obesity-related eating behaviours among individuals with overweight and obesity. Further research is needed to examine their efficacy for weight loss maintenance.",
keywords = "Meta-analysis, mindfulness, weight loss, COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION, EATING INTERVENTION, FOLLOW-UP, LOSS MAINTENANCE, CLINICAL-TRIALS, SELF-COMPASSION, OBESE WOMEN, OVERWEIGHT, MANAGEMENT, OUTCOMES",
author = "K. Carriere and B. Khoury and Gunak, {M. M.} and B. Knauper",
year = "2018",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1111/obr.12623",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "164--177",
journal = "Obesity Reviews",
issn = "1467-7881",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mindfulness-based interventions for weight loss

T2 - Asystematic review and meta-analysis

AU - Carriere, K.

AU - Khoury, B.

AU - Gunak, M. M.

AU - Knauper, B.

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - Background: An increasing number of studies are investigating the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for weight loss and obesity-related eating behaviours. However, the results of past reviews are inconsistent.Objective: To clarify these inconsistencies, we conducted a comprehensive effect-size analysis to evaluate the efficacy of MBIs on weight loss and eating behaviours.Data source: Data sources were identified through a systematic review of studies published in journals or as dissertations in PsychINFO, PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Medline and Scopus, ProQuest or OATD from the first available date to March 10, 2017.Review methods: A total of 18 publications (19 studies, n = 1,160) were included.Results: Mean weight loss for MBIs at post-treatment was 6.8 and 7.5 lb at follow-up. In pre-post comparisons, effect-size estimates suggest that MBIs are moderately effective for weight loss (n = 16; Hedge's g = .42; 95% CI [.26, .59], p <.000001) and largely effective in reducing obesity-related eating behaviours (n = 10; Hedge's g = .70; CI 95% [.36, 1.04], p <.00005). Larger effects on weight loss were found in studies that used a combination of informal and formal meditation practice (n = 6; Hedge's g = .55; CI 95% [.32, .77], p <.00001) compared with formal meditation practice alone (n = 4; Hedge's g = .46; CI [.10, .83], p <.05).Conclusion: Results suggest that MBIs are effective in reducing weight and improving obesity-related eating behaviours among individuals with overweight and obesity. Further research is needed to examine their efficacy for weight loss maintenance.

AB - Background: An increasing number of studies are investigating the efficacy of mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) for weight loss and obesity-related eating behaviours. However, the results of past reviews are inconsistent.Objective: To clarify these inconsistencies, we conducted a comprehensive effect-size analysis to evaluate the efficacy of MBIs on weight loss and eating behaviours.Data source: Data sources were identified through a systematic review of studies published in journals or as dissertations in PsychINFO, PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, Medline and Scopus, ProQuest or OATD from the first available date to March 10, 2017.Review methods: A total of 18 publications (19 studies, n = 1,160) were included.Results: Mean weight loss for MBIs at post-treatment was 6.8 and 7.5 lb at follow-up. In pre-post comparisons, effect-size estimates suggest that MBIs are moderately effective for weight loss (n = 16; Hedge's g = .42; 95% CI [.26, .59], p <.000001) and largely effective in reducing obesity-related eating behaviours (n = 10; Hedge's g = .70; CI 95% [.36, 1.04], p <.00005). Larger effects on weight loss were found in studies that used a combination of informal and formal meditation practice (n = 6; Hedge's g = .55; CI 95% [.32, .77], p <.00001) compared with formal meditation practice alone (n = 4; Hedge's g = .46; CI [.10, .83], p <.05).Conclusion: Results suggest that MBIs are effective in reducing weight and improving obesity-related eating behaviours among individuals with overweight and obesity. Further research is needed to examine their efficacy for weight loss maintenance.

KW - Meta-analysis

KW - mindfulness

KW - weight loss

KW - COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION

KW - EATING INTERVENTION

KW - FOLLOW-UP

KW - LOSS MAINTENANCE

KW - CLINICAL-TRIALS

KW - SELF-COMPASSION

KW - OBESE WOMEN

KW - OVERWEIGHT

KW - MANAGEMENT

KW - OUTCOMES

U2 - 10.1111/obr.12623

DO - 10.1111/obr.12623

M3 - Review article

VL - 19

SP - 164

EP - 177

JO - Obesity Reviews

JF - Obesity Reviews

SN - 1467-7881

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 77507808