Publication

Mindfulness, job stress and irrational beliefs

Dijkstra, P., Barelds, D. P. H. & Hoeneveld, A., Jun-2017, In : Gedrag & Organisatie. 30, 2, p. 123-141 19 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

The aim of this study was to examine the relations between mindfulness on the one hand and two types of job stress general job stress and telepressure and five types of irrational beliefs on the other hand. It was expected that mindfulness would negatively relate to both types of job stress (Hypothesis 1) and irrational beliefs (Hypothesis 3), that both types of job stress would be positively related to irrational beliefs (Hypothese 2), and that the relationship between mindfulness and the two types of job stress would be mediated by irrational beliefs (Hypothesis 4). To test these hypotheses, 195 employees at a large insurance company filled out an online questionnaire. Results largely confirmed Hypotheses 1, 2 and 3. Mediation analyses conducted to test Hypotheses 4 found that the effect of mindfulness on general job stress was mediated by the irrational 'rumination' belief, and that the effect of mindfulness on telepressure was mediated by the irrational 'need for approval' belief. The study's results suggest that mindfulness interventions may contribute to improving the management of work-related stress and, thereby, to the sustainable employability of employees.

Original languageDutch
Pages (from-to)123-141
Number of pages19
JournalGedrag & Organisatie
Volume30
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun-2017

    Keywords

  • job stress, mindfulness, irrational beliefs, WORKPLACE, MEDITATION, DEPRESSION, INTERVENTION, NEUROTICISM, VALIDATION, MANAGEMENT, RUMINATION, THERAPY, BURNOUT

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