Publication

MILiMAC: Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks

Sikorski, J., Mohanty, S. & Misra, S., Oct-2020, In : IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters. 5, 4, p. 5260-5267 8 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterAcademicpeer-review

APA

Sikorski, J., Mohanty, S., & Misra, S. (2020). MILiMAC: Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks. IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, 5(4), 5260-5267. https://doi.org/10.1109/LRA.2020.3004323

Author

Sikorski, Jakub ; Mohanty, Sumit ; Misra, Sarthak. / MILiMAC : Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks. In: IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters. 2020 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 5260-5267.

Harvard

Sikorski, J, Mohanty, S & Misra, S 2020, 'MILiMAC: Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks', IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 5260-5267. https://doi.org/10.1109/LRA.2020.3004323

Standard

MILiMAC : Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks. / Sikorski, Jakub; Mohanty, Sumit; Misra, Sarthak.

In: IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters, Vol. 5, No. 4, 10.2020, p. 5260-5267.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Sikorski J, Mohanty S, Misra S. MILiMAC: Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks. IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters. 2020 Oct;5(4):5260-5267. https://doi.org/10.1109/LRA.2020.3004323


BibTeX

@article{d5b12227c3594db3b987c27c2250e675,
title = "MILiMAC: Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks",
abstract = "Advancements in medical microrobotics have given rise to an abundance of agents capable of localised interaction with human body in small scales. Nevertheless, clinically-relevant applications of this technology are still limited by the auxiliary infrastructure required for actuation of micro-agents. In this letter, we approach this challenge. Using finite-element analysis, we show that miniaturization of electromagnets can be used to create systems capable of providing magnetic forces adequate for micro-agent steering, while retaining small footprint and power consumption. We use these observations to create MILiMAC (Microrobotic Infrastructure Loaded into Magnetically-Actuated Catheter). MILiMAC is a flexible catheter employing three miniaturized electromagnets to provide localized magnetic actuation at the deeply-seated microsurgery site. We test our approach in a proof-of-concept study deploying MILiMAC inside a test platform to deliver and steer a 600 [mu m] ferromagnetic microbead. The bead is steered along a set of user-defined trajectories using closed-loop position control. Across all trajectories the best performance metrics are the mean error of 0.41 [mm] and the steady-state error of 0.27 [mm].",
keywords = "Medical robots and systems, micro/nano robots",
author = "Jakub Sikorski and Sumit Mohanty and Sarthak Misra",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1109/LRA.2020.3004323",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "5260--5267",
journal = "IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters",
issn = "2377-3766",
publisher = "IEEE-INST ELECTRICAL ELECTRONICS ENGINEERS INC",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - MILiMAC

T2 - Flexible Catheter With Miniaturized Electromagnets as a Small-Footprint System for Microrobotic Tasks

AU - Sikorski, Jakub

AU - Mohanty, Sumit

AU - Misra, Sarthak

PY - 2020/10

Y1 - 2020/10

N2 - Advancements in medical microrobotics have given rise to an abundance of agents capable of localised interaction with human body in small scales. Nevertheless, clinically-relevant applications of this technology are still limited by the auxiliary infrastructure required for actuation of micro-agents. In this letter, we approach this challenge. Using finite-element analysis, we show that miniaturization of electromagnets can be used to create systems capable of providing magnetic forces adequate for micro-agent steering, while retaining small footprint and power consumption. We use these observations to create MILiMAC (Microrobotic Infrastructure Loaded into Magnetically-Actuated Catheter). MILiMAC is a flexible catheter employing three miniaturized electromagnets to provide localized magnetic actuation at the deeply-seated microsurgery site. We test our approach in a proof-of-concept study deploying MILiMAC inside a test platform to deliver and steer a 600 [mu m] ferromagnetic microbead. The bead is steered along a set of user-defined trajectories using closed-loop position control. Across all trajectories the best performance metrics are the mean error of 0.41 [mm] and the steady-state error of 0.27 [mm].

AB - Advancements in medical microrobotics have given rise to an abundance of agents capable of localised interaction with human body in small scales. Nevertheless, clinically-relevant applications of this technology are still limited by the auxiliary infrastructure required for actuation of micro-agents. In this letter, we approach this challenge. Using finite-element analysis, we show that miniaturization of electromagnets can be used to create systems capable of providing magnetic forces adequate for micro-agent steering, while retaining small footprint and power consumption. We use these observations to create MILiMAC (Microrobotic Infrastructure Loaded into Magnetically-Actuated Catheter). MILiMAC is a flexible catheter employing three miniaturized electromagnets to provide localized magnetic actuation at the deeply-seated microsurgery site. We test our approach in a proof-of-concept study deploying MILiMAC inside a test platform to deliver and steer a 600 [mu m] ferromagnetic microbead. The bead is steered along a set of user-defined trajectories using closed-loop position control. Across all trajectories the best performance metrics are the mean error of 0.41 [mm] and the steady-state error of 0.27 [mm].

KW - Medical robots and systems

KW - micro/nano robots

U2 - 10.1109/LRA.2020.3004323

DO - 10.1109/LRA.2020.3004323

M3 - Letter

VL - 5

SP - 5260

EP - 5267

JO - IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters

JF - IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters

SN - 2377-3766

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 131005835