Publication

Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function: Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm

Georgiadis, J. R., Reinders, A. A. T. S., Paans, A. M. J., Renken, R. & Kortekaas, R., Oct-2009, In : Human brain mapping. 30, 10, p. 3089-3101 13 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Georgiadis, J. R., Reinders, A. A. T. S., Paans, A. M. J., Renken, R., & Kortekaas, R. (2009). Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function: Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm. Human brain mapping, 30(10), 3089-3101. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.20733

Author

Georgiadis, Janniko R. ; Reinders, A. A. T. Simone ; Paans, Anne M. J. ; Renken, Remco ; Kortekaas, Rudie. / Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function : Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm. In: Human brain mapping. 2009 ; Vol. 30, No. 10. pp. 3089-3101.

Harvard

Georgiadis, JR, Reinders, AATS, Paans, AMJ, Renken, R & Kortekaas, R 2009, 'Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function: Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm', Human brain mapping, vol. 30, no. 10, pp. 3089-3101. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.20733

Standard

Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function : Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm. / Georgiadis, Janniko R.; Reinders, A. A. T. Simone; Paans, Anne M. J.; Renken, Remco; Kortekaas, Rudie.

In: Human brain mapping, Vol. 30, No. 10, 10.2009, p. 3089-3101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Georgiadis JR, Reinders AATS, Paans AMJ, Renken R, Kortekaas R. Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function: Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm. Human brain mapping. 2009 Oct;30(10):3089-3101. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.20733


BibTeX

@article{1712c528446143a59a91edb9ff62e137,
title = "Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function: Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm",
abstract = "Biological differences in male and female sexuality are obvious in the behavioral domain, but the central mechanisms that might explain these behavioral gender differences remain unclear. In this study, we merged two earlier positron emission tomography data sets to enable systematic comparison of the brain responses in heterosexual men and women during sexual tactile genital (penile and clitoral) stimulation and during orgasm. Gender commonalities were most evident during orgasm, a phase which demonstrated activations in the anterior lobe of the cerebellar vermis and deep cerebellar nuclei, and deactivations in the left ventromedial and orbitofrontal cortex in both men and women. During tactile genital stimulation, deactivations in the right amygdala and left fusiform gyrus were found for both genders. Marked gender differences were seen during this phase: left fronto-parietal areas (motor cortices, somatosensory area 2 and posterior parietal cortex) were activated more in women, whereas in men, the right claustrum and ventral occipitotemporal cortex showed larger activation. The only prominent gender difference during orgasm was male-biased activation of the periaqueductal gray matter. From these results, we conclude that during the sexual act, differential brain responses across genders are principally related to the stimulatory (plateau) phase and not to the orgasmic phase itself. These results add to a better understanding of the neural underpinnings of human sexuality, which might benefit treatment of psychosexual disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 30:3089-3101, 2009. (C) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.",
keywords = "gender, orgasm, genitalia, PET, HUMAN ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX, FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE-BEHAVIOR, MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX, HUMAN MALE EJACULATION, CEREBRAL-BLOOD-FLOW, FOS-IMMUNOREACTIVITY, PSEUDORABIES VIRUS, EXTENDED AMYGDALA, TALAIRACH ATLAS, FILM EXCERPTS",
author = "Georgiadis, {Janniko R.} and Reinders, {A. A. T. Simone} and Paans, {Anne M. J.} and Remco Renken and Rudie Kortekaas",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1002/hbm.20733",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "3089--3101",
journal = "Human brain mapping",
issn = "1065-9471",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Men Versus Women on Sexual Brain Function

T2 - Prominent Differences During Tactile Genital Stimulation, but not During Orgasm

AU - Georgiadis, Janniko R.

AU - Reinders, A. A. T. Simone

AU - Paans, Anne M. J.

AU - Renken, Remco

AU - Kortekaas, Rudie

PY - 2009/10

Y1 - 2009/10

N2 - Biological differences in male and female sexuality are obvious in the behavioral domain, but the central mechanisms that might explain these behavioral gender differences remain unclear. In this study, we merged two earlier positron emission tomography data sets to enable systematic comparison of the brain responses in heterosexual men and women during sexual tactile genital (penile and clitoral) stimulation and during orgasm. Gender commonalities were most evident during orgasm, a phase which demonstrated activations in the anterior lobe of the cerebellar vermis and deep cerebellar nuclei, and deactivations in the left ventromedial and orbitofrontal cortex in both men and women. During tactile genital stimulation, deactivations in the right amygdala and left fusiform gyrus were found for both genders. Marked gender differences were seen during this phase: left fronto-parietal areas (motor cortices, somatosensory area 2 and posterior parietal cortex) were activated more in women, whereas in men, the right claustrum and ventral occipitotemporal cortex showed larger activation. The only prominent gender difference during orgasm was male-biased activation of the periaqueductal gray matter. From these results, we conclude that during the sexual act, differential brain responses across genders are principally related to the stimulatory (plateau) phase and not to the orgasmic phase itself. These results add to a better understanding of the neural underpinnings of human sexuality, which might benefit treatment of psychosexual disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 30:3089-3101, 2009. (C) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

AB - Biological differences in male and female sexuality are obvious in the behavioral domain, but the central mechanisms that might explain these behavioral gender differences remain unclear. In this study, we merged two earlier positron emission tomography data sets to enable systematic comparison of the brain responses in heterosexual men and women during sexual tactile genital (penile and clitoral) stimulation and during orgasm. Gender commonalities were most evident during orgasm, a phase which demonstrated activations in the anterior lobe of the cerebellar vermis and deep cerebellar nuclei, and deactivations in the left ventromedial and orbitofrontal cortex in both men and women. During tactile genital stimulation, deactivations in the right amygdala and left fusiform gyrus were found for both genders. Marked gender differences were seen during this phase: left fronto-parietal areas (motor cortices, somatosensory area 2 and posterior parietal cortex) were activated more in women, whereas in men, the right claustrum and ventral occipitotemporal cortex showed larger activation. The only prominent gender difference during orgasm was male-biased activation of the periaqueductal gray matter. From these results, we conclude that during the sexual act, differential brain responses across genders are principally related to the stimulatory (plateau) phase and not to the orgasmic phase itself. These results add to a better understanding of the neural underpinnings of human sexuality, which might benefit treatment of psychosexual disorders. Hum Brain Mapp 30:3089-3101, 2009. (C) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

KW - gender

KW - orgasm

KW - genitalia

KW - PET

KW - HUMAN ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX

KW - FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE-BEHAVIOR

KW - MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

KW - HUMAN MALE EJACULATION

KW - CEREBRAL-BLOOD-FLOW

KW - FOS-IMMUNOREACTIVITY

KW - PSEUDORABIES VIRUS

KW - EXTENDED AMYGDALA

KW - TALAIRACH ATLAS

KW - FILM EXCERPTS

U2 - 10.1002/hbm.20733

DO - 10.1002/hbm.20733

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 3089

EP - 3101

JO - Human brain mapping

JF - Human brain mapping

SN - 1065-9471

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 4970665