Publication

Liver Transplantation in Groningen, The Netherlands: A Single Center Status Report

de Vries, Y., de Jong, I. E. M., Berendsen, T. A., Lisman, T., Verkade, H. J., Scheenstra, R., Reyntjens, K. M. E. M., de Boer, M. T., Blokzijl, J., Peeters, P. M. G., van den Berg, A. P. & Porte, R. J., 2015, Clinical Transplants 2015. Vol. 31. p. 101-111 11 p. Chapter 10

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

The liver transplantation program of the University Medical Center Groningen in the Netherlands was started in 1979, making it one of the first programs worldwide. During the past 36 years, a total of 1478 liver transplantations have been performed, 459 of which were in children. One of the first patients transplanted in 1979 is still alive and is one of the longest surviving patients after liver transplantation worldwide. During the last decade, an increasing number of donation after circulatory death (DCD) donor livers have been accepted for transplantation. Over 30% of the livers transplanted in Groningen come from DCD donors. These livers have an increased risk of developing biliary complications, such as non-anastomotic biliary strictures (NAS). One of the main research topics in Groningen has been the pathogenesis and prevention of NAS. In an attempt to reduce the incidence of NAS after liver transplantation, machine perfusion technology has been developed as an alternative to the traditional method of static cold storage. Researchers of the Groningen liver transplant team were the first in the world to report a method of ex situ normothermic machine perfusion of human donor livers. The efficacy and safety of various types of machine perfusion are currently studied in both animal models and clinical trials. A second line of research in Groningen focuses on alterations in the blood coagulation system in patients with liver disease and undergoing liver transplantation. Groningen researchers were the first to describe a 'rebalanced state' of the coagulation system in patients with liver disease, making them prone to both bleeding and thrombo-embolic complications. Clinicians and researchers at the Groningen liver transplant program will continue to collaborate with a shared focus and the aim to provide innovation and the highest level of care to patients with endstage liver disease.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClinical Transplants 2015
Pages101-111
Number of pages11
Volume31
Publication statusPublished - 2015

ID: 42267581