Publication

Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors

Gerpott, F. H., Lehmann-Willenbrock, N. & Scheibe, S., Apr-2020, In : Work, Aging and Retirement. 6, 2, p. 65-70 6 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Gerpott, F. H., Lehmann-Willenbrock, N., & Scheibe, S. (2020). Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors. Work, Aging and Retirement, 6(2), 65-70. https://doi.org/10.1093/workar/waaa002

Author

Gerpott, Fabiola H. ; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale ; Scheibe, Susanne. / Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors. In: Work, Aging and Retirement. 2020 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 65-70.

Harvard

Gerpott, FH, Lehmann-Willenbrock, N & Scheibe, S 2020, 'Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors', Work, Aging and Retirement, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 65-70. https://doi.org/10.1093/workar/waaa002

Standard

Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors. / Gerpott, Fabiola H.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Scheibe, Susanne.

In: Work, Aging and Retirement, Vol. 6, No. 2, 04.2020, p. 65-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Gerpott FH, Lehmann-Willenbrock N, Scheibe S. Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors. Work, Aging and Retirement. 2020 Apr;6(2):65-70. https://doi.org/10.1093/workar/waaa002


BibTeX

@article{54c0f46f18b44664a6878b2bab5ad48a,
title = "Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors",
abstract = "Research on work and aging predominantly relies on self-report data to create new insights relevant to individuals, organizations, and society. Whereas surveys and interviews based on self-reports offer a valuable inward-directed perspective on individuals and their understanding of others, they can only provide limited knowledge on the behaviors of employees at different ages and in age-diverse settings. This is because what employees actually do is often considerably different from their survey-based reports of what they or others do. In this commentary, we challenge the field to move beyond a science of questionnaires by complementing survey research with behavioral data. First, this would allow scholars to identify when and how behaviors accurately translate into surveyed perceptions of behaviors. Second, such an approach can advance our understanding of the micro-dynamics occurring in age-diverse workforces that ultimately manifest in emerging phenomena (e.g., age-inclusive climate, psychological safety perceptions, or group affective tone). Lastly, studying concrete and specific behaviors also allows scholars to develop better interventions and provide meaningful recommendations for practice that differentiate actual from perceived behaviors.",
keywords = "AGE-DIFFERENCES, EMOTION, OLDER, PERCEPTION, RESPONSES, GOALS",
author = "Gerpott, {Fabiola H.} and Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock and Susanne Scheibe",
year = "2020",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1093/workar/waaa002",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "65--70",
journal = "Work, Aging and Retirement",
issn = "2054-4642",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is Work and Aging Research a Science of Questionnaires? Moving the Field Forward by Considering Perceived Versus Actual Behaviors

AU - Gerpott, Fabiola H.

AU - Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale

AU - Scheibe, Susanne

PY - 2020/4

Y1 - 2020/4

N2 - Research on work and aging predominantly relies on self-report data to create new insights relevant to individuals, organizations, and society. Whereas surveys and interviews based on self-reports offer a valuable inward-directed perspective on individuals and their understanding of others, they can only provide limited knowledge on the behaviors of employees at different ages and in age-diverse settings. This is because what employees actually do is often considerably different from their survey-based reports of what they or others do. In this commentary, we challenge the field to move beyond a science of questionnaires by complementing survey research with behavioral data. First, this would allow scholars to identify when and how behaviors accurately translate into surveyed perceptions of behaviors. Second, such an approach can advance our understanding of the micro-dynamics occurring in age-diverse workforces that ultimately manifest in emerging phenomena (e.g., age-inclusive climate, psychological safety perceptions, or group affective tone). Lastly, studying concrete and specific behaviors also allows scholars to develop better interventions and provide meaningful recommendations for practice that differentiate actual from perceived behaviors.

AB - Research on work and aging predominantly relies on self-report data to create new insights relevant to individuals, organizations, and society. Whereas surveys and interviews based on self-reports offer a valuable inward-directed perspective on individuals and their understanding of others, they can only provide limited knowledge on the behaviors of employees at different ages and in age-diverse settings. This is because what employees actually do is often considerably different from their survey-based reports of what they or others do. In this commentary, we challenge the field to move beyond a science of questionnaires by complementing survey research with behavioral data. First, this would allow scholars to identify when and how behaviors accurately translate into surveyed perceptions of behaviors. Second, such an approach can advance our understanding of the micro-dynamics occurring in age-diverse workforces that ultimately manifest in emerging phenomena (e.g., age-inclusive climate, psychological safety perceptions, or group affective tone). Lastly, studying concrete and specific behaviors also allows scholars to develop better interventions and provide meaningful recommendations for practice that differentiate actual from perceived behaviors.

KW - AGE-DIFFERENCES

KW - EMOTION

KW - OLDER

KW - PERCEPTION

KW - RESPONSES

KW - GOALS

U2 - 10.1093/workar/waaa002

DO - 10.1093/workar/waaa002

M3 - Review article

VL - 6

SP - 65

EP - 70

JO - Work, Aging and Retirement

JF - Work, Aging and Retirement

SN - 2054-4642

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 133149962