Publication

Is there a relationship between serum S-100 beta protein and neuropsychologic dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass?

Westaby, S., Saatvedt, K., White, S., Katsumata, T., van Oeveren, W., Bhatnagar, NK., Brown, S. & Halligan, PW., Jan-2000, In : JOURNAL OF THORACIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY. 119, 1, p. 132-137 6 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

  • S Westaby
  • K Saatvedt
  • S White
  • T Katsumata
  • W van Oeveren
  • NK Bhatnagar
  • S Brown
  • PW Halligan

Objectives: Over the past decade, the glial protein S-100 beta has been used to detect cerebral injury in a number of clinical settings including cardiac surgery. Previous investigations suggest that S-100 beta is capable of identifying patients with cerebral dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass. Whether detection of elevated levels S-100 beta reflects long-term cognitive impairment remains to be shown. The present study evaluated whether perioperative release of S-100 beta after coronary artery operations with cardiopulmonary bypass could predict early or late neuropsychologic impairment. Methods: A total of 100 patients undergoing elective coronary bypass without a previous history of neurologic events were prospectively studied. To exclude noncerebral sources of S-100 beta, we did not use cardiotomy suction or retransfusion of shed mediastinal blood. Serial perioperative measurements of S-100 beta were performed with the use of a new sensitive immunoluminometric assay up to 8 hours after the operation. Patients underwent cognitive testing on a battery of 11 tests before the operation, before discharge from the hospital, and 3 months later. Results: No significant correlation was found between S-100 beta release and neuropsychologic measures either 5 days or 3 months after the operation, Conclusion: Despite using a sensitive immunoluminometric assay of S-100 beta, we found no evidence to support the suggestion that early release of S-100 beta may reflect long-term neurologic injury capable of producing cognitive impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)132-137
Number of pages6
JournalJOURNAL OF THORACIC AND CARDIOVASCULAR SURGERY
Volume119
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan-2000

    Keywords

  • CORONARY-ARTERY BYPASS, CARDIAC-SURGERY, BRAIN MICROEMBOLI, CEREBRAL INJURY, MARKER, OPERATIONS, INFARCTION, EMBOLI, STROKE, BLOOD

ID: 3841562