Publication

Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology?

Vaessen, T., van Nierop, M., Decoster, J., Delespaul, P., Derom, C., de Hert, M., Jacobs, N., Menne-Lothmann, C., Rutten, B., Thiery, E., van Os, J., van Winkel, R., Wichers, M. & Myin-Germeys, I., Sep-2017, In : European Psychiatry. 45, p. 167-173 7 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Vaessen, T., van Nierop, M., Decoster, J., Delespaul, P., Derom, C., de Hert, M., ... Myin-Germeys, I. (2017). Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology? European Psychiatry, 45, 167-173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.07.002

Author

Vaessen, T. ; van Nierop, M. ; Decoster, J. ; Delespaul, P. ; Derom, C. ; de Hert, M. ; Jacobs, N. ; Menne-Lothmann, C. ; Rutten, B. ; Thiery, E. ; van Os, J. ; van Winkel, R. ; Wichers, M. ; Myin-Germeys, I. / Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology?. In: European Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 45. pp. 167-173.

Harvard

Vaessen, T, van Nierop, M, Decoster, J, Delespaul, P, Derom, C, de Hert, M, Jacobs, N, Menne-Lothmann, C, Rutten, B, Thiery, E, van Os, J, van Winkel, R, Wichers, M & Myin-Germeys, I 2017, 'Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology?', European Psychiatry, vol. 45, pp. 167-173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.07.002

Standard

Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology? / Vaessen, T.; van Nierop, M.; Decoster, J.; Delespaul, P.; Derom, C.; de Hert, M.; Jacobs, N.; Menne-Lothmann, C.; Rutten, B.; Thiery, E.; van Os, J.; van Winkel, R.; Wichers, M.; Myin-Germeys, I.

In: European Psychiatry, Vol. 45, 09.2017, p. 167-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Vaessen T, van Nierop M, Decoster J, Delespaul P, Derom C, de Hert M et al. Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology? European Psychiatry. 2017 Sep;45:167-173. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.07.002


BibTeX

@article{3282098e63d9454a9febb889ba674599,
title = "Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology?",
abstract = "Purpose: The aim of the current study was to replicate findings in adults indicating that higher sensitivity to stressful events is predictive of both onset and persistence of psychopathological symptoms in a sample of adolescents and young adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that sensitivity to mild stressors in particular is predictive of the developmental course of psychopathology.Methods: We analyzed experience sampling and questionnaire data collected at baseline and one-year follow-up of 445 adolescent and young adult twins and non-twin siblings (age range: 15-34). Linear multilevel regression was used for the replication analyses. To test if affective sensitivity to mild stressors in particular was associated with follow-up symptoms, we used a categorical approach adding variables on affective sensitivity to mild, moderate and severe daily stressors to the model.Results: Linear analyses showed that emotional stress reactivity was not associated with onset (β = .02; P = .56) or persistence (β = −.01; P = .78) of symptoms. There was a significant effect of baseline symptom score (β = .53; P < .001) and average negative affect (NA: β = .19; P < .001) on follow-up symptoms. Using the categorical approach, we found that affective sensitivity to mild (β = .25; P < .001), but not moderate (β = −.03; P = .65) or severe (β = −.06; P = .42), stressors was associated with symptom persistence one year later.Discussion: We were unable to replicate previous findings relating stress sensitivity linearly to symptom onset or persistence in a younger sample. Whereas sensitivity to more severe stressors may reflect adaptive coping, high sensitivity to the mildest of daily stressors may indicate an increased risk for psychopathology.",
keywords = "Experience sampling method, Stress reactivity, Epidemiology, Prospective, Longitudinal, DAILY-LIFE STRESS, EXPERIENCE SAMPLING RESEARCH, EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY, PSYCHOTIC EXPERIENCES, PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS, AFFECTIVE-DISORDER, SALIVARY CORTISOL, NEGATIVE AFFECT, GENETIC RISK, INDIVIDUALS",
author = "T. Vaessen and {van Nierop}, M. and J. Decoster and P. Delespaul and C. Derom and {de Hert}, M. and N. Jacobs and C. Menne-Lothmann and B. Rutten and E. Thiery and {van Os}, J. and {van Winkel}, R. and M. Wichers and I. Myin-Germeys",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.07.002",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "167--173",
journal = "European Psychiatry",
issn = "0924-9338",
publisher = "ELSEVIER FRANCE-EDITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES MEDICALES ELSEVIER",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is sensitivity to daily stress predictive of onset or persistence of psychopathology?

AU - Vaessen, T.

AU - van Nierop, M.

AU - Decoster, J.

AU - Delespaul, P.

AU - Derom, C.

AU - de Hert, M.

AU - Jacobs, N.

AU - Menne-Lothmann, C.

AU - Rutten, B.

AU - Thiery, E.

AU - van Os, J.

AU - van Winkel, R.

AU - Wichers, M.

AU - Myin-Germeys, I.

PY - 2017/9

Y1 - 2017/9

N2 - Purpose: The aim of the current study was to replicate findings in adults indicating that higher sensitivity to stressful events is predictive of both onset and persistence of psychopathological symptoms in a sample of adolescents and young adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that sensitivity to mild stressors in particular is predictive of the developmental course of psychopathology.Methods: We analyzed experience sampling and questionnaire data collected at baseline and one-year follow-up of 445 adolescent and young adult twins and non-twin siblings (age range: 15-34). Linear multilevel regression was used for the replication analyses. To test if affective sensitivity to mild stressors in particular was associated with follow-up symptoms, we used a categorical approach adding variables on affective sensitivity to mild, moderate and severe daily stressors to the model.Results: Linear analyses showed that emotional stress reactivity was not associated with onset (β = .02; P = .56) or persistence (β = −.01; P = .78) of symptoms. There was a significant effect of baseline symptom score (β = .53; P < .001) and average negative affect (NA: β = .19; P < .001) on follow-up symptoms. Using the categorical approach, we found that affective sensitivity to mild (β = .25; P < .001), but not moderate (β = −.03; P = .65) or severe (β = −.06; P = .42), stressors was associated with symptom persistence one year later.Discussion: We were unable to replicate previous findings relating stress sensitivity linearly to symptom onset or persistence in a younger sample. Whereas sensitivity to more severe stressors may reflect adaptive coping, high sensitivity to the mildest of daily stressors may indicate an increased risk for psychopathology.

AB - Purpose: The aim of the current study was to replicate findings in adults indicating that higher sensitivity to stressful events is predictive of both onset and persistence of psychopathological symptoms in a sample of adolescents and young adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that sensitivity to mild stressors in particular is predictive of the developmental course of psychopathology.Methods: We analyzed experience sampling and questionnaire data collected at baseline and one-year follow-up of 445 adolescent and young adult twins and non-twin siblings (age range: 15-34). Linear multilevel regression was used for the replication analyses. To test if affective sensitivity to mild stressors in particular was associated with follow-up symptoms, we used a categorical approach adding variables on affective sensitivity to mild, moderate and severe daily stressors to the model.Results: Linear analyses showed that emotional stress reactivity was not associated with onset (β = .02; P = .56) or persistence (β = −.01; P = .78) of symptoms. There was a significant effect of baseline symptom score (β = .53; P < .001) and average negative affect (NA: β = .19; P < .001) on follow-up symptoms. Using the categorical approach, we found that affective sensitivity to mild (β = .25; P < .001), but not moderate (β = −.03; P = .65) or severe (β = −.06; P = .42), stressors was associated with symptom persistence one year later.Discussion: We were unable to replicate previous findings relating stress sensitivity linearly to symptom onset or persistence in a younger sample. Whereas sensitivity to more severe stressors may reflect adaptive coping, high sensitivity to the mildest of daily stressors may indicate an increased risk for psychopathology.

KW - Experience sampling method

KW - Stress reactivity

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Prospective

KW - Longitudinal

KW - DAILY-LIFE STRESS

KW - EXPERIENCE SAMPLING RESEARCH

KW - EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY

KW - PSYCHOTIC EXPERIENCES

KW - PSYCHOSOCIAL STRESS

KW - AFFECTIVE-DISORDER

KW - SALIVARY CORTISOL

KW - NEGATIVE AFFECT

KW - GENETIC RISK

KW - INDIVIDUALS

U2 - 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.07.002

DO - 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2017.07.002

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 167

EP - 173

JO - European Psychiatry

JF - European Psychiatry

SN - 0924-9338

ER -

ID: 50397337