Publication

Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses: a pilot study

van Praagh, J. B., de Goffau, M. C., Bakker, I. S., Harmsen, H. J. M., Olinga, P. & Havenga, K., Jun-2016, In : Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques. 30, 6, p. 2259-2265 7 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

van Praagh, J. B., de Goffau, M. C., Bakker, I. S., Harmsen, H. J. M., Olinga, P., & Havenga, K. (2016). Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses: a pilot study. Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques, 30(6), 2259-2265. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-015-4508-z

Author

van Praagh, Jasper B. ; de Goffau, Marcus C. ; Bakker, Ilsalien S. ; Harmsen, Hermie J. M. ; Olinga, Peter ; Havenga, Klaas. / Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses : a pilot study. In: Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 2259-2265.

Harvard

van Praagh, JB, de Goffau, MC, Bakker, IS, Harmsen, HJM, Olinga, P & Havenga, K 2016, 'Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses: a pilot study', Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 2259-2265. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-015-4508-z

Standard

Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses : a pilot study. / van Praagh, Jasper B.; de Goffau, Marcus C.; Bakker, Ilsalien S.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; Olinga, Peter; Havenga, Klaas.

In: Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques, Vol. 30, No. 6, 06.2016, p. 2259-2265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

van Praagh JB, de Goffau MC, Bakker IS, Harmsen HJM, Olinga P, Havenga K. Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses: a pilot study. Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques. 2016 Jun;30(6):2259-2265. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00464-015-4508-z


BibTeX

@article{0897f8613f9e4bbc8794245410741511,
title = "Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses: a pilot study",
abstract = "Background Anastomotic leakage (AL) after colorectal surgery is a severe complication, resulting in morbidity, reinterventions, prolonged hospital stay and, in some cases, death. Some technical and patient-related aetiological factors of AL are well established. In many cases, however, none of these factors seem to explain the occurrence of AL. Recent studies suggest that the intestinal microbiome plays a role in wound healing, diabetes and Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to compare the intestinal microbiota of patients who developed AL with matched patients with healed colorectal anastomoses.Methods We investigated the microbiome in the doughnuts collected from 16 patients participating in the C-seal trial. We selected eight patients who developed AL requiring reintervention and eight matched controls without AL. We analysed the bacterial 16S rDNA of both groups with MiSeq sequencing.Results The abundance of Lachnospiraceae is statistically higher (P = 0.001) in patient group who did develop AL, while microbial diversity levels were higher in the group who did not develop AL (P = 0.037). Body mass index (BMI) was also positively associated with the abundance of the Lachnospiraceae family (P = 0.022).Conclusion A correlation between the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae, low microbial diversity and anastomotic leakage, possibly in association with the BMI, was found. The relative abundance of the Lachnospiraceae family is possibly explained by the higher abundance of mucin-degrading Ruminococci within that family in AL cases (P = 0.011) as is similarly the case in IBD.",
keywords = "Anastomotic leakage, Intestinal microbiome, Colorectal surgery, Stapled anastomosis, DNA sequencing, Complications, GUT MICROBIOTA, BUTYRATE, SURGERY, BACTERIA, OBESITY, INFLAMMATION, ENVIRONMENT, DEHISCENCE, RESECTION, CHILDREN",
author = "{van Praagh}, {Jasper B.} and {de Goffau}, {Marcus C.} and Bakker, {Ilsalien S.} and Harmsen, {Hermie J. M.} and Peter Olinga and Klaas Havenga",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s00464-015-4508-z",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "2259--2265",
journal = "Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques",
issn = "0930-2794",
publisher = "SPRINGER",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intestinal microbiota and anastomotic leakage of stapled colorectal anastomoses

T2 - a pilot study

AU - van Praagh, Jasper B.

AU - de Goffau, Marcus C.

AU - Bakker, Ilsalien S.

AU - Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

AU - Olinga, Peter

AU - Havenga, Klaas

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - Background Anastomotic leakage (AL) after colorectal surgery is a severe complication, resulting in morbidity, reinterventions, prolonged hospital stay and, in some cases, death. Some technical and patient-related aetiological factors of AL are well established. In many cases, however, none of these factors seem to explain the occurrence of AL. Recent studies suggest that the intestinal microbiome plays a role in wound healing, diabetes and Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to compare the intestinal microbiota of patients who developed AL with matched patients with healed colorectal anastomoses.Methods We investigated the microbiome in the doughnuts collected from 16 patients participating in the C-seal trial. We selected eight patients who developed AL requiring reintervention and eight matched controls without AL. We analysed the bacterial 16S rDNA of both groups with MiSeq sequencing.Results The abundance of Lachnospiraceae is statistically higher (P = 0.001) in patient group who did develop AL, while microbial diversity levels were higher in the group who did not develop AL (P = 0.037). Body mass index (BMI) was also positively associated with the abundance of the Lachnospiraceae family (P = 0.022).Conclusion A correlation between the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae, low microbial diversity and anastomotic leakage, possibly in association with the BMI, was found. The relative abundance of the Lachnospiraceae family is possibly explained by the higher abundance of mucin-degrading Ruminococci within that family in AL cases (P = 0.011) as is similarly the case in IBD.

AB - Background Anastomotic leakage (AL) after colorectal surgery is a severe complication, resulting in morbidity, reinterventions, prolonged hospital stay and, in some cases, death. Some technical and patient-related aetiological factors of AL are well established. In many cases, however, none of these factors seem to explain the occurrence of AL. Recent studies suggest that the intestinal microbiome plays a role in wound healing, diabetes and Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to compare the intestinal microbiota of patients who developed AL with matched patients with healed colorectal anastomoses.Methods We investigated the microbiome in the doughnuts collected from 16 patients participating in the C-seal trial. We selected eight patients who developed AL requiring reintervention and eight matched controls without AL. We analysed the bacterial 16S rDNA of both groups with MiSeq sequencing.Results The abundance of Lachnospiraceae is statistically higher (P = 0.001) in patient group who did develop AL, while microbial diversity levels were higher in the group who did not develop AL (P = 0.037). Body mass index (BMI) was also positively associated with the abundance of the Lachnospiraceae family (P = 0.022).Conclusion A correlation between the bacterial family Lachnospiraceae, low microbial diversity and anastomotic leakage, possibly in association with the BMI, was found. The relative abundance of the Lachnospiraceae family is possibly explained by the higher abundance of mucin-degrading Ruminococci within that family in AL cases (P = 0.011) as is similarly the case in IBD.

KW - Anastomotic leakage

KW - Intestinal microbiome

KW - Colorectal surgery

KW - Stapled anastomosis

KW - DNA sequencing

KW - Complications

KW - GUT MICROBIOTA

KW - BUTYRATE

KW - SURGERY

KW - BACTERIA

KW - OBESITY

KW - INFLAMMATION

KW - ENVIRONMENT

KW - DEHISCENCE

KW - RESECTION

KW - CHILDREN

U2 - 10.1007/s00464-015-4508-z

DO - 10.1007/s00464-015-4508-z

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 2259

EP - 2265

JO - Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques

JF - Surgical endoscopy and other interventional techniques

SN - 0930-2794

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 34676909