Publication

Improved usability of a multi-infusion setup using a central control display

Doesburg, F., Cnossen, F., Dieperink, W., Bult, W. & Nijsten, M. W., Oct-2016, p. 147-148. 203 p.

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  • Improved usability of a multi-infusion setup using a central control display

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DOI

Infusion pumps are often associated with poor usability and an increased likelihood of medication errors [1]. Critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) usually receive multiple infusions simultaneously, which increases the likelihood of pump-related errors. Furthermore, the ICU is frequently a hectic environment, compounding the likelihood of human error. Improving the usability of infusion pumps could help prevent injury or death in this vulnerable population. Where previous usability studies focused on individual pumps, this study focuses on the pump system as a whole, a situation more representative of the ICU.

Objectives

The aim of this study is to develop and test a pump display that facilitates centralized monitoring and control of multiple infusion pumps to improve the safety and efficiency in the interaction with infusion technology.

Method

A central pump display was developed according to the latest guidelines in user-centered design [2]. The usability of this display was compared to that of a conventional pump setup in a simulation study where 18 ICU nurses performed common pump-related tasks with either the central or conventional interface. Participants had a mean of 12 (±12) years of ICU work experience. Task execution times and key presses were recorded and logs were scanned for errors after the experiment. A usability questionnaire with a 5-point Likert scale was administered at the end of each experimental run to assess end-user satisfaction.

Results

Overall there was no difference in total task execution time between the central (M = 421 ± 107 seconds) and conventional system (M = 405 ± 119), p = 0.78. Fewer clicks were needed to execute the tasks with the centralized system compared to the conventional system (40 ± 3 and 73 ± 20 clicks respectively), p = 0.001. Fewer errors were made with the centralized system compared to the conventional system (0.9 ± 1 and 2.9 ± 2 errors respectively), p = 0.031. Questionnaire results indicated an overall preference towards the centralized system (4.6 ± 0.3 vs. 4.1 ± 0.5), p = 0.033.

Conclusions

Expert users with significant experience using the conventional pump interface demonstrated a more efficient and safer performance using the central control display. The central control display had a better overall usability than the conventional pump control interface, despite participants never having used it before. The results of this study underline the importance of usability testing in the improvement of high-risk medical systems.

References

1. Husch M, Sullivan C, Rooney D, et al (2005) Insights from the sharp end of intravenous medication errors: implications for infusion pump technology. Qual Saf Health Care 14:80-6.

2. Zhang J, Johnson TR, Patel VL, et al (2003) Using usability heuristics to evaluate patient safety of medical devices. J Biomed Inform 36:23-30.

Grant acknowledgment

This study was supported by a UMCG Healthy Ageing grant.
Original languageEnglish
Pages147-148
Number of pages203
Publication statusPublished - Oct-2016
Event29th Annual Congress European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Milan - Milan, Italy
Duration: 1-Oct-20165-Oct-2016
http://www.esicm.org/

Conference

Conference29th Annual Congress European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Milan
Abbreviated titleESICM lives 2016
CountryItaly
CityMilan
Period01/10/201605/10/2016
Internet address

Event

29th Annual Congress European Society of Intensive Care Medicine Milan

01/10/201605/10/2016

Milan, Italy

Event: Conference

ID: 36699763