Publication

Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS: Learning From the Zebrafish

Oosterhof, N., Boddeke, E. & van Ham, T. J., May-2015, In : Glia. 63, 5, p. 719-735 17 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Oosterhof, N., Boddeke, E., & van Ham, T. J. (2015). Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS: Learning From the Zebrafish. Glia, 63(5), 719-735. https://doi.org/10.1002/glia.22780

Author

Oosterhof, Nynke ; Boddeke, Erik ; van Ham, Tjakko J. / Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS : Learning From the Zebrafish. In: Glia. 2015 ; Vol. 63, No. 5. pp. 719-735.

Harvard

Oosterhof, N, Boddeke, E & van Ham, TJ 2015, 'Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS: Learning From the Zebrafish', Glia, vol. 63, no. 5, pp. 719-735. https://doi.org/10.1002/glia.22780

Standard

Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS : Learning From the Zebrafish. / Oosterhof, Nynke; Boddeke, Erik; van Ham, Tjakko J.

In: Glia, Vol. 63, No. 5, 05.2015, p. 719-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Oosterhof N, Boddeke E, van Ham TJ. Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS: Learning From the Zebrafish. Glia. 2015 May;63(5):719-735. https://doi.org/10.1002/glia.22780


BibTeX

@article{0a4225181ff84179a82257212f149705,
title = "Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS: Learning From the Zebrafish",
abstract = "A major question in research on immune responses in the brain is how the timing and nature of these responses influence physiology, pathogenesis or recovery from pathogenic processes. Proper understanding of the immune regulation of the human brain requires a detailed description of the function and activities of the immune cells in the brain. Zebrafish larvae allow long-term, noninvasive imaging inside the brain at high-spatiotemporal resolution using fluorescent transgenic reporters labeling specific cell populations. Together with recent additional technical advances this allows an unprecedented versatility and scope of future studies. Modeling of human physiology and pathology in zebrafish has already yielded relevant insights into cellular dynamics and function that can be translated to the human clinical situation. For instance, in vivo studies in the zebrafish have provided new insight into immune cell dynamics in granuloma formation in tuberculosis and the mechanisms involving treatment resistance. In this review, we highlight recent findings and novel tools paving the way for basic neuroimmunology research in the zebrafish. GLIA 2015;63:719-735",
keywords = "microglia, brain disease, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, live imaging, immune cell behavior, CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM, TARGETED GENE DISRUPTION, NEURONAL NMDA RECEPTORS, IN-VIVO, FLUORESCENT PROTEINS, TRANSGENIC ZEBRAFISH, APOPTOTIC CELLS, T-CELL, PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS, NEUTROPHIL MOTILITY",
author = "Nynke Oosterhof and Erik Boddeke and {van Ham}, {Tjakko J.}",
year = "2015",
month = may,
doi = "10.1002/glia.22780",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "719--735",
journal = "Glia",
issn = "0894-1491",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Immune Cell Dynamics in the CNS

T2 - Learning From the Zebrafish

AU - Oosterhof, Nynke

AU - Boddeke, Erik

AU - van Ham, Tjakko J.

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - A major question in research on immune responses in the brain is how the timing and nature of these responses influence physiology, pathogenesis or recovery from pathogenic processes. Proper understanding of the immune regulation of the human brain requires a detailed description of the function and activities of the immune cells in the brain. Zebrafish larvae allow long-term, noninvasive imaging inside the brain at high-spatiotemporal resolution using fluorescent transgenic reporters labeling specific cell populations. Together with recent additional technical advances this allows an unprecedented versatility and scope of future studies. Modeling of human physiology and pathology in zebrafish has already yielded relevant insights into cellular dynamics and function that can be translated to the human clinical situation. For instance, in vivo studies in the zebrafish have provided new insight into immune cell dynamics in granuloma formation in tuberculosis and the mechanisms involving treatment resistance. In this review, we highlight recent findings and novel tools paving the way for basic neuroimmunology research in the zebrafish. GLIA 2015;63:719-735

AB - A major question in research on immune responses in the brain is how the timing and nature of these responses influence physiology, pathogenesis or recovery from pathogenic processes. Proper understanding of the immune regulation of the human brain requires a detailed description of the function and activities of the immune cells in the brain. Zebrafish larvae allow long-term, noninvasive imaging inside the brain at high-spatiotemporal resolution using fluorescent transgenic reporters labeling specific cell populations. Together with recent additional technical advances this allows an unprecedented versatility and scope of future studies. Modeling of human physiology and pathology in zebrafish has already yielded relevant insights into cellular dynamics and function that can be translated to the human clinical situation. For instance, in vivo studies in the zebrafish have provided new insight into immune cell dynamics in granuloma formation in tuberculosis and the mechanisms involving treatment resistance. In this review, we highlight recent findings and novel tools paving the way for basic neuroimmunology research in the zebrafish. GLIA 2015;63:719-735

KW - microglia

KW - brain disease

KW - neurodegeneration

KW - neuroinflammation

KW - live imaging

KW - immune cell behavior

KW - CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM

KW - TARGETED GENE DISRUPTION

KW - NEURONAL NMDA RECEPTORS

KW - IN-VIVO

KW - FLUORESCENT PROTEINS

KW - TRANSGENIC ZEBRAFISH

KW - APOPTOTIC CELLS

KW - T-CELL

KW - PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS

KW - NEUTROPHIL MOTILITY

U2 - 10.1002/glia.22780

DO - 10.1002/glia.22780

M3 - Review article

VL - 63

SP - 719

EP - 735

JO - Glia

JF - Glia

SN - 0894-1491

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 19507299