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Higher filtration fraction in formerly early-onset preeclamptic women without comorbidity

Toering, T. J., van der Graaf, A. M., Visser, F. W., Groen, H., Faas, M. M., Navis, G. & Lely, A. T., 15-Apr-2015, In : American journal of physiology-Renal physiology. 308, 8, p. F824-F831 8 p.

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  • Higher filtration fraction in formerly early-onset preeclamptic women without comorbidity

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DOI

Formerly preeclamptic women have an increased risk for developing end-stage renal disease, which has been attributed to altered renal hemodynamics and abnormalities in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Whether this is due to preeclampsia itself or to comorbid conditions is unknown. Renal hemodynamics and responsiveness to ANG II during low Na+ intake (7 days, 50 mmol Na (+)/24 h) and high Na+ (HS) intake (7 days, 200 mmol Na (+)/24 h) were studied in 18 healthy normotensive formerly early-onset preeclamptic women (fPE women) and 18 healthy control subjects (fHP women), all selected for absence of comorbidity. At the end of each diet, renal hemodynamics and blood pressure were measured before and during graded ANG II infusion. Both HS intake and former preeclampsia increased filtration fraction (FF) without an interaction between the two. FF was highest during HS intake in fPE women [0.31 +/- 0.12 vs. 0.29 +/- 0.11 in fHP women, generalized estimating equation analysis (body mass index corrected), P = 0.03]. The renal response to ANG II infusion was not different between groups. In conclusion, fPE women have a higher FF compared with fHP women. As this was observed in the absence of comorbidity, preeclampsia itself might exert long-term effects on renal hemodynamics. However, we cannot exclude the presence of prepregnancy alterations in renal function, which, in itself, lead to an increased risk for preeclampsia. In experimental studies, an elevated FF has been shown to play a pathogenic role in the development of hypertension and renal damage. Future studies, however, should evaluate whether the subtle differences in renal hemodynamics after preeclampsia contribute to the increased long-term renal risk after preeclampsia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)F824-F831
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of physiology-Renal physiology
Volume308
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 15-Apr-2015

    Keywords

  • preeclampsia, postpartum, renal hemodynamics, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, Na+ intake, BODY-MASS INDEX, ANGIOTENSIN-II SENSITIVITY, STAGE RENAL-DISEASE, GLOMERULAR HYPERFILTRATION, HYPERTENSIVE DISORDERS, BLOOD-PRESSURE, HEMODYNAMICS, PREGNANCY, SODIUM, ASSOCIATION

ID: 16376170