Publication

Gateway groups: The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations

Levy, A. D. M., 2019, [Groningen]: University of Groningen. 149 p.

Research output: ThesisThesis fully internal (DIV)Academic

APA

Levy, A. D. M. (2019). Gateway groups: The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations. [Groningen]: University of Groningen.

Author

Levy, Aharon Dov Mordechai. / Gateway groups : The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations. [Groningen] : University of Groningen, 2019. 149 p.

Harvard

Levy, ADM 2019, 'Gateway groups: The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations', Doctor of Philosophy, University of Groningen, [Groningen].

Standard

Gateway groups : The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations. / Levy, Aharon Dov Mordechai.

[Groningen] : University of Groningen, 2019. 149 p.

Research output: ThesisThesis fully internal (DIV)Academic

Vancouver

Levy ADM. Gateway groups: The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations. [Groningen]: University of Groningen, 2019. 149 p.


BibTeX

@phdthesis{15d2bf85be7745f7868f7373e85af983,
title = "Gateway groups: The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations",
abstract = "This thesis addresses the potential role groups with multiple social identities (e.g., biracials) may play in positively transforming intergroup relations among their respective social counterparts (e.g., changing perceptions or behavioral intentions between Blacks and Whites). The aim of the thesis is to provide a conceptual framework that can capture a meaningful aspect of the modern complexity of social boundaries and identity, and then test this framework across different real-life intergroup contexts. The main questions we seek to answer are whether (1) groups with multiple social identities are indeed able to improve intergroup relations, and (2) if so, under what conditions. Specifically, we introduce the notion of Gateway Groups, defined as groups characterized by unique social categorizations that enable them to be categorized as, and identified with, more than one group within the context of intergroup relations. Throughout the thesis we examined this notion in three different social contexts: (1) The Israeli Palestinian context with Israeli Arabs as a potential Gateway Group. (2) The Western Balkans with Serbian Bosniaks as a Gateway Group. (3) The inter-racial relations in the U.S. with biracials as a Gateway Group. This research has both scientific and social relevance and value because the studies in this thesis are the first to focus on these intricate intergroup gateways and their potential social impact; furthermore, this approach can broaden existing conceptualization of multiple identities for a more comprehensive and complex understanding of intergroup dynamics.",
author = "Levy, {Aharon Dov Mordechai}",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
publisher = "University of Groningen",
school = "University of Groningen",

}

RIS

TY - THES

T1 - Gateway groups

T2 - The potential of multiple identities to improve intergroup relations

AU - Levy, Aharon Dov Mordechai

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - This thesis addresses the potential role groups with multiple social identities (e.g., biracials) may play in positively transforming intergroup relations among their respective social counterparts (e.g., changing perceptions or behavioral intentions between Blacks and Whites). The aim of the thesis is to provide a conceptual framework that can capture a meaningful aspect of the modern complexity of social boundaries and identity, and then test this framework across different real-life intergroup contexts. The main questions we seek to answer are whether (1) groups with multiple social identities are indeed able to improve intergroup relations, and (2) if so, under what conditions. Specifically, we introduce the notion of Gateway Groups, defined as groups characterized by unique social categorizations that enable them to be categorized as, and identified with, more than one group within the context of intergroup relations. Throughout the thesis we examined this notion in three different social contexts: (1) The Israeli Palestinian context with Israeli Arabs as a potential Gateway Group. (2) The Western Balkans with Serbian Bosniaks as a Gateway Group. (3) The inter-racial relations in the U.S. with biracials as a Gateway Group. This research has both scientific and social relevance and value because the studies in this thesis are the first to focus on these intricate intergroup gateways and their potential social impact; furthermore, this approach can broaden existing conceptualization of multiple identities for a more comprehensive and complex understanding of intergroup dynamics.

AB - This thesis addresses the potential role groups with multiple social identities (e.g., biracials) may play in positively transforming intergroup relations among their respective social counterparts (e.g., changing perceptions or behavioral intentions between Blacks and Whites). The aim of the thesis is to provide a conceptual framework that can capture a meaningful aspect of the modern complexity of social boundaries and identity, and then test this framework across different real-life intergroup contexts. The main questions we seek to answer are whether (1) groups with multiple social identities are indeed able to improve intergroup relations, and (2) if so, under what conditions. Specifically, we introduce the notion of Gateway Groups, defined as groups characterized by unique social categorizations that enable them to be categorized as, and identified with, more than one group within the context of intergroup relations. Throughout the thesis we examined this notion in three different social contexts: (1) The Israeli Palestinian context with Israeli Arabs as a potential Gateway Group. (2) The Western Balkans with Serbian Bosniaks as a Gateway Group. (3) The inter-racial relations in the U.S. with biracials as a Gateway Group. This research has both scientific and social relevance and value because the studies in this thesis are the first to focus on these intricate intergroup gateways and their potential social impact; furthermore, this approach can broaden existing conceptualization of multiple identities for a more comprehensive and complex understanding of intergroup dynamics.

M3 - Thesis fully internal (DIV)

PB - University of Groningen

CY - [Groningen]

ER -

ID: 73865546