Publication

Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction

Richter, A. E., Salavati, S., Kooi, E. M. W., den Heijer, A. E., Foreman, A. B., Schoots, M. H., Bilardo, C. M., Scherjon, S. A., Tanis, J. C. & Bos, A. F., 6-May-2020, In : Frontiers in Pediatrics. 8, 11 p., 225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Richter, A. E., Salavati, S., Kooi, E. M. W., den Heijer, A. E., Foreman, A. B., Schoots, M. H., Bilardo, C. M., Scherjon, S. A., Tanis, J. C., & Bos, A. F. (2020). Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction. Frontiers in Pediatrics, 8, [225]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.00225

Author

Richter, Anne E ; Salavati, Sahar ; Kooi, Elisabeth M W ; den Heijer, Anne E ; Foreman, Anne B ; Schoots, Mirthe H ; Bilardo, Caterina M ; Scherjon, Sicco A ; Tanis, Jozien C ; Bos, Arend F. / Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction. In: Frontiers in Pediatrics. 2020 ; Vol. 8.

Harvard

Richter, AE, Salavati, S, Kooi, EMW, den Heijer, AE, Foreman, AB, Schoots, MH, Bilardo, CM, Scherjon, SA, Tanis, JC & Bos, AF 2020, 'Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction', Frontiers in Pediatrics, vol. 8, 225. https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.00225

Standard

Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction. / Richter, Anne E; Salavati, Sahar; Kooi, Elisabeth M W; den Heijer, Anne E; Foreman, Anne B; Schoots, Mirthe H; Bilardo, Caterina M; Scherjon, Sicco A; Tanis, Jozien C; Bos, Arend F.

In: Frontiers in Pediatrics, Vol. 8, 225, 06.05.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Richter AE, Salavati S, Kooi EMW, den Heijer AE, Foreman AB, Schoots MH et al. Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction. Frontiers in Pediatrics. 2020 May 6;8. 225. https://doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.00225


BibTeX

@article{fcb38b303a394585874c090251562503,
title = "Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction",
abstract = "Objectives: To assess the role of fetal brain-sparing and postnatal cerebral oxygen saturation (rcSO2) as determinants of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome following fetal growth restriction (FGR). Methods: This was a prospective follow-up study of an FGR cohort of 41 children. Prenatally, the presence of fetal brain-sparing (cerebroplacental ratio < 1) was assessed by Doppler ultrasound. During the first two days after birth, rcSO2 was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. At 4 years of age, intelligence (IQ points), behavior (T-scores), and executive function (T-scores) were assessed using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Child Behavior Checklist, and Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function—Preschool Version, respectively. Using linear regression analyses, we tested the association (p < 0.05) between brain-sparing/rcSO2 and normed neurodevelopmental scores. Results: Twenty-six children (gestational age ranging from 28.0 to 39.9 weeks) participated in the follow-up at a median age of 4.3 (range: 3.6 to 4.4) years. Autism spectrum disorder was reported in three children (11.5%). Fetal brain-sparing was associated with better total and externalizing behavior (betas: −0.519 and −0.494, respectively). RcSO2 levels above the lowest quartile, particularly on postnatal day 2 (≥ 77%), were associated with better total and internalizing behavior and executive functioning (betas: −0.582, −0.489, and −0.467, respectively), but also lower performance IQ (beta: −0.530). Brain-sparing mediated some but not all of these associations. Conclusions: In this FGR cohort, fetal brain-sparing and high postnatal rcSO2 were—independently, but also as a reflection of the same mechanism—associated with better behavior and executive function. Postnatal cerebral hyperoxia, however, was negatively associated with brain functions responsible for performance IQ.",
keywords = "fetal doppler, cerebroplacental ratio, fetal brain-sparing, near-infrared spectroscopy, regional cerebral oxygen saturation, intelligence, behavior, executive function, CEREBROPLACENTAL DOPPLER RATIO, PERINATAL OUTCOMES, OXIDATIVE STRESS, INFANTS, REPRODUCIBILITY, NOSOLOGY, PREECLAMPSIA, CHILDREN, PLACENTA, LESIONS",
author = "Richter, {Anne E} and Sahar Salavati and Kooi, {Elisabeth M W} and {den Heijer}, {Anne E} and Foreman, {Anne B} and Schoots, {Mirthe H} and Bilardo, {Caterina M} and Scherjon, {Sicco A} and Tanis, {Jozien C} and Bos, {Arend F}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2020 Richter, Salavati, Kooi, Heijer, Foreman, Schoots, Bilardo, Scherjon, Tanis and Bos.",
year = "2020",
month = may,
day = "6",
doi = "10.3389/fped.2020.00225",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Frontiers in Pediatrics",
issn = "2296-2360",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fetal Brain-Sparing, Postnatal Cerebral Oxygenation, and Neurodevelopment at 4 Years of Age Following Fetal Growth Restriction

AU - Richter, Anne E

AU - Salavati, Sahar

AU - Kooi, Elisabeth M W

AU - den Heijer, Anne E

AU - Foreman, Anne B

AU - Schoots, Mirthe H

AU - Bilardo, Caterina M

AU - Scherjon, Sicco A

AU - Tanis, Jozien C

AU - Bos, Arend F

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Richter, Salavati, Kooi, Heijer, Foreman, Schoots, Bilardo, Scherjon, Tanis and Bos.

PY - 2020/5/6

Y1 - 2020/5/6

N2 - Objectives: To assess the role of fetal brain-sparing and postnatal cerebral oxygen saturation (rcSO2) as determinants of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome following fetal growth restriction (FGR). Methods: This was a prospective follow-up study of an FGR cohort of 41 children. Prenatally, the presence of fetal brain-sparing (cerebroplacental ratio < 1) was assessed by Doppler ultrasound. During the first two days after birth, rcSO2 was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. At 4 years of age, intelligence (IQ points), behavior (T-scores), and executive function (T-scores) were assessed using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Child Behavior Checklist, and Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function—Preschool Version, respectively. Using linear regression analyses, we tested the association (p < 0.05) between brain-sparing/rcSO2 and normed neurodevelopmental scores. Results: Twenty-six children (gestational age ranging from 28.0 to 39.9 weeks) participated in the follow-up at a median age of 4.3 (range: 3.6 to 4.4) years. Autism spectrum disorder was reported in three children (11.5%). Fetal brain-sparing was associated with better total and externalizing behavior (betas: −0.519 and −0.494, respectively). RcSO2 levels above the lowest quartile, particularly on postnatal day 2 (≥ 77%), were associated with better total and internalizing behavior and executive functioning (betas: −0.582, −0.489, and −0.467, respectively), but also lower performance IQ (beta: −0.530). Brain-sparing mediated some but not all of these associations. Conclusions: In this FGR cohort, fetal brain-sparing and high postnatal rcSO2 were—independently, but also as a reflection of the same mechanism—associated with better behavior and executive function. Postnatal cerebral hyperoxia, however, was negatively associated with brain functions responsible for performance IQ.

AB - Objectives: To assess the role of fetal brain-sparing and postnatal cerebral oxygen saturation (rcSO2) as determinants of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome following fetal growth restriction (FGR). Methods: This was a prospective follow-up study of an FGR cohort of 41 children. Prenatally, the presence of fetal brain-sparing (cerebroplacental ratio < 1) was assessed by Doppler ultrasound. During the first two days after birth, rcSO2 was measured with near-infrared spectroscopy. At 4 years of age, intelligence (IQ points), behavior (T-scores), and executive function (T-scores) were assessed using the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence, Child Behavior Checklist, and Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function—Preschool Version, respectively. Using linear regression analyses, we tested the association (p < 0.05) between brain-sparing/rcSO2 and normed neurodevelopmental scores. Results: Twenty-six children (gestational age ranging from 28.0 to 39.9 weeks) participated in the follow-up at a median age of 4.3 (range: 3.6 to 4.4) years. Autism spectrum disorder was reported in three children (11.5%). Fetal brain-sparing was associated with better total and externalizing behavior (betas: −0.519 and −0.494, respectively). RcSO2 levels above the lowest quartile, particularly on postnatal day 2 (≥ 77%), were associated with better total and internalizing behavior and executive functioning (betas: −0.582, −0.489, and −0.467, respectively), but also lower performance IQ (beta: −0.530). Brain-sparing mediated some but not all of these associations. Conclusions: In this FGR cohort, fetal brain-sparing and high postnatal rcSO2 were—independently, but also as a reflection of the same mechanism—associated with better behavior and executive function. Postnatal cerebral hyperoxia, however, was negatively associated with brain functions responsible for performance IQ.

KW - fetal doppler

KW - cerebroplacental ratio

KW - fetal brain-sparing

KW - near-infrared spectroscopy

KW - regional cerebral oxygen saturation

KW - intelligence

KW - behavior

KW - executive function

KW - CEREBROPLACENTAL DOPPLER RATIO

KW - PERINATAL OUTCOMES

KW - OXIDATIVE STRESS

KW - INFANTS

KW - REPRODUCIBILITY

KW - NOSOLOGY

KW - PREECLAMPSIA

KW - CHILDREN

KW - PLACENTA

KW - LESIONS

U2 - 10.3389/fped.2020.00225

DO - 10.3389/fped.2020.00225

M3 - Article

C2 - 32435629

VL - 8

JO - Frontiers in Pediatrics

JF - Frontiers in Pediatrics

SN - 2296-2360

M1 - 225

ER -

ID: 126347352