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Executive and behavioral functioning in pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy

van den Berg, L., de Weerd, A., Reuvekamp, M., Hagebeuk, E. & van der Meere, J., Oct-2018, In : Epilepsy & Behavior. 87, p. 117-122 6 p.

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  • Executive and behavioral functioning in pediatric frontal lobe epilepsy

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DOI

Objective: Epilepsy, as a chronic and neurological disease. is generally associated with an increased risk for social and emotional behavior problems in children. These findings are mostly derived from studies on children with different epilepsy types. However, there is limited information about the associations between frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and cognitive and behavioral problems. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between FLE and executive and behavioral functioning reported by parents and teachers.

Material and methods: Teachers and parents of 32 children (18 boys, 14 girls, mean age 9; 2 years +/- 1;6) with a confirmed diagnosis of FLE completed the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), and Teacher Report Form (TRF).

Results: About 25 to 35% of the parents and teachers rated children in the abnormal range of the main scales of the BRIEF, CBCL, and TRF. Teachers tend to report more metacognition problems, whereas parents tend to report more behavior regulation problems. Children with left-sided FLE showed more problems than children with bilateral or right-sided FLE. The whole range of executive dysfunctioning is linked to behavioral dysfunctioning in RE, but ratings vary across settings and informants. The epilepsy variables age of onset, lateralization, drug load, and duration of epilepsy had only a small and scattered contribution.

Conclusion: Ratings on the BRIEF, CBCL, and TRF are moderately to highly correlated, suggesting a (strong) link between executive and behavioral functioning. Subtle differences between parents and teachers ratings suggest different executive function demands in various settings. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-122
Number of pages6
JournalEpilepsy & Behavior
Volume87
Publication statusPublished - Oct-2018

    Keywords

  • Executive functions, Frontal lobe epilepsy, Children, BRIEF, CBCL, Behavior problems, Attention problems, DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, PSYCHIATRIC COMORBIDITY, CHILDHOOD EPILEPSY, SOCIAL COMPETENCE, RATING INVENTORY, CHILDREN, ATTENTION, ADOLESCENTS, ONSET

ID: 77585246