Publication

Everyday geographies of belonging: Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands

Huizinga, R. P. & van Hoven, B., Nov-2018, In : Geoforum. 96, p. 309-317 9 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Huizinga, R. P., & van Hoven, B. (2018). Everyday geographies of belonging: Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands. Geoforum, 96, 309-317. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.002

Author

Huizinga, Rik P. ; van Hoven, Bettina. / Everyday geographies of belonging : Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands. In: Geoforum. 2018 ; Vol. 96. pp. 309-317.

Harvard

Huizinga, RP & van Hoven, B 2018, 'Everyday geographies of belonging: Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands', Geoforum, vol. 96, pp. 309-317. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.002

Standard

Everyday geographies of belonging : Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands. / Huizinga, Rik P.; van Hoven, Bettina.

In: Geoforum, Vol. 96, 11.2018, p. 309-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Huizinga RP, van Hoven B. Everyday geographies of belonging: Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands. Geoforum. 2018 Nov;96:309-317. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.002


BibTeX

@article{006c567b64b84524a782f0835a068e50,
title = "Everyday geographies of belonging: Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands",
abstract = "The Dutch government currently underemphasises the interaction between refugees and place in the context of refugee spatial dispersal policy. This paper seeks a more detailed understanding of refugee integration by looking at opportunities for, and obstacles to, belonging within the ethnically homogeneous context of the Northern Netherlands. We draw on in-depth and walking interviews to provide a rich illustration of the daily routines and activities of ten Syrian male refugees in and around their residential neighbourhoods. Our findings highlight that a sense of belonging is grounded and embodied in space and place, and emphasise the role of everyday neighbourhood places as sites where refugee (non-)belonging emerges through social (non-)encounters and (non-)interaction with others. Daily life in transitory neighbourhood spaces provides opportunities for refugees to develop and maintain social relationships, asserting their presence and belonging in neighbourhood life. However, at the same time, refugees are demarcated as others because the different time geographies of refugees and existing residents form barriers to establishing nodes of encounter. Their otherness is further accentuated as potential places of encounter are often legally or economically inaccessible. Due to these experiences, or at least in part, refugees develop 'new places' built around shared memories, stories and food practices from their home country. Consequently, we argue for a more constructive understanding of migrant communities and suggest allowing multiple spaces of refugee belonging. Our study shows that achieving belonging is a multifaceted, nuanced and relational process, and one that is undervalued in the context of refugee dispersal in the Netherlands.",
keywords = "Belonging, Geographies of encounter, Neighbourhood, Everyday places, Syrian refugees, Northern Netherlands",
author = "Huizinga, {Rik P.} and {van Hoven}, Bettina",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.002",
language = "English",
volume = "96",
pages = "309--317",
journal = "Geoforum",
issn = "0016-7185",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Everyday geographies of belonging

T2 - Syrian refugee experiences in the Northern Netherlands

AU - Huizinga, Rik P.

AU - van Hoven, Bettina

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - The Dutch government currently underemphasises the interaction between refugees and place in the context of refugee spatial dispersal policy. This paper seeks a more detailed understanding of refugee integration by looking at opportunities for, and obstacles to, belonging within the ethnically homogeneous context of the Northern Netherlands. We draw on in-depth and walking interviews to provide a rich illustration of the daily routines and activities of ten Syrian male refugees in and around their residential neighbourhoods. Our findings highlight that a sense of belonging is grounded and embodied in space and place, and emphasise the role of everyday neighbourhood places as sites where refugee (non-)belonging emerges through social (non-)encounters and (non-)interaction with others. Daily life in transitory neighbourhood spaces provides opportunities for refugees to develop and maintain social relationships, asserting their presence and belonging in neighbourhood life. However, at the same time, refugees are demarcated as others because the different time geographies of refugees and existing residents form barriers to establishing nodes of encounter. Their otherness is further accentuated as potential places of encounter are often legally or economically inaccessible. Due to these experiences, or at least in part, refugees develop 'new places' built around shared memories, stories and food practices from their home country. Consequently, we argue for a more constructive understanding of migrant communities and suggest allowing multiple spaces of refugee belonging. Our study shows that achieving belonging is a multifaceted, nuanced and relational process, and one that is undervalued in the context of refugee dispersal in the Netherlands.

AB - The Dutch government currently underemphasises the interaction between refugees and place in the context of refugee spatial dispersal policy. This paper seeks a more detailed understanding of refugee integration by looking at opportunities for, and obstacles to, belonging within the ethnically homogeneous context of the Northern Netherlands. We draw on in-depth and walking interviews to provide a rich illustration of the daily routines and activities of ten Syrian male refugees in and around their residential neighbourhoods. Our findings highlight that a sense of belonging is grounded and embodied in space and place, and emphasise the role of everyday neighbourhood places as sites where refugee (non-)belonging emerges through social (non-)encounters and (non-)interaction with others. Daily life in transitory neighbourhood spaces provides opportunities for refugees to develop and maintain social relationships, asserting their presence and belonging in neighbourhood life. However, at the same time, refugees are demarcated as others because the different time geographies of refugees and existing residents form barriers to establishing nodes of encounter. Their otherness is further accentuated as potential places of encounter are often legally or economically inaccessible. Due to these experiences, or at least in part, refugees develop 'new places' built around shared memories, stories and food practices from their home country. Consequently, we argue for a more constructive understanding of migrant communities and suggest allowing multiple spaces of refugee belonging. Our study shows that achieving belonging is a multifaceted, nuanced and relational process, and one that is undervalued in the context of refugee dispersal in the Netherlands.

KW - Belonging

KW - Geographies of encounter

KW - Neighbourhood

KW - Everyday places

KW - Syrian refugees

KW - Northern Netherlands

U2 - 10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.002

DO - 10.1016/j.geoforum.2018.09.002

M3 - Article

VL - 96

SP - 309

EP - 317

JO - Geoforum

JF - Geoforum

SN - 0016-7185

ER -

ID: 77074693