Publication

Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style

Ticini, L. F., Rachman, L., Pelletier, J. & Dubal, S., 3-Jun-2014, In : Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 8, 6 p., 391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Ticini, L. F., Rachman, L., Pelletier, J., & Dubal, S. (2014). Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8, [391]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00391

Author

Ticini, Luca F ; Rachman, Laura ; Pelletier, Jerome ; Dubal, Stephanie. / Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style. In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 8.

Harvard

Ticini, LF, Rachman, L, Pelletier, J & Dubal, S 2014, 'Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style', Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, vol. 8, 391. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00391

Standard

Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style. / Ticini, Luca F; Rachman, Laura; Pelletier, Jerome; Dubal, Stephanie.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 8, 391, 03.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Ticini LF, Rachman L, Pelletier J, Dubal S. Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2014 Jun 3;8. 391. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00391


BibTeX

@article{84c9283e2e79442eba946505a5179701,
title = "Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style",
abstract = "The creation of an artwork requires motor activity. To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it? That is the question which we set out to answer. We presented participants with pointillist-style paintings featuring discernible brushstrokes and asked them to rate their liking of each canvas when it was preceded by images priming a motor act either compatible or incompatible with the simulation of the artist{\textquoteright}s movements. We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist{\textquoteright}s painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference. These results support the hypothesis that involuntary covert painting simulation contributes to aesthetic appreciation during passive observation of artwork.",
author = "Ticini, {Luca F} and Laura Rachman and Jerome Pelletier and Stephanie Dubal",
year = "2014",
month = jun,
day = "3",
doi = "10.3389/fnhum.2014.00391",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Frontiers in Human Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-5161",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enhancing aesthetic appreciation by priming canvases with actions that match the artist's painting style

AU - Ticini, Luca F

AU - Rachman, Laura

AU - Pelletier, Jerome

AU - Dubal, Stephanie

PY - 2014/6/3

Y1 - 2014/6/3

N2 - The creation of an artwork requires motor activity. To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it? That is the question which we set out to answer. We presented participants with pointillist-style paintings featuring discernible brushstrokes and asked them to rate their liking of each canvas when it was preceded by images priming a motor act either compatible or incompatible with the simulation of the artist’s movements. We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist’s painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference. These results support the hypothesis that involuntary covert painting simulation contributes to aesthetic appreciation during passive observation of artwork.

AB - The creation of an artwork requires motor activity. To what extent is art appreciation divorced from that activity and to what extent is it linked to it? That is the question which we set out to answer. We presented participants with pointillist-style paintings featuring discernible brushstrokes and asked them to rate their liking of each canvas when it was preceded by images priming a motor act either compatible or incompatible with the simulation of the artist’s movements. We show that action priming, when congruent with the artist’s painting style, enhanced aesthetic preference. These results support the hypothesis that involuntary covert painting simulation contributes to aesthetic appreciation during passive observation of artwork.

U2 - 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00391

DO - 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00391

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5161

M1 - 391

ER -

ID: 127674333