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ENERGY-TRANSDUCING PROPERTIES OF PRIMARY PROTON PUMPS RECONSTITUTED INTO ARCHAEAL BIPOLAR LIPID VESICLES

ELFERINK, MGL., DEWIT, JG., DRIESSEN, AJM. & KONINGS, WN., 15-Jun-1993, In : European Journal of Biochemistry. 214, 3, p. 917-925 9 p.

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  • Energy-transducing properties of primary proton pumps reconstituted into archaeal bipolar lipid vesicles

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DOI

Archaeal lipids differ considerably from eubacterial and eukaryotic lipids in their structure and physical properties. From the membranes of the extreme thermophilic archaea Sulfolobus acidocaldarius a tetraether lipid fraction was isolated, which can form closed and stable monolayer liposomes in aqueous media. The function of three different primary proton pumps originating from archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic lipid sources have been studied after reconstitution in these liposomes: bacteriorhodopsin from the archaea Halobacterium halobium; cytochrome-c oxidase from the thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus and cytochrome-c oxidase from beef heart mitochondria. Liposomes composed of tetraether lipids form a competent matrix for all three exogenous proton pumps. Bacteriorhodopsin was inserted inside-out in these liposomes, as normally observed in bilayer-forming lipid. The activities of the two oxidases were inhibited at high tetraether-lipid concentration, probably due to the low fluidity of these membranes. Only bacteriorhodopsin, which originates from diether archaeal lipids is fully functional in the tetraether membranes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)917-925
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Biochemistry
Volume214
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 15-Jun-1993

    Keywords

  • CYTOCHROME-C OXIDASE, STREPTOCOCCUS-CREMORIS, HALOBACTERIUM-HALOBIUM, MEMBRANE-VESICLES, TRANSPORT-SYSTEM, MOTIVE FORCE, BACTERIORHODOPSIN, PROTEIN, ARCHAEBACTERIA, PURIFICATION

ID: 6353130