Publication

Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset

Gimenez, M. C., Hessels, M., van de Werken, M., de Vries, B., Beersma, D. G. M. & Gordijn, M. C. M., 2010, In : Chronobiology International. 27, 6, p. 1219-1241 23 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Gimenez, M. C., Hessels, M., van de Werken, M., de Vries, B., Beersma, D. G. M., & Gordijn, M. C. M. (2010). Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset. Chronobiology International, 27(6), 1219-1241. https://doi.org/10.3109/07420528.2010.496912

Author

Gimenez, Marina C. ; Hessels, Martijn ; van de Werken, Maan ; de Vries, Bonnie ; Beersma, Domien G. M. ; Gordijn, Marijke C. M. / Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset. In: Chronobiology International. 2010 ; Vol. 27, No. 6. pp. 1219-1241.

Harvard

Gimenez, MC, Hessels, M, van de Werken, M, de Vries, B, Beersma, DGM & Gordijn, MCM 2010, 'Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset', Chronobiology International, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 1219-1241. https://doi.org/10.3109/07420528.2010.496912

Standard

Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset. / Gimenez, Marina C.; Hessels, Martijn; van de Werken, Maan; de Vries, Bonnie; Beersma, Domien G. M.; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.

In: Chronobiology International, Vol. 27, No. 6, 2010, p. 1219-1241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Gimenez MC, Hessels M, van de Werken M, de Vries B, Beersma DGM, Gordijn MCM. Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset. Chronobiology International. 2010;27(6):1219-1241. https://doi.org/10.3109/07420528.2010.496912


BibTeX

@article{7ba64b93da3d479db1889445f95f9c8c,
title = "Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset",
abstract = "The timing of work and social requirements has a negative impact on performance and well-being of a significant proportion of the population in our modern society due to a phenomenon known as social jetlag. During workdays, in the early morning, late chronotypes, in particular, suffer from a combination of a nonoptimal circadian phase and sleep deprivation. Sleep inertia, a transient period of lowered arousal after awakening, therefore, becomes more severe. In the present home study, the authors tested whether the use of an alarm clock with artificial dawn could reduce complaints of sleep inertia in people having difficulties in waking up early. The authors also examined whether these improvements were accompanied by a shift in the melatonin rhythm. Two studies were performed: Study 1: three conditions (0, 50, and 250 lux) and Study 2: two conditions (0 lux and self-selected dawn-light intensity). Each condition lasted 2 weeks. In both studies, the use of the artificial dawn resulted in a significant reduction of sleep inertia complaints. However, no significant shift in the onset of melatonin was observed after 2 weeks of using the artificial dawn of 250 lux or 50 lux compared to the control condition. A multilevel analysis revealed that only the presence of the artificial dawn, rather than shift in the dim light melatonin onset or timing of sleep offset, is related to the observed reduction of sleep inertia complaints. Mechanisms other than shift of circadian rhythms are needed to explain the positive results on sleep inertia of waking up with a dawn signal. (Author correspondence: m.c.gimenez@rug.nl)",
keywords = "Artificial dawn, Chronotype, Dim light melatonin onset, Sleep inertia, Human, Well-being, SHORT-WAVELENGTH LIGHT, SEASONAL AFFECTIVE-DISORDER, EVENING-TYPE INDIVIDUALS, CIRCADIAN TIMING SYSTEM, PHASE RESPONSE CURVE, BRIGHT LIGHT, MORNINGNESS-EVENINGNESS, HUMAN CHRONOTYPES, BODY-TEMPERATURE, HIGH-SENSITIVITY",
author = "Gimenez, {Marina C.} and Martijn Hessels and {van de Werken}, Maan and {de Vries}, Bonnie and Beersma, {Domien G. M.} and Gordijn, {Marijke C. M.}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.3109/07420528.2010.496912",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "1219--1241",
journal = "Chronobiology International",
issn = "1525-6073",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis Group",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of artificial dawn on subjective ratings of sleep inertia and dim light melatonin onset

AU - Gimenez, Marina C.

AU - Hessels, Martijn

AU - van de Werken, Maan

AU - de Vries, Bonnie

AU - Beersma, Domien G. M.

AU - Gordijn, Marijke C. M.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - The timing of work and social requirements has a negative impact on performance and well-being of a significant proportion of the population in our modern society due to a phenomenon known as social jetlag. During workdays, in the early morning, late chronotypes, in particular, suffer from a combination of a nonoptimal circadian phase and sleep deprivation. Sleep inertia, a transient period of lowered arousal after awakening, therefore, becomes more severe. In the present home study, the authors tested whether the use of an alarm clock with artificial dawn could reduce complaints of sleep inertia in people having difficulties in waking up early. The authors also examined whether these improvements were accompanied by a shift in the melatonin rhythm. Two studies were performed: Study 1: three conditions (0, 50, and 250 lux) and Study 2: two conditions (0 lux and self-selected dawn-light intensity). Each condition lasted 2 weeks. In both studies, the use of the artificial dawn resulted in a significant reduction of sleep inertia complaints. However, no significant shift in the onset of melatonin was observed after 2 weeks of using the artificial dawn of 250 lux or 50 lux compared to the control condition. A multilevel analysis revealed that only the presence of the artificial dawn, rather than shift in the dim light melatonin onset or timing of sleep offset, is related to the observed reduction of sleep inertia complaints. Mechanisms other than shift of circadian rhythms are needed to explain the positive results on sleep inertia of waking up with a dawn signal. (Author correspondence: m.c.gimenez@rug.nl)

AB - The timing of work and social requirements has a negative impact on performance and well-being of a significant proportion of the population in our modern society due to a phenomenon known as social jetlag. During workdays, in the early morning, late chronotypes, in particular, suffer from a combination of a nonoptimal circadian phase and sleep deprivation. Sleep inertia, a transient period of lowered arousal after awakening, therefore, becomes more severe. In the present home study, the authors tested whether the use of an alarm clock with artificial dawn could reduce complaints of sleep inertia in people having difficulties in waking up early. The authors also examined whether these improvements were accompanied by a shift in the melatonin rhythm. Two studies were performed: Study 1: three conditions (0, 50, and 250 lux) and Study 2: two conditions (0 lux and self-selected dawn-light intensity). Each condition lasted 2 weeks. In both studies, the use of the artificial dawn resulted in a significant reduction of sleep inertia complaints. However, no significant shift in the onset of melatonin was observed after 2 weeks of using the artificial dawn of 250 lux or 50 lux compared to the control condition. A multilevel analysis revealed that only the presence of the artificial dawn, rather than shift in the dim light melatonin onset or timing of sleep offset, is related to the observed reduction of sleep inertia complaints. Mechanisms other than shift of circadian rhythms are needed to explain the positive results on sleep inertia of waking up with a dawn signal. (Author correspondence: m.c.gimenez@rug.nl)

KW - Artificial dawn

KW - Chronotype

KW - Dim light melatonin onset

KW - Sleep inertia

KW - Human

KW - Well-being

KW - SHORT-WAVELENGTH LIGHT

KW - SEASONAL AFFECTIVE-DISORDER

KW - EVENING-TYPE INDIVIDUALS

KW - CIRCADIAN TIMING SYSTEM

KW - PHASE RESPONSE CURVE

KW - BRIGHT LIGHT

KW - MORNINGNESS-EVENINGNESS

KW - HUMAN CHRONOTYPES

KW - BODY-TEMPERATURE

KW - HIGH-SENSITIVITY

U2 - 10.3109/07420528.2010.496912

DO - 10.3109/07420528.2010.496912

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 1219

EP - 1241

JO - Chronobiology International

JF - Chronobiology International

SN - 1525-6073

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 5166010