Publication

Effect of Endotracheal Tube Size, Respiratory System Mechanics, and Ventilator Settings on Driving Pressure

Ilia, S., van Schelven, P. D., Koopman, A. A., Blokpoel, R. G. T., de Jager, P., Burgerhof, J. G. M., Markhorst, D. G. & Kneyber, M. C. J., Jan-2020, In : Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. 21, 1, p. E47-E51 5 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Copy link to clipboard

Documents

  • Effect of Endotracheal Tube Size, Respiratory System Mechanics, and Ventilator Settings on Driving Pressure

    Final publisher's version, 383 KB, PDF document

    Request copy

DOI

Objectives: We sought to investigate factors that affect the difference between the peak inspiratory pressure measured at the Y-piece under dynamic flow conditions and plateau pressure measured under zero-flow conditions (resistive pressure) during pressure controlled ventilation across a range of endotracheal tube sizes, respiratory mechanics, and ventilator settings. Design: In vitro study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients: None. Interventions: An in vitro bench model of the intubated respiratory system during pressure controlled ventilation was used to obtain the difference between peak inspiratory pressure measured at the Y-piece under dynamic flow conditions and plateau pressure measured under zero-flow conditions across a range of endotracheal tubes sizes (3.0-8.0 mm). Measurements were taken at combinations of pressure above positive end-expiratory pressure (10, 15, and 20 cm H2O), airway resistance (no, low, high), respiratory system compliance (ranging from normal to extremely severe), and inspiratory time at constant positive end-expiratory pressure (5 cm H2O). Multiple regression analysis was used to construct models predicting resistive pressure stratified by endotracheal tube size. Measurements and Main Results: On univariate regression analysis, respiratory system compliance (beta -1.5; 95% CI, -1.7 to -1.4; p <0.001), respiratory system resistance (beta 1.7; 95% CI, 1.5-2.0; p <0.001), pressure above positive end-expiratory pressure (beta 1.7; 95% CI, 1.4-2.0; p <0.001), and inspiratory time (beta -0.7; 95% CI, -1.0 to -0.4; p <0.001) were associated with resistive pressure. Multiple linear regression analysis showed the independent association between increasing respiratory system compliance, increasing airway resistance, increasing pressure above positive end-expiratory pressure, and decreasing inspiratory time and resistive pressure across all endotracheal tube sizes. Inspiratory time was the strongest variable associated with a proportional increase in resistive pressure. The contribution of airway resistance became more prominent with increasing endotracheal tube size. Conclusions: Peak inspiratory pressures measured during pressure controlled ventilation overestimated plateau pressure irrespective of endotracheal tube size, especially with decreased inspiratory time or increased airway resistance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E47-E51
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
Volume21
Issue number1
Early online date1-Nov-2019
Publication statusPublished - Jan-2020

    Keywords

  • driving pressure, in vitro techniques, mechanical ventilation, pediatric intensive care unit, pressure controlled ventilation, resistive pressure, ACUTE LUNG INJURY, VOLUME, CHILDREN, METAANALYSIS, MORTALITY

ID: 102028698