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Dengue Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Past and Recent Viral Transmission in Venezuela: A Comprehensive Community-Based Study

Velasco-Salas, Z. I., Sierra, G. M., Guzman, D. M., Zambrano, J., Vivas, D., Comach, G., Wilschut, J. C. & Tami, A., Nov-2014, In : American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 91, 5, p. 1039-1048 10 p.

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  • Dengue Seroprevalence and Risk Factors for Past and Recent Viral Transmission in Venezuela

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DOI

Dengue transmission in Venezuela has become perennial and a major public health problem. The increase in frequency and magnitude of recent epidemics prompted a comprehensive community-based cross-sectional study of 2,014 individuals in high-incidence neighborhoods of Maracay, Venezuela. We found a high seroprevalence (77.4%), with 10% of people experiencing recent infections. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that poverty-related socioeconomic factors (place and duration of residence, crowding, household size, and living in a shack) and factors/constraints related to intradomiciliary potential mosquito breeding sites (storing water and used tires) were linked with a greater risk of acquiring a dengue infection. Our results also suggest that transmission occurs mainly at home. The combination of increasingly crowded living conditions, growing population density, precarious homes, and water storage issues caused by enduring problems in public services in Maracay are the most likely factors that determine the permanent dengue transmission and the failure of vector control programs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1039-1048
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume91
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Nov-2014

    Keywords

  • HEMORRHAGIC-FEVER, AEDES-ALBOPICTUS, MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY, VIRUS-INFECTION, PUERTO-RICO, AMERICA, VECTOR, SCHOOLCHILDREN, ANTIBODIES, EVOLUTION

ID: 16080675