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Cost-effectiveness of aspirin treatment in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease events in subgroups based on age, gender, and varying cardiovascular risk

Greving, J. P., Buskens, E., Koffijberg, H. & Algra, A., 3-Jun-2008, In : Circulation. 117, 22, p. 2875-2883 9 p.

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Background-Aspirin is effective for the primary prevention of cardiovascular events, but it remains unclear for which subgroups of individuals aspirin is beneficial. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of aspirin separately for men and women of different ages with various levels of cardiovascular disease risk.

Methods and Results-A Markov model was developed to predict the number of cardiovascular events prevented, quality-adjusted life-years, and costs over a 10-year period. Event rates were taken from Dutch population data, and the relative effectiveness of aspirin was taken from a gender-specific meta-analysis. Sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to evaluate the robustness of the results. In 55-year-old persons, aspirin prevented myocardial infarctions in men (127 events per 100 000 person-years) and ischemic strokes in women (17 events per 100 000 person-years). Aspirin implies a net investment and a quality-adjusted life-year gain in men 55 years of age; the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was 111 949 euros per quality-adjusted life-year (1 euro = $1.27 as of June 2007). Aspirin was cost-effective for 55- and 65-year-old men with moderate cardiovascular risk and men 75 years of age (10-year cardiovascular disease risk > 10%). Conversely, aspirin was beneficial for women 65 years of age with high cardiovascular risk and women 75 years of age with moderate cardiovascular risk (10-year cardiovascular disease risk > 15%). Results were sensitive to drug treatment costs, effectiveness of aspirin treatment, and utility of taking aspirin.

Conclusions-Aspirin treatment for primary prevention is cost-effective for men with a 10-year cardiovascular disease risk of > 10% and for women with a risk of > 15%. This occurs much later in life for women than men. Therefore, opportunities for the primary prevention of aspirin seem limited in women, and a differentiated preventive strategy seems warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2875-2883
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume117
Issue number22
Publication statusPublished - 3-Jun-2008

    Keywords

  • aspirin, cardiovascular diseases, cost-benefit analysis, Markov chains, primary prevention, CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE, ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION, LONG-TERM SURVIVAL, LOW-DOSE ASPIRIN, SECONDARY PREVENTION, ECONOMIC-EVALUATION, RANDOMIZED TRIALS, UTILITY ANALYSIS, STROKE, METAANALYSIS

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