Publication

Comparison of health behaviours between cancer survivors and the general population: a cross-sectional analysis of the Lifelines cohort

Cortés-Ibáñez, F. O., Jaramillo-Calle, D. A., Vinke, P. C., Byambasukh, O., Corpeleijn, E., Sijtsma, A., Eulenburg, C., Vonk, J. M. & de Bock, G. H., Jun-2020, In : Journal of cancer survivorship-Research and practice. 14, 3, p. 377-385 9 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Purpose To compare the differences in lifestyle behaviours between cancer survivors (CSs) and cancer-free participants in a large and representative population-based cohort. Methods We included 115,257 adults from the Lifelines cohort. Cancer status was self-reported, and health behaviours were measured (e.g. body mass index [BMI]) or assessed by questionnaire (e.g. physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, sedentary behaviour and diet). The data were then categorised for logistic regression analysis, stratified and adjusted by sex and age (<55 vs >= 55 years). Results CSs (5473; 4.7%) were diagnosed 9 +/- 8.5 years before data collection, were older (mean age 55.4 vs 44.4 years) and more often female (66.6% vs 33.4%) than the cancer-free participants. They were also more likely to be physically active and to have a better diet, and also less likely to be alcohol drinkers; but, were more likely to have a higher BMI, be former smokers and to be sedentary. After adjustment for sex and age, however, BMI was more likely to be normal, physical activity was more likely to be higher and smoking to be prevalent in CSs. Current smoking was also significantly higher among females and those aged <55 years who were CSs than for those with no history of cancer. Conclusions In this population-based cohort, CSs have health behaviour comparable to those without a cancer diagnosis. Implications for cancer survivors Smoking cessation strategies should target all CSs, but efforts could yield greatest benefit if they target females and those younger than 55 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377-385
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of cancer survivorship-Research and practice
Volume14
Issue number3
Early online date14-Jan-2020
Publication statusPublished - Jun-2020

    Keywords

  • Neoplasms, Prevalence, Lifestyle, Health behaviour, Risk factors, Survivors, LIFE-STYLE FACTORS, ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION, COMBINED IMPACT, RISK, BREAST, METAANALYSES, MORTALITY, SMOKING, DIET, CARE

Download statistics

No data available

ID: 112104297