Publication

Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic: how to achieve an optimal casemix?

Schoon, Y., Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, M. E., Scheffer, A. C., Van Rooij, F. J. M., Rikkert, M. G. M. O. & De Rooij, S. E., Feb-2011, In : The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging. 15, 2, p. 140-5 6 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Schoon, Y., Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, M. E., Scheffer, A. C., Van Rooij, F. J. M., Rikkert, M. G. M. O., & De Rooij, S. E. (2011). Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic: how to achieve an optimal casemix? The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 15(2), 140-5. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-011-0027-3

Author

Schoon, Y. ; Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, M. E. ; Scheffer, A. C. ; Van Rooij, F. J. M. ; Rikkert, M. G. M. Olde ; De Rooij, S. E. / Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic : how to achieve an optimal casemix?. In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging. 2011 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 140-5.

Harvard

Schoon, Y, Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, ME, Scheffer, AC, Van Rooij, FJM, Rikkert, MGMO & De Rooij, SE 2011, 'Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic: how to achieve an optimal casemix?', The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 140-5. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-011-0027-3

Standard

Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic : how to achieve an optimal casemix? / Schoon, Y.; Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, M. E.; Scheffer, A. C.; Van Rooij, F. J. M.; Rikkert, M. G. M. Olde; De Rooij, S. E.

In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, Vol. 15, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 140-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Schoon Y, Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde ME, Scheffer AC, Van Rooij FJM, Rikkert MGMO, De Rooij SE. Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic: how to achieve an optimal casemix? The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging. 2011 Feb;15(2):140-5. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-011-0027-3


BibTeX

@article{98ee13316ef14d4d85893fd3c443590f,
title = "Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic: how to achieve an optimal casemix?",
abstract = "UNLABELLED: OBJECTIVE To study the potential differences in patient characteristics between two referral methods to a fall clinic, specifically: case-finding of patients admitted to an emergency department because of a fall, compared to direct referral to the fall clinic via the general practitioner.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Fall clinics in two university teaching hospitals in the Netherlands.PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred community-dwelling older people aged 65 years or over currently attending the fall clinics in Nijmegen (Group 1, n=154) and in Amsterdam (Group 2, n=146).MEASUREMENTS: Patients were referred by a general practitioner (Group 1) or were selected using the Carefall Triage Instrument (CTI) after visiting the emergency department (Group 2). In all patients, modifiable risk factors for recurrent falls were assessed.RESULTS: Group 1 had less modifiable risk factors for falling (a mean of 4 (SD 1.6) vs. a mean of 5 (SD 1.5) in Group 2, p < 0.001). Compared to Group 2, Group 1 had more prevalent {"} recurrent falling (≥ 2 falls){"} (p=0.001) and {"}assisted living in homes for the aged{"} (p=0.037). {"}Fear of falling{"}, {"}mobility and balance problems{"}, {"}home hazards{"} and {"}osteoporosis{"} were significantly less prevalent in Group 1.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that patients referred to a multidisciplinary fall prevention clinic by their general practitioner have a different risk profile than those selected by case finding using the CTI. These differences have consequences for the reach of secondary care for fall-preventive interventions and will probably influence the effectiveness and efficiency of a fall prevention program.",
keywords = "Accidental Falls, Aged, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diagnosis-Related Groups, Emergency Service, Hospital, Female, General Practice, Humans, Male, Netherlands, Prevalence, Recurrence, Referral and Consultation, Risk Factors, Comparative Study, Journal Article",
author = "Y. Schoon and Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, {M. E.} and Scheffer, {A. C.} and {Van Rooij}, {F. J. M.} and Rikkert, {M. G. M. Olde} and {De Rooij}, {S. E.}",
year = "2011",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1007/s12603-011-0027-3",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "140--5",
journal = "The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging",
issn = "1279-7707",
publisher = "SPRINGER FRANCE",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of different strategies of referral to a fall clinic

T2 - how to achieve an optimal casemix?

AU - Schoon, Y.

AU - Hoogsteen-Ossewaarde, M. E.

AU - Scheffer, A. C.

AU - Van Rooij, F. J. M.

AU - Rikkert, M. G. M. Olde

AU - De Rooij, S. E.

PY - 2011/2

Y1 - 2011/2

N2 - UNLABELLED: OBJECTIVE To study the potential differences in patient characteristics between two referral methods to a fall clinic, specifically: case-finding of patients admitted to an emergency department because of a fall, compared to direct referral to the fall clinic via the general practitioner.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Fall clinics in two university teaching hospitals in the Netherlands.PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred community-dwelling older people aged 65 years or over currently attending the fall clinics in Nijmegen (Group 1, n=154) and in Amsterdam (Group 2, n=146).MEASUREMENTS: Patients were referred by a general practitioner (Group 1) or were selected using the Carefall Triage Instrument (CTI) after visiting the emergency department (Group 2). In all patients, modifiable risk factors for recurrent falls were assessed.RESULTS: Group 1 had less modifiable risk factors for falling (a mean of 4 (SD 1.6) vs. a mean of 5 (SD 1.5) in Group 2, p < 0.001). Compared to Group 2, Group 1 had more prevalent " recurrent falling (≥ 2 falls)" (p=0.001) and "assisted living in homes for the aged" (p=0.037). "Fear of falling", "mobility and balance problems", "home hazards" and "osteoporosis" were significantly less prevalent in Group 1.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that patients referred to a multidisciplinary fall prevention clinic by their general practitioner have a different risk profile than those selected by case finding using the CTI. These differences have consequences for the reach of secondary care for fall-preventive interventions and will probably influence the effectiveness and efficiency of a fall prevention program.

AB - UNLABELLED: OBJECTIVE To study the potential differences in patient characteristics between two referral methods to a fall clinic, specifically: case-finding of patients admitted to an emergency department because of a fall, compared to direct referral to the fall clinic via the general practitioner.DESIGN: Cross-sectional study.SETTING: Fall clinics in two university teaching hospitals in the Netherlands.PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred community-dwelling older people aged 65 years or over currently attending the fall clinics in Nijmegen (Group 1, n=154) and in Amsterdam (Group 2, n=146).MEASUREMENTS: Patients were referred by a general practitioner (Group 1) or were selected using the Carefall Triage Instrument (CTI) after visiting the emergency department (Group 2). In all patients, modifiable risk factors for recurrent falls were assessed.RESULTS: Group 1 had less modifiable risk factors for falling (a mean of 4 (SD 1.6) vs. a mean of 5 (SD 1.5) in Group 2, p < 0.001). Compared to Group 2, Group 1 had more prevalent " recurrent falling (≥ 2 falls)" (p=0.001) and "assisted living in homes for the aged" (p=0.037). "Fear of falling", "mobility and balance problems", "home hazards" and "osteoporosis" were significantly less prevalent in Group 1.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that patients referred to a multidisciplinary fall prevention clinic by their general practitioner have a different risk profile than those selected by case finding using the CTI. These differences have consequences for the reach of secondary care for fall-preventive interventions and will probably influence the effectiveness and efficiency of a fall prevention program.

KW - Accidental Falls

KW - Aged

KW - Cross-Sectional Studies

KW - Diagnosis-Related Groups

KW - Emergency Service, Hospital

KW - Female

KW - General Practice

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Netherlands

KW - Prevalence

KW - Recurrence

KW - Referral and Consultation

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1007/s12603-011-0027-3

DO - 10.1007/s12603-011-0027-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 21365168

VL - 15

SP - 140

EP - 145

JO - The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging

JF - The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging

SN - 1279-7707

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 34346301