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Cognitive performance in depressed older persons: the impact of vascular burden and remission. A two-year follow-up study

Zuidersma, M., Comijs, H. C., Naarding, P. & Oude Voshaar, R. C., Sep-2016, In : International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. 31, 9, p. 1029-1039 11 p.

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  • Cognitive performance in depressed older persons the impact of vascular

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Objectives: Depression is associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline. The present study compared two-year change in cognitive performance between depressed older persons and a non-depressed control group, between remitted and non-remitted patients, and evaluated whether vascular burden at baseline was associated with more cognitive decline in depressed older persons.

Methods: Depressed patients (n = 378) aged >= 60 were recruited from mental healthcare institutes and general practices, and a non-depressed control group (n = 132) was recruited from general practices. A DSM-IV depressive episode was established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and processing speed, working memory, verbal memory and interference control were evaluated with three neurocognitive tasks at baseline and 2 years later. A modified Framingham Risk Score, anklebrachial index, and history of a vascular event defined vascular burden at baseline.

Results: After adjusting for baseline cognitive performance, age, sex, and education level, depressed older persons had worse processing speed and verbal memory scores at follow-up than controls (regression coefficients: -0.172; p = 0.042 and -0.309; p = 0.001, respectively) but did not differ in the other two-cognitive outcomes. In the sample of depressed patients, remission status at 2 years follow-up and baseline vascular burden did not predict cognitive performance at follow-up, after adjustment for baseline cognitive performance, age, sex and education level.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that cognitive deficits in depressed older persons are not just a manifestation of depression. In addition, vascular burden was not associated with worse cognitive decline in a sample of depressed older persons. Copyright (C) 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1029-1039
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Volume31
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep-2016

    Keywords

  • processing speed, working memory, verbal memory, interference control, depression remission, vascular risk, LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION, WHITE-MATTER HYPERINTENSITIES, CEREBROVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS, NURSING-HOME ADMISSION, MAJOR DEPRESSION, HIPPOCAMPAL VOLUME, ALZHEIMER-DISEASE, EXCESS MORTALITY, CORTISOL-LEVELS, IMPAIRMENT

ID: 38521389