Publication

CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY

JOOSTEN, AAJ., JANSEN, HML., PIERS, DA., MINDERHOUD, JM. & KORF, J., Aug-1995, In : Nuclear Medicine Communications. 16, 8, p. 703-705 3 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

JOOSTEN, AAJ., JANSEN, HML., PIERS, DA., MINDERHOUD, JM., & KORF, J. (1995). CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY. Nuclear Medicine Communications, 16(8), 703-705.

Author

JOOSTEN, AAJ ; JANSEN, HML ; PIERS, DA ; MINDERHOUD, JM ; KORF, J. / CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY. In: Nuclear Medicine Communications. 1995 ; Vol. 16, No. 8. pp. 703-705.

Harvard

JOOSTEN, AAJ, JANSEN, HML, PIERS, DA, MINDERHOUD, JM & KORF, J 1995, 'CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY', Nuclear Medicine Communications, vol. 16, no. 8, pp. 703-705.

Standard

CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY. / JOOSTEN, AAJ; JANSEN, HML; PIERS, DA; MINDERHOUD, JM; KORF, J.

In: Nuclear Medicine Communications, Vol. 16, No. 8, 08.1995, p. 703-705.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

JOOSTEN AAJ, JANSEN HML, PIERS DA, MINDERHOUD JM, KORF J. CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY. Nuclear Medicine Communications. 1995 Aug;16(8):703-705.


BibTeX

@article{4c85cb9be5844d8b801e7446c2e68776,
title = "CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY",
abstract = "Multiple sclerosis (MS) is predominantly a progressive immune-mediated disease of the white matter in the brain. We used single photon emission tomography (SPET) and cobalt-57 (Co-57) as a calcium (Ca) analogue to visualize brain tissue damage, based on the fact that Ca influx occurs in both cell death and T-lymphocyte activation in MS. The aim of this study was to determine if Co-57-SPET detects MS lesions and, if so, to compare this with clinical data on the patient. Five MS patients underwent neurological examination including Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) assessment and Co-57-SPET, using a single-headed camera. All available data were compared. The lesions were recognized as areas of increased signal intensity, although the poor count rate did not allow any statistical quantification. A relationship between one Co-57-SPET parameter (cobalt plaque load) and EDSS was demonstrated. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that Co-57-SPET using a single-headed camera is not an appropriate imaging modality in MS. To obtain a more favourable signal-to-noise ratio, the use of a multi-headed camera, the administration of a higher activity of Co-57 and. longer acquisition time are recommended. Validation of this method among a larger group of patients and a comparison with healthy volunteers is needed.",
author = "AAJ JOOSTEN and HML JANSEN and DA PIERS and JM MINDERHOUD and J KORF",
year = "1995",
month = "8",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "703--705",
journal = "Nuclear Medicine Communications",
issn = "0143-3636",
publisher = "LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - CO-57 SPET IN RELAPSING-PROGRESSIVE MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS - A PILOT-STUDY

AU - JOOSTEN, AAJ

AU - JANSEN, HML

AU - PIERS, DA

AU - MINDERHOUD, JM

AU - KORF, J

PY - 1995/8

Y1 - 1995/8

N2 - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is predominantly a progressive immune-mediated disease of the white matter in the brain. We used single photon emission tomography (SPET) and cobalt-57 (Co-57) as a calcium (Ca) analogue to visualize brain tissue damage, based on the fact that Ca influx occurs in both cell death and T-lymphocyte activation in MS. The aim of this study was to determine if Co-57-SPET detects MS lesions and, if so, to compare this with clinical data on the patient. Five MS patients underwent neurological examination including Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) assessment and Co-57-SPET, using a single-headed camera. All available data were compared. The lesions were recognized as areas of increased signal intensity, although the poor count rate did not allow any statistical quantification. A relationship between one Co-57-SPET parameter (cobalt plaque load) and EDSS was demonstrated. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that Co-57-SPET using a single-headed camera is not an appropriate imaging modality in MS. To obtain a more favourable signal-to-noise ratio, the use of a multi-headed camera, the administration of a higher activity of Co-57 and. longer acquisition time are recommended. Validation of this method among a larger group of patients and a comparison with healthy volunteers is needed.

AB - Multiple sclerosis (MS) is predominantly a progressive immune-mediated disease of the white matter in the brain. We used single photon emission tomography (SPET) and cobalt-57 (Co-57) as a calcium (Ca) analogue to visualize brain tissue damage, based on the fact that Ca influx occurs in both cell death and T-lymphocyte activation in MS. The aim of this study was to determine if Co-57-SPET detects MS lesions and, if so, to compare this with clinical data on the patient. Five MS patients underwent neurological examination including Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) assessment and Co-57-SPET, using a single-headed camera. All available data were compared. The lesions were recognized as areas of increased signal intensity, although the poor count rate did not allow any statistical quantification. A relationship between one Co-57-SPET parameter (cobalt plaque load) and EDSS was demonstrated. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that Co-57-SPET using a single-headed camera is not an appropriate imaging modality in MS. To obtain a more favourable signal-to-noise ratio, the use of a multi-headed camera, the administration of a higher activity of Co-57 and. longer acquisition time are recommended. Validation of this method among a larger group of patients and a comparison with healthy volunteers is needed.

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 703

EP - 705

JO - Nuclear Medicine Communications

JF - Nuclear Medicine Communications

SN - 0143-3636

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 6434646