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Cellular senescence and the aging brain

Chinta, S. J., Woods, G., Rane, A., Demaria, M., Campisi, J. & Andersen, J. K., Aug-2015, In : Experimental Gerontology. 68, p. 3-7 5 p.

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  • Cellular senescence and the aging brain

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DOI

  • Shankar J Chinta
  • Georgia Woods
  • Anand Rane
  • Marco Demaria
  • Judith Campisi
  • Julie K Andersen

Cellular senescence is a potent anti-cancer mechanism that arrests the proliferation of mitotically competent cells to prevent malignant transformation. Senescent cells accumulate with age in a variety of human and mouse tissues where they express a complex 'senescence-associated secretory phenotype' (SASP). The SASP includes many pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and proteases that have the potential to cause or exacerbate age-related pathology, both degenerative and hyperplastic. While cellular senescence in peripheral tissues has recently been linked to a number of age-related pathologies, its involvement in brain aging is just beginning to be explored. Recent data generated by several laboratories suggest that both aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by an increase in SASP-expressing senescent cells of non-neuronal origin in the brain. Moreover, this increase correlates with neurodegeneration. Senescent cells in the brain could therefore constitute novel therapeutic targets for treating age-related neuropathologies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-7
Number of pages5
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume68
Publication statusPublished - Aug-2015
Externally publishedYes

    Keywords

  • INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE SECRETION, DNA-DAMAGE RESPONSE, IN-VIVO, NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES, MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS, IONIZING-RADIATION, GROWTH ARREST, CELLS, MICROGLIA, ASTROCYTES

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