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Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in wildlife, food-producing, and companion animals: a systematic review

Köck, R., Daniels-Haardt, I., Becker, K., Mellmann, A., Friedrich, A. W., Mevius, D., Schwarz, S. & Jurke, A., Dec-2018, In : Clinical Microbiology and Infection. 24, 12, p. 1241-1250 10 p.

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  • Carbapenem-resistantEnterobacteriaceaein wildlife, food-producing,and companion animals a systematic review

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DOI

  • R Köck
  • I Daniels-Haardt
  • K Becker
  • A Mellmann
  • A W Friedrich
  • D Mevius
  • S Schwarz
  • A Jurke

Objectives: The spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in healthcare settings challenges clinicians worldwide. However, little is known about dissemination of CRE in livestock, food, and companion animals and potential transmission to humans.

Methods: We performed a systematic review of all studies published in the PubMed database between 1980 and 2017 and included those reporting the occurrence of CRE in samples from food-producing and companion animals, wildlife, and exposed humans. The primary outcome was the occurrence of CRE in samples from these animals; secondary outcomes included the prevalence of CRE, carbapenemase types, CRE genotypes, and antimicrobial susceptibilities.

Results: We identified 68 articles describing CRE among pigs, poultry, cattle, seafood, dogs, cats, horses, pet birds, swallows, wild boars, wild stork, gulls, and black kites in Africa, America, Asia, Australia, and Europe. The following carbapenemases have been detected (predominantly affecting the genera Escherichia and Klebsiella): VIM, KPC, NDM, OXA, and IMP. Two studies found that 33-67% of exposed humans on poultry farms carried carbapenemase-producing CRE closely related to isolates from the farm environment. Twenty-seven studies selectively screened samples for CRE and found a prevalence of

Conclusions: The occurrence of CRE in livestock, seafood, wildlife, pets, and directly exposed humans poses a risk for public health. Prospective prevalence studies using molecular and cultural microbiological methods are needed to better define the scope and transmission of CRE. (c) 2018 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1241-1250
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume24
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Dec-2018

    Keywords

  • Antibiotic resistance, Carbapenemase, Enterobacteriales, Epidemiology, Livestock, Zoonosis, SPECTRUM-BETA-LACTAMASE, GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA, ESCHERICHIA-COLI, EXTENDED-SPECTRUM, KLEBSIELLA-PNEUMONIAE, ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY, MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION, STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS, SALMONELLA, FARMS

ID: 61199504