Publication

Brains in context in the neurolaw debate: The examples of free will and "dangerous" brains

Schleim, S., 2012, In : International Journal of Law and Psychiatry. 35, 2, p. 104-111 8 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Schleim, S. (2012). Brains in context in the neurolaw debate: The examples of free will and "dangerous" brains. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 35(2), 104-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlp.2012.01.001

Author

Schleim, S. / Brains in context in the neurolaw debate : The examples of free will and "dangerous" brains. In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 104-111.

Harvard

Schleim, S 2012, 'Brains in context in the neurolaw debate: The examples of free will and "dangerous" brains', International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, vol. 35, no. 2, pp. 104-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlp.2012.01.001

Standard

Brains in context in the neurolaw debate : The examples of free will and "dangerous" brains. / Schleim, S.

In: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, Vol. 35, No. 2, 2012, p. 104-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Schleim S. Brains in context in the neurolaw debate: The examples of free will and "dangerous" brains. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry. 2012;35(2):104-111. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijlp.2012.01.001


BibTeX

@article{ec7f61baa4364d5d9eeab484c28f7f14,
title = "Brains in context in the neurolaw debate: The examples of free will and {"}dangerous{"} brains",
abstract = "Will neuroscience revolutionize forensic practice and our legal institutions? In the debate about the legal implications of brain research, free will and the neural bases of antisocial or criminal behavior are of central importance. By analyzing frequently quoted examples for the unconscious determinants of behavior and antisocial personality changes caused by brain lesions in a wider psychological and social context, the paper argues for a cautious middle position: Evidence for an impending normative {"}neuro-revolution{"} is scarce and neuroscience may instead gradually improve legal practice in the long run, particularly where normative questions directly pertain to brain-related questions. In the conclusion the paper raises concerns that applying neuroscience methods about an individual's responsibility or dangerousness is premature at the present time and carries serious individual and societal risks. Putting findings from brain research in wider contexts renders them empirically investigable in a way that does not neglect psychological and social aspects of human mind and behavior. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Neurolaw, Neuroethics, Free will, Legal responsibility, Ventromedial prefrontal cortex, Phineas Gage, FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY, CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY, NEUROSCIENCE, LAW, BEHAVIOR, SCIENCE, ABNORMALITIES, INDIVIDUALS, PERSONALITY, CHALLENGES",
author = "S. Schleim",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijlp.2012.01.001",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "104--111",
journal = "International Journal of Law and Psychiatry",
issn = "0160-2527",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Brains in context in the neurolaw debate

T2 - The examples of free will and "dangerous" brains

AU - Schleim, S.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Will neuroscience revolutionize forensic practice and our legal institutions? In the debate about the legal implications of brain research, free will and the neural bases of antisocial or criminal behavior are of central importance. By analyzing frequently quoted examples for the unconscious determinants of behavior and antisocial personality changes caused by brain lesions in a wider psychological and social context, the paper argues for a cautious middle position: Evidence for an impending normative "neuro-revolution" is scarce and neuroscience may instead gradually improve legal practice in the long run, particularly where normative questions directly pertain to brain-related questions. In the conclusion the paper raises concerns that applying neuroscience methods about an individual's responsibility or dangerousness is premature at the present time and carries serious individual and societal risks. Putting findings from brain research in wider contexts renders them empirically investigable in a way that does not neglect psychological and social aspects of human mind and behavior. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - Will neuroscience revolutionize forensic practice and our legal institutions? In the debate about the legal implications of brain research, free will and the neural bases of antisocial or criminal behavior are of central importance. By analyzing frequently quoted examples for the unconscious determinants of behavior and antisocial personality changes caused by brain lesions in a wider psychological and social context, the paper argues for a cautious middle position: Evidence for an impending normative "neuro-revolution" is scarce and neuroscience may instead gradually improve legal practice in the long run, particularly where normative questions directly pertain to brain-related questions. In the conclusion the paper raises concerns that applying neuroscience methods about an individual's responsibility or dangerousness is premature at the present time and carries serious individual and societal risks. Putting findings from brain research in wider contexts renders them empirically investigable in a way that does not neglect psychological and social aspects of human mind and behavior. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Neurolaw

KW - Neuroethics

KW - Free will

KW - Legal responsibility

KW - Ventromedial prefrontal cortex

KW - Phineas Gage

KW - FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY

KW - CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY

KW - NEUROSCIENCE

KW - LAW

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - SCIENCE

KW - ABNORMALITIES

KW - INDIVIDUALS

KW - PERSONALITY

KW - CHALLENGES

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijlp.2012.01.001

DO - 10.1016/j.ijlp.2012.01.001

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 104

EP - 111

JO - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry

JF - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry

SN - 0160-2527

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 2279493