Publication

Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides

Roeser, J., Alting, N. F. A., Permentier, H. P., Bruins, A. P. & Bischoff, R., 16-Jul-2013, In : Analytical Chemistry. 85, 14, p. 6626-6632 7 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Roeser, J., Alting, N. F. A., Permentier, H. P., Bruins, A. P., & Bischoff, R. (2013). Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides. Analytical Chemistry, 85(14), 6626-6632. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac303795c

Author

Roeser, Julien ; Alting, Niels F. A. ; Permentier, Hjalmar P. ; Bruins, Andries P. ; Bischoff, Rainer. / Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides. In: Analytical Chemistry. 2013 ; Vol. 85, No. 14. pp. 6626-6632.

Harvard

Roeser, J, Alting, NFA, Permentier, HP, Bruins, AP & Bischoff, R 2013, 'Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides', Analytical Chemistry, vol. 85, no. 14, pp. 6626-6632. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac303795c

Standard

Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides. / Roeser, Julien; Alting, Niels F. A.; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 85, No. 14, 16.07.2013, p. 6626-6632.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Roeser J, Alting NFA, Permentier HP, Bruins AP, Bischoff R. Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides. Analytical Chemistry. 2013 Jul 16;85(14):6626-6632. https://doi.org/10.1021/ac303795c


BibTeX

@article{c3143de587d449e68e494f9ec1f7cd85,
title = "Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides",
abstract = "Electrochemical oxidation of peptides and proteins is traditionally performed on carbon-based electrodes. Adsorption caused by the affinity of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids toward these surfaces leads to electrode fouling. We compared the performance of boron-doped diamond (BDD) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes for the electrochemical oxidation and cleavage of peptides. An optimal working potential of 2000 mV was chosen to ensure oxidation of peptides on BDD by electron transfer processes only. Oxidation by electrogenerated OH radicals took place above 2500 mV on BDD, which is undesirable if cleavage of a peptide is to be achieved. BDD showed improved cleavage yield and reduced adsorption for a set of small peptides, some of which had been previously shown to undergo electrochemical cleavage C-terminal to tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) on porous carbon electrodes. Repeated oxidation with BDD electrodes resulted in progressively lower conversion yields due to a change in surface termination. Cathodic pretreatment of BDD at a negative potential in an acidic environment successfully regenerated the electrode surface and allowed for repeatable reactions over extended periods of time. BDD electrodes are a promising alternative to GC electrodes in terms of reduced adsorption and fouling and the possibility to regenerate them for consistent high-yield electrochemical cleavage of peptides. The fact that OH-radicals can be produced by anodic oxidation of water at elevated positive potentials is an additional advantage as they allow another set of oxidative reactions in analogy to the Fenton reaction, thus widening the scope of electrochemistry in protein and peptide chemistry and analytics.",
keywords = "MASS-SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION, THIN-FILM ELECTRODES, VOLTAMMETRIC DETERMINATION, CYTOCHROME-C, TYROSINE, PROTEINS, TRYPTOPHAN, BEHAVIOR",
author = "Julien Roeser and Alting, {Niels F. A.} and Permentier, {Hjalmar P.} and Bruins, {Andries P.} and Rainer Bischoff",
year = "2013",
month = jul,
day = "16",
doi = "10.1021/ac303795c",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "6626--6632",
journal = "Analytical Chemistry",
issn = "0003-2700",
publisher = "AMER CHEMICAL SOC INC",
number = "14",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes for the Electrochemical Oxidation and Cleavage of Peptides

AU - Roeser, Julien

AU - Alting, Niels F. A.

AU - Permentier, Hjalmar P.

AU - Bruins, Andries P.

AU - Bischoff, Rainer

PY - 2013/7/16

Y1 - 2013/7/16

N2 - Electrochemical oxidation of peptides and proteins is traditionally performed on carbon-based electrodes. Adsorption caused by the affinity of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids toward these surfaces leads to electrode fouling. We compared the performance of boron-doped diamond (BDD) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes for the electrochemical oxidation and cleavage of peptides. An optimal working potential of 2000 mV was chosen to ensure oxidation of peptides on BDD by electron transfer processes only. Oxidation by electrogenerated OH radicals took place above 2500 mV on BDD, which is undesirable if cleavage of a peptide is to be achieved. BDD showed improved cleavage yield and reduced adsorption for a set of small peptides, some of which had been previously shown to undergo electrochemical cleavage C-terminal to tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) on porous carbon electrodes. Repeated oxidation with BDD electrodes resulted in progressively lower conversion yields due to a change in surface termination. Cathodic pretreatment of BDD at a negative potential in an acidic environment successfully regenerated the electrode surface and allowed for repeatable reactions over extended periods of time. BDD electrodes are a promising alternative to GC electrodes in terms of reduced adsorption and fouling and the possibility to regenerate them for consistent high-yield electrochemical cleavage of peptides. The fact that OH-radicals can be produced by anodic oxidation of water at elevated positive potentials is an additional advantage as they allow another set of oxidative reactions in analogy to the Fenton reaction, thus widening the scope of electrochemistry in protein and peptide chemistry and analytics.

AB - Electrochemical oxidation of peptides and proteins is traditionally performed on carbon-based electrodes. Adsorption caused by the affinity of hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids toward these surfaces leads to electrode fouling. We compared the performance of boron-doped diamond (BDD) and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes for the electrochemical oxidation and cleavage of peptides. An optimal working potential of 2000 mV was chosen to ensure oxidation of peptides on BDD by electron transfer processes only. Oxidation by electrogenerated OH radicals took place above 2500 mV on BDD, which is undesirable if cleavage of a peptide is to be achieved. BDD showed improved cleavage yield and reduced adsorption for a set of small peptides, some of which had been previously shown to undergo electrochemical cleavage C-terminal to tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) on porous carbon electrodes. Repeated oxidation with BDD electrodes resulted in progressively lower conversion yields due to a change in surface termination. Cathodic pretreatment of BDD at a negative potential in an acidic environment successfully regenerated the electrode surface and allowed for repeatable reactions over extended periods of time. BDD electrodes are a promising alternative to GC electrodes in terms of reduced adsorption and fouling and the possibility to regenerate them for consistent high-yield electrochemical cleavage of peptides. The fact that OH-radicals can be produced by anodic oxidation of water at elevated positive potentials is an additional advantage as they allow another set of oxidative reactions in analogy to the Fenton reaction, thus widening the scope of electrochemistry in protein and peptide chemistry and analytics.

KW - MASS-SPECTROMETRIC DETECTION

KW - THIN-FILM ELECTRODES

KW - VOLTAMMETRIC DETERMINATION

KW - CYTOCHROME-C

KW - TYROSINE

KW - PROTEINS

KW - TRYPTOPHAN

KW - BEHAVIOR

U2 - 10.1021/ac303795c

DO - 10.1021/ac303795c

M3 - Article

VL - 85

SP - 6626

EP - 6632

JO - Analytical Chemistry

JF - Analytical Chemistry

SN - 0003-2700

IS - 14

ER -

ID: 5918787