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Behavioral and physiological consequences of repeated daily intracerebroventricular injection of corticotropin-releasing factor in the rat

Buwalda, B., van Kalkeren, A. A., de Boer, S. F. & Koolhaas, J. M., Apr-1998, In : Psychoneuroendocrinology. 23, 3, p. 205 - 218 14 p.

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DOI

The present study was conducted to investigate the long-term consequences of repeated daily bolus injections of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) intracerebroventricularly (ICV) on ongoing locomotor activity and physiology in the home cage of individually housed rats. For this purpose ovine CRF (1 mu g/3 mu l) was injected once daily during the early resting phase into the lateral ventricle for a period of 10 days. Changes in daily rhythms in heart rate, body temperature and motor activity were recorded telemetrically before and during the treatment period. Daily central CRF injection delayed the body weight gain, increased adrenal weight, and decreased the weight of the thymus at the end of the experiment. The acute behavioral and physiological responses to CRF did not habituate with repetition of treatment. CRF treatment also failed to affect the long-term regulation of baseline heart rate, body temperature and motor activity during the light phase, as measured during the hour preceding the daily CRF injection. Mean heart rate during the dark phase was, however, significantly decreased in CRF-treated rats during the whole experimental 10-day period, without any sign of habituation. The failure of episodic CRF to affect long-term regulation of baseline body temperature during the light as well as the dark phase was noteworthy because an increased daytime body temperature lasting for several days is a characteristic marker of various behavioral stressors. Since a previous study showed that the temperature response during chronic CRF infusion was similar to the long-term effects of behavioral stress it is hypothesized that chronic but nor episodic increases in central CRF levels are related to the induction and persistence of part of the stress-related behavioral and physiological disorders. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205 - 218
Number of pages14
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume23
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Apr-1998

    Keywords

  • CRF or CRH, brain, stress, telemetry, body temperature, activity, daily rhythm, FACTOR-LIKE IMMUNOREACTIVITY, SINGLE SOCIAL DEFEAT, BRAIN-REGIONS, FACTOR ANTAGONIST, STRESS RESPONSES, MESSENGER-RNA, HORMONE, CRF, ACTIVATION, RHYTHMS

ID: 780411