Publication

Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers

Krammer, S. M. S., Jan-2014, In : Technological Forecasting and Social Change. 81, p. 272-286 15 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

APA

Krammer, S. M. S. (2014). Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 81, 272-286. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2013.02.006

Author

Krammer, Sorin M. S. / Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers. In: Technological Forecasting and Social Change. 2014 ; Vol. 81. pp. 272-286.

Harvard

Krammer, SMS 2014, 'Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers', Technological Forecasting and Social Change, vol. 81, pp. 272-286. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2013.02.006

Standard

Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers. / Krammer, Sorin M. S.

In: Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Vol. 81, 01.2014, p. 272-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Vancouver

Krammer SMS. Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers. Technological Forecasting and Social Change. 2014 Jan;81:272-286. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2013.02.006


BibTeX

@article{688d9bc61d53477bbade676ff98aac97,
title = "Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers",
abstract = "With ever increasing global integration, productivity improvements depend not only on in-house innovative efforts, but on those of international partners as well. This paper explores the impact of foreign R&D on productivity and technical efficiency of countries by considering three channels of embodied and disembodied spillovers, namely trade, foreign direct investment and patenting, and controlling for the direct licensing of foreign technologies. Furthermore, it contrasts these effects across 47 developed and transition countries between 1990 and 2009. Overall, I find that trade remains the dominant factor behind productivity and technical progress, while the effects of FDI- and patent-related spillovers are significantly smaller. The effect of foreign patenting is larger in developed nations while imports, inward FDI and foreign technology licensing are important sources of know-how for transition economies. The aggregate gains from spillovers appear larger for latter, confirming their significance in the process of development and catching-up. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "R&D spillovers, Trade, FDI, Patents, Licensing, RESEARCH-AND-DEVELOPMENT, FOREIGN DIRECT-INVESTMENT, FINITE-SAMPLE PROPERTIES, KNOWLEDGE SPILLOVERS, ECONOMIC-GROWTH, DOMESTIC FIRMS, HETEROGENEOUS PANELS, PRODUCTIVITY, TRADE, INNOVATION",
author = "Krammer, {Sorin M. S.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.techfore.2013.02.006",
language = "English",
volume = "81",
pages = "272--286",
journal = "Technological Forecasting and Social Change",
issn = "0040-1625",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing the relative importance of multiple channels for embodied and disembodied technological spillovers

AU - Krammer, Sorin M. S.

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - With ever increasing global integration, productivity improvements depend not only on in-house innovative efforts, but on those of international partners as well. This paper explores the impact of foreign R&D on productivity and technical efficiency of countries by considering three channels of embodied and disembodied spillovers, namely trade, foreign direct investment and patenting, and controlling for the direct licensing of foreign technologies. Furthermore, it contrasts these effects across 47 developed and transition countries between 1990 and 2009. Overall, I find that trade remains the dominant factor behind productivity and technical progress, while the effects of FDI- and patent-related spillovers are significantly smaller. The effect of foreign patenting is larger in developed nations while imports, inward FDI and foreign technology licensing are important sources of know-how for transition economies. The aggregate gains from spillovers appear larger for latter, confirming their significance in the process of development and catching-up. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - With ever increasing global integration, productivity improvements depend not only on in-house innovative efforts, but on those of international partners as well. This paper explores the impact of foreign R&D on productivity and technical efficiency of countries by considering three channels of embodied and disembodied spillovers, namely trade, foreign direct investment and patenting, and controlling for the direct licensing of foreign technologies. Furthermore, it contrasts these effects across 47 developed and transition countries between 1990 and 2009. Overall, I find that trade remains the dominant factor behind productivity and technical progress, while the effects of FDI- and patent-related spillovers are significantly smaller. The effect of foreign patenting is larger in developed nations while imports, inward FDI and foreign technology licensing are important sources of know-how for transition economies. The aggregate gains from spillovers appear larger for latter, confirming their significance in the process of development and catching-up. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - R&D spillovers

KW - Trade

KW - FDI

KW - Patents

KW - Licensing

KW - RESEARCH-AND-DEVELOPMENT

KW - FOREIGN DIRECT-INVESTMENT

KW - FINITE-SAMPLE PROPERTIES

KW - KNOWLEDGE SPILLOVERS

KW - ECONOMIC-GROWTH

KW - DOMESTIC FIRMS

KW - HETEROGENEOUS PANELS

KW - PRODUCTIVITY

KW - TRADE

KW - INNOVATION

U2 - 10.1016/j.techfore.2013.02.006

DO - 10.1016/j.techfore.2013.02.006

M3 - Article

VL - 81

SP - 272

EP - 286

JO - Technological Forecasting and Social Change

T2 - Technological Forecasting and Social Change

JF - Technological Forecasting and Social Change

SN - 0040-1625

ER -

ID: 15747228