Dataset

Data from: Simultaneous declines in summer survival of three shorebird species signals a flyway at risk

Piersma, T. (Creator), Lok, T. (Creator), Chen, Y. (Creator), Hassell, C. J. (Creator), Yang, N. (Creator), Boyle, A. N. (Creator), Slaymaker, M. (Creator), Chan, G. (Creator), University of Groningen, 8-Dec-2015

Dataset

  • Theunis Piersma (Creator)
  • Tamar Lok (Creator)
  • Ying Chen (Creator)
  • Chris J. Hassell (Creator)
  • Nicky Yang (Creator)
  • Adrian N. Boyle (Creator)
  • Matt Slaymaker (Creator)
  • Ginny Chan (Creator)

Description

The data package contains two datasets
- Individual encounter histories of bar-tailed godwits, great knots and red knots during 3 seasons.
The datafile contains the encounter histories of 821 bar-tailed godwits (Limosa lapponica menzbieri), 1064 great knots (Calidris tenuirostris) and 709 red knots (Calidris canutus, primarily of the subspecies piersmai) that were individually marked and resighted at their primary non-breeding area Roebuck Bay (North-West Australia) between December 2005 and June 2013. All birds were caught using cannon-netting, individually marked with 4 coloured bands and a flag and instantly released. Resightings occurred throughout the non-breeding season. To allow the estimation of survival during three seasons of the year, the captures and resightings were pooled into three periods: Jul-Oct, Nov-Feb, Mar-Jun. The median dates of resightings during these three periods, rounded to the 1st of the month, were 1 Oct, 1 Jan and 1 Apr, hence the intervals over which survival rates were estimated were approximately 3, 3 and 6 months. The encounter histories start with the period in which the individual was captured and individually marked. Each row in the datafile represents one individual, and the three columns represent the encounter history (ch), where individuals are either seen (1) or not seen (0) during a particular period, the age of the bird when it was first captured and individually marked (age_at_ringing), distinguishing first-year (1) and older (2) birds, and the species (species), where BTG=bar-tailed godwit, GK=great knot and RK=red knot.
- Individual encounter histories of red knots during 4 seasons
The datafile contains the encounter histories of 348 individually marked adult red knots (Calidris canutus, primarily of the subspecies piersmai) that were resighted at their primary non-breeding area Roebuck Bay and during spring stopover, in Bohai Bay (China) between May 2009 and April 2013. All birds were caught in Roebuck Bay using cannon-netting, individually marked with 4 coloured bands and a flag and instantly released. To estimate survival during four seasons, the resightings were pooled into four periods: Jul-Oct, Nov-Feb and Mar-Apr in Roebuck Bay and April-June in Bohai Bay (China). The median dates of resightings during these four periods, rounded to the 1st of the month, were 1 Oct, 1 Jan, 1 Apr and 15 May, hence the intervals over which survival rates were estimated were approximately 3, 3, 1.5 and 4.5 months. The encounter histories start with the first sighting of an individual at spring stopover in Bohai Bay. In subsequent resighting periods, the individual can either be seen (1) or not seen (0).
Date made available8-Dec-2015
PublisherUniversity of Groningen
Temporal coverage2005 - 2013
Date of data production2005 - 2013
Geographical coverageAsia, China, Australia, Siberia, Yellow Sea
Access to the dataset Open
Contact researchdata@rug.nl

    Keywords on Datasets

  • coastal conservation, Global change, intertidal land claims, migration, seasonal survival, Demography, extinction, bar-tailed godwit, great knot, red knot, population dynamics, mortality, Calidris canutus piersmai, Calidris tenuirostris, Limosa lapponica menzbieri, Holocene
Related Publications
  1. Simultaneous declines in summer survival of three shorebird species signals a flyway at risk

    Piersma, T., Lok, T., Chen, Y., Hassell, C. J., Yang, H., Boyle, A., Slaymaker, M., Chan, Y., Melville, D. S., Zhang, Z. & Ma, Z., 5-Feb-2016, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. 53, 2, p. 479-490

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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ID: 65142596