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ResearchGBBMicrobial Physiology & Host-Microbe InteractionsCremer group

Cremer group

Recent news

January 2019

PhD positions available

Want to join the group and dig into the exciting field of microbiota research? Currently there are two PhD positions available. Seeking for biologists, biochemists, physicists or mathematicians. Please see open-projects for more information.

January 2019

Starting the group

I just started in Groningen. Great team here at the MIM and the GBB. Excited to get going and to start collaborations with colleges at the GBB and the UMCG.

Welcome to the intestinal microbiology group

These are exciting times to study gut bacteria.  The microbes in our gut have a tremendous impact on our health and well-being: More and more studies are available showing how the composition of this microbiota is associated with human physiology and behavior. And we got a first glimpse into the mechanisms behind host-microbiota interactions. At the same time, astonishing progress in molecular and cellular biology, strongly driven by the recent advancement of molecular and omics techniques, have given us a for a first time a more comprehensive understanding how a single bacterial cell functions and grows. Building on this knowledge, we are studying the growth physiology of different gut bacteria. We try to understand how the growth behavior of different strains affects composition of the gut microbiota and couple into the interaction of the microbiota with the human host. We are doing this by combining a set of different tools, including state of the art anaerobic cultivation techniques to quantify bacterial growth and their interactions, in-vitro setups to emulate intestinal flow and its effect on growth, and simulation techniques to consider the specifics of human intestinal physiology when studying host-microbe interactions.

Last modified:04 February 2019 2.19 p.m.