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International Advisory Board

Prof Lori G. Beaman
Prof Lori G. Beaman

Prof Lori G. Beaman, is full Professor at the Department of Classics and Religion, University of Ottawa, Canada. After receiving her Bachelor in Philosophy at the University of Brunswick, she also obtained her MA, LLB, and PhD in Sociology at this University. In her program of research as Canada Research Chair, Beaman is exploring the ways in which Canadian society defines religion and how these definitions are translated into interpretations of religious freedom. In the process of this exploration she is taking a close look at the theoretical underpinnings of the limitation of religious freedom as it is currently viewed by Canada’s courts.

Prof Paul Bramadat
Prof Paul Bramadat

Prof Paul Bramadat is Director of the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society at the University of Victoria, Canada. Bramadat received his BA in religious studies from the University of Winnipeg (1990), his MA in religion and culture from McGill University (1993) and his PhD in religious studies from McMaster University (1998). In addition to directing the CSRS since 2008, Paul holds teaching appointments in the Department of History and the Religious Studies Program at the University of Victoria. He is interested in the intersections between secularism, religious radicalization, securitization, post-colonialism, and religious identity in contemporary Canada.

Prof Jonathan Fox
Prof Jonathan Fox

Prof Jonathan Fox is Associate Professor at the Department of Political Studies, Bar-Ilan University, in Ramat Gan, Israel. Fox (Ph.D. University of Maryland, 1997) specializes in the influence of religion on politics which he examines using both quantitative and qualitative methodology. Currently he is focusing on the issue of government religion policy across the world as part of the Religion and State project. His research also investigates the impact of religion on domestic conflict, terrorism, international intervention, and international relations. His other research interests include the quantitative analysis of Samuel Huntington's "Clash of Civilizations" theory, nationalism, and ethnic conflict.

Prof Jeffrey Haynes
Prof Jeffrey Haynes

Prof Jeffrey Haynes is Professor of International Relations and Director of the Centre for Religion, Conflict and Cooperation, London Metropolitan University, UK. Haynes is recognised as an international authority in five separate areas: religion and international relations; religion and politics; democracy and democratisation; development studies; and comparative politics and globalisation. He has written many books, journal articles and book chapters; they include a 17,000-word discussion paper for the Geneva-based United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, ‘Religion, Fundamentalism and Identity: A Global Perspective’ (1995) and a study for the Commonwealth Secretariat, ‘Political Transformation in the Commonwealth’ (2009).

Prof Mark Juergensmeyer
Prof Mark Juergensmeyer

Prof Mark Juergensmeyer, Director of the Orfalea Center for Global and International Studies, University of California Santa Barbara, USA. Next to being the Director of the Centre, Juergensmeyer is also a Professor of sociology, and affiliate professor of religious studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is an expert on religious violence, conflict resolution and South Asian religion and politics, and has published more than three hundred articles and twenty books, including Religion in Global Civil Society (2005) and Global Religions: An Introduction (2003). His widely-read Terror in the Mind of God: The Global Rise of Religious Violence (2003), is based on interviews with religious activists around the world.

Prof Cecelia Lynch
Prof Cecelia Lynch

Prof Cecelia Lynch is Professor of Political Science and Director of International Studies at the University of California Irvine, USA. Lynch works on religion and ethics in international affairs, social movements and civil society organizations, and interpretive/qualitative methods in social science research. Her articles address how we analyze religion in world politics, Islamic NGOs in Kenya, Christian diplomacy, the role of social movements and civil society actors on peace, globalization, humanitarianism, and religious/secular ethics, the relationship between contemporary theological constructs and international relations, constructivist ethics in international politics, substantive issues in qualitative and interpretive research methods, and the use of E.H. Carr and Immanuel Kant in international relations theory.

Prof Iver B. Neumann
Prof Iver B. Neumann

Prof Iver B. Neumann is Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics, UK. Previous positions include Director of Research at the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs, senior advisor in the Norwegian Ministries of Foreign Affairs and Defence, and five years as a full Professor in Russian Studies at Oslo University. Among his fourteen books are Russia and Europe: A study in Identity and International Relations, Uses of the Other: “The East” in European Identity Formation, Governing the Global Polity, and The Diffusion of Power in Global Governance.

Prof Paul Rasor
Prof Paul Rasor

Prof Paul Rasor is Director of the Center for the Study of Religious Freedom at the Virginia Wesleyan College, USA. He holds a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) and Ph.D. in the study of religion from Harvard, as well as a law degree (J.D.) from the University of Michigan. He is an ordained Unitarian Universalist minister. His academic career includes 9 years teaching theology and religious studies at a range of institutions, including Andover Newton Theological School, Harvard Divinity School, and Pendle Hill Quaker Study Center. He has published widely in both law and theology. His latest books are From Jamestown to Jefferson: The Evolution of Religious Freedom in Virginia (2011, co-edited), and Reclaiming Prophetic Witness: Liberal Religion in the Public Square (2012).

Prof Elizabeth Shakman Hurd
Prof Elizabeth Shakman Hurd

Elizabeth Shakman Hurd teaches and writes on religion and politics, the politics of human rights and the right to religious freedom, the legal governance of religious diversity, US foreign relations, and the international politics of the Middle East. Her work pursues an integrative approach to the study of politics and religion that offers insight into dilemmas of national and international governance involving difference, governance, power, law, and pluralism. Hurd is the author of The Politics of Secularism in International Relations (2008) and Beyond Religious Freedom: The New Global Politics of Religion (2015), both published by Princeton, and co-editor of Politics of Religious Freedom and Comparative Secularisms in a Global Age. She is co-PI, with Winnifred Sullivan, on a Luce-supported collaborative research project “Politics of Religion at Home and Abroad” (2016-2019) and co-organized the “Politics of Religious Freedom” project (2011-2014). At Northwestern, Hurd directs the Buffett Faculty Research Group on Global Politics & Religion, co-directs a graduate certificate program in Religion & Global Politics, is a core faculty member of the MENA Program, and teaches courses on America and the world, religion and international relations, the Middle East in global politics, and religion and law in cross-cultural perspective. Hurd is a regular contributor

Prof Peter (Jay) Smith
Prof Peter (Jay) Smith

Prof Peter (Jay) Smith is Professor of Political Science at the Athabasca University, Canada. Prof. Smith is particularly interested in the use of the Internet to mobilize people and social movements, secular and religious, from around the world in opposition to neoliberal corporate globalization. This work includes becoming part of an international group of scholars studying the World Social Forum, and similar regional, national, and local forums which represent meetings of those in civil society wishing to find democratic alternatives to the present global order. His recent publications include "The Impact of Globalization on Citizenship: Decline or Renaissance?” and Global Democracy and the World Social Forums Boulder.

Prof Manfred Steger
Prof Manfred Steger

Prof Manfred Steger is Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawaii Manoa, USA and Professor of Global Studies, RMIT University, Australia. His main research interests include global politics, global studies, and political theory and revolve around globalization, political ideologies, comparative political theory, and critical discourse analysis. Prof. Steger has authored or edited 20+ books, including: The Rise of the Global Imaginary: Political Ideologies from the French Revolution to the Global War on Terror, the award-winning Globalisms: The Great Ideological Struggle of the 21st Century, and the bestselling Globalization: A Very Short Introduction. His most recent book, Justice Globalism: Ideology, Crises, Policy (2013) is a study of the political ideology and policy proposals of the global justice movement.

Prof Monika Wohlrab-Sahr
Prof Monika Wohlrab-Sahr

Prof Monika Wohlrab-Sahr, Institute for Cultural Studies, University of Leipzig, Germany. Wohlrab-Sahr a professor of cultural sociology with an interest in secularization, Islam in Western Societies, and qualitative methodology. Her publications include the articles “Secularization as Conflict,” “The Stable Third: Non-religiosity in Germany,” and “Contested Secularities: Religious Minorities and Secular Progressivism in the Netherlands.” One of her recent publications (2012) is titled “Multiple Secularities: Toward a Cultural Sociology of Secular-Religious Distinctions” and presents a conceptual framework of ‘multiple secularities’ with a view to refocusing sociological research on religion and secularity.

Prof Dvora Yanow
Prof Dvora Yanow

Prof Dvora Yanow is Visiting Professor, Communication, Philosophy and Technology Department at Wageningen University, the Netherlands. Her interests includethe communication of meaning in organizational and policy settings.  Present research includes comparative immigrant and integration policies, Dutch race-ethnic category-making, reflective practice and practice studies, science museums and the idea of 'science,' and US Institutional Review Board and other research regulatory policies and practices. She recently published Constructing "race” and “ethnicity" in America:  Category-making in public policy and administration and “ People out of Place: Allochthony and autochthony in Netherlands identity discourse – metaphors and categories in action.”

Prof Roland Bleiker
Prof Roland Bleiker

Prof Roland Bleiker is Professor of International Relations at the School of Political Science and International Studies, University of Queensland, Australia. Roland Bleiker grew up in Zürich, Switzerland, where he was educated and worked as a lawyer. He then studied international relations in Paris, Toronto, Vancouver and Canberra, where he obtained his Ph.D. from the Australian National University. Bleiker also worked for two years in a Swiss diplomatic mission in Panmunjom, the Korean DMZ. Bleiker’s passion lies with rethinking key dilemmas in world politics through inter-disciplinary and cross-cultural sources. Together with colleagues at UQ and elsewhere he is currently conducting joint-research on visual politics.

Prof Rosi Braidotti
Prof Rosi Braidotti

Prof Rosi Braidotti is a Philosopher and Distinguished University Professor at Utrecht University as well as director of the Centre for the Humanities in Utrecht. Braidotti’s publications have consistently been placed in continental philosophy, at the intersection with social and political theory, cultural politics, gender, feminist theory and ethnicity studies. Braidotti makes a case for an alternative view on subjectivity, ethics and emancipation and pitches diversity against the postmodernist risk of cultural relativism while also standing against the tenets of liberal individualism. Throughout her work, Braidotti asserts and demonstrates the importance of combining theoretical concerns with a serious commitment to producing socially and politically relevant scholarship that contributes to making a difference in the world.

Last modified:17 July 2019 2.51 p.m.