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Molecular Machines Nobel Prize Conference Groningen 19-22 November 2017

Molecular Machines Nobel Prize ConferenceConference

Invited speakers

Takuzo Aida

Takuzo Aida
Takuzo Aida

Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan.
Prof. Aida reveived his education at Yokohama National University (BS, 1979), The University of Tokyo (MS 1981 and PhD 1984).

Professional Appointments: 1984-1989: Assistant Professor, The University of Tokyo (UT); 1989-1991: Lecturer, UT; 1991-1996: Associate Professor, UT; 1996-Now: Professor, UT; 1996-1999: Researcher, Japan Science & Technology Agency, PRESTO Project; 2000-2005: Director, Japan Science & Technology Agency, ERATO Nanospace Project; 2005-2010: Director, Japan Science & Technology Agency, EARTO-SORST Project on Electronic Nanospace; 2008-2012: Director, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute; 2013-2013: Deputy Director, Riken Center for Emergent Matter Science; 2004-2006: Associate Editor, Journal of Materials Chemistry (RSC); 2009-Present: Board of Reviewing Editors, Science Magazine (AAAS); 2014-Present: Advisory Board, Journal of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
Recent Awards: American Chemical Society Award in Polymer Chemistry (2009) / Chemical Society of Japan Award (2009) / Purple Ribbon (2010) / Alexander von Humboldt Research Award (2011) / Fujiwara Prize (2011) / Arthur K. Doolittle Award (2013) / Van?t Hoff Award Lecture (2013) / Leo Esaki Prize (2015) / Dean Award, U. Tokyo (2016) / Chirality Medal (2017)

Harry Anderson

Harry Anderson
Harry Anderson

Molecular Wires and Nanorings — Towards Molecular Electronic Circuits
"Recent results on charge transport in pi-conjugated porphyrin-based molecular wires and nanorings will be presented. This work explores whether aromatic ring currents can flow in large macrocycles, and whether the construction of molecular electronic circuits can be used to engineer unusual properties. Advances in template-directed synthesis provide access to molecules with which to investigate these questions. For example, we have recently demonstrated that the nanoring shown below, with a diameter of 2.5 nm, sustains a global aromatic ring current in its 6+ oxidation state."

Alberto Credi

Alberto Credi
Alberto Credi

Rotaxane-based molecular machines: from switching to ratcheting
"The bottom-up design, preparation and characterization of molecular scale machines and motors have formidably stimulated the ingenuity and creativity of chemists in the past three decades [1,2]. The interest on this kind of systems arises from their ability to perform a (useful) function in response to chemical and/or physical signals. In this context, the use of light stimulation has several advantages, primarily because photons can be used to supply energy to the system (i.e., write) as well as to gain information about its state (i.e., read). Mechanically interlocked molecules exhibit interesting structural and functional properties for the construction of molecular devices. Indeed, molecular shuttles based on rotaxanes constitute common examples of nanoscale machines.

Here we will describe investigations undertaken in our laboratories and aimed at exploiting the nanoscale movements in rotaxane shuttles to perform functions such as the interaction between remote sites and the transport of a cargo [3]. From a fundamental viewpoint these systems behave as molecular switches under thermodynamic control. In appropriately designed architectures, however, kinetics can play a major role in governing intercomponent movements. By implementing energy and/or information ratcheting effects, directional and autonomous movement of the molecular components can occur [4]. We have combined such a strategy with a minimalist chemical design to realize artificial nanoscale pumps powered by light [5]."

Makoto Fujita

Makoto Fujita
Makoto Fujita

Makoto Fujita is Professor of Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Japan. He received his Ph. D. degree from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1987. After working in Chiba University (as assistant prof., lecture, and associate prof.) and Institute for Molecular Science (IMS) at Okazaki (as associate prof.), in 1999, he was appointed as a full professor of Nagoya University. In 2002, he moved to the current position. His research interests include: Coordination Self-Assembly; Construction of nano-scale discrete frameworks; Molecular Confinement Effects; the Crystalline Sponge Method.
About 330 publications between 1980 and 2017; more than 500 lectures and seminars at international or Japanese meetings, in universities or in industrial or governmental research centers. According to ISI Web of Knowledge, Makoto Fujita is among the 'Most-Cited Scientists in Chemistry’ (around 30,000 citations). His h-index is equal to 90. Selected Awards he has received are: Naito Foundation Merit Award, 2017; John Osborn Lecturer, 2015; Medal with Purple Ribbon, 2014; Fred Basolo Medal , 2014; Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, 2013; The Chemical Society of Japan (CSJ) Award, 2013; Thomson Reuters Research Front Award, 2012; Reona Ezaki Award, 2010; Japan Society of Coordination Chemistry (JSCC) Award, 2010; The Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Research Category, 2009; Honorary Professor of Renmin University of China (Department of Chemistry); International Izatt-Christensen Award in Macrocyclic Chemistry, 2004: Silver Medal of Nagoya Medal Seminar, 2003; Japan IBM Award, 2001; Gold Medal of Tokyo Techno Forum 21, 2001; The Divisional Award of the Chemical Society of Japan, 2000; Progress Award in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Japan; 1994.

Nicolas Giuseppone

Nicolas Giuseppone
Nicolas Giuseppone

Out-of-equilibrium Integration of Molecular Machines

Making molecular machines that can be useful in the macroscopic world is a challenging long-term goal of nanoscience. Inspired by the protein machinery found in biological systems, and based on the theoretical understanding of the physics of motion at the nanoscale, organic chemists have developed a number of molecules that can produce work when triggered by various external chemical or physical stimuli. In particular, basic molecular switches that commute between at least two thermodynamic minima and more advanced molecular motors that behave as dissipative units working far from equilibrium when fueled with external energy have been reported. However, the coordination of individual molecular motors in a continuous mechanical process that can have a measurable effect at the macroscale has remained elusive until very recently. We will discuss advances developed by our group on artificial molecular machines and involving their mechanical coupling within dynamic polymeric systems. We will show that it is now possible to amplify their individual motions to achieve macroscopic functions in materials. In particular, we will present a dual-light controlled system operating fully out-of-equilibrium, and in which the integrated motions of two types of mechanically active units can be tuned by modulation of frequencies.

David Leigh

Dave Leigh
Dave Leigh

David obtained his PhD from the University of Sheffield, UK, in 1987 and, after postdoctoral research at the National Research Council of Canada in Ottawa, David returned to the UK as a Lecturer at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology in 1989. After spells at the Universities of Warwick and Edinburgh, in 2012 David returned to Manchester where he is currently the Sir Samuel Hall Chair of Chemistry and a Royal Society Research Professor.

Josef Michl

Josef Michl
Josef Michl

Search for collective behavior of dipolar molecular rotors
"Recent efforts to prepare highly organized thin layers and monomolecular layers of artificial dipolar molecular rotors that exhibit collective behavior will be described. The rotor arrays form a trigonal lattice and are either assembled as guests in the channels of a host crystal (surface and bulk inclusion in compounds) or self-assembled on a suitable surface. The techniques used for their study are various kinds of spectroscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and dielectric measurements."

He Tian

He Tian
He Tian

Photo-switchable & responsive Supramolecular Systems
Supramolecular self-assembly has become an efficient strategy in constructing well-ordered nanostructures using a bottom-up way in material science and has also shown its great potential in biological applications. Photo-switchable & responsive compounds are core organic molecules which can undergo reversible photochemical reactions between two chemical species with distinct properties. They have been incorporated into various materials for applications including optical devices, data recording and storage, smart polymers, and so forth. Introducing these photo-switchable & responsive core units into supramolecular self-assembling systems endows the supramolecular nanostructures or materials with intriguing responsive behavior to light, which can be conveniently orthogonal to other stimuli. From another perspective, the well-ordered supramolecular structures or materials with complexity and stimuli-responsive properties have the capability to “amplify” the light-controlled conformation changes, thus producing more sophisticated functions. This lecture mainly highlights the recent advances achieved in our laboratory in fabricating artificial supramolecular self-assembling systems with photochromic compounds as light-responsive units.

Vivian Yam

Vivian Yam
Vivian Yam

From Discrete Molecular Motifs to Supramolecular Assembly, Nanostructures and Photofunctions
"Recent works in our laboratory have shown that novel classes of photofunctional molecular materials could be assembled through the use of various chromophoric building blocks. In this presentation, various design and synthetic strategies together with the successful isolation of new classes of photofunctional complexes of selected metals and molecules will be described. A number of these compounds have been shown to display rich optical, luminescence and photofunctional behavior. Correlations of the chromophoric, luminescence and photofunctional behavior with the electronic and structural effects of the compounds have been made. Some of these compounds have also been found to undergo supramolecular assembly to give a variety of nanostructures and morphologies with interesting optical properties. By understanding the spectroscopic origin and the structure-property relationships, the characteristics of these compounds could be fine-tuned for specific applications and functions through rational design and assembly strategies. These photofunctional molecular materials may find potential applications as soft materials and hybrids with responsive conformational changes and as photoresponsive molecular switches and memories.''

Laatst gewijzigd:30 oktober 2017 11:21