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EducationMaster's and PhD degree programmesSociologySocial Networks in a Sustainable Society
Header image Social Networks in a Sustainable Society

Social Networks in a Sustainable Society

How do social networks hold together or keep apart families and communities, or boost creativity in firms? And how do personal ties influence your health, career, or your choice of a partner?

Everyone is connected. If you want to know more about how visible and hidden social networks often make the difference, our master track will equip you with the analytical, methodological, and policy making tools to:

  • detect and properly describe hidden social network structures and processes,
  • explain the origins, dynamics, and impact of networks in a wide range of policy domains,
  • assess how informal networks interact with formal policies,
  • design network interventions and evaluate their effectiveness.

Drawing on a unique combination of skills, this master track bridges the applied field of policy design with the latest insights of network science. You will learn to apply social network theories to a wide range of societal problems; you will use cutting-edge tools and methods to analyse quantitative and qualitative network data; and you will apply this knowledge with the aim of developing policies for sustainable cooperation.

Facts & Figures
Degree
MSc in Sociology
Course type
Master
Duration
12 months (60 ECTS)
Croho code
66601
Language of instruction
English
Start
September
Faculty
Behavioural and Social Sciences
Why study this programme in Groningen?
  • combining training in social network research with sociological analysis of policy and policy applications
  • world-leading in the development and application of cutting-edge methods for social network analysis
  • hands-on traineeships in applied social network research
Programme

This master aims at training “generalist policy makers” who are able to work across policy domains and organizational levels thanks to their analytical, methodological and implementation skills.

In this program network methodology is translated into an integrated set of conceptual tools and practical skills needed to analyze and interpret network data from different contexts. This set of flexible competences is especially valuable when dealing with the complexity of societies, where the multiplicity of actors, organizations, networks and policies requires a broad and generalist perspective. Such a focus on networks is complemented by a strong attention to policy and interventions, in order to satisfy the needs of domestic and international employers.

This track offers an inspiring training program with a mix of theoretical and methodological courses especially designed for this track (Theories of networks and sustainable cooperation and Social Network Analysis), adopted from the general Sociology Master (Research Forum and Pro-social Behaviour), and re-designed in order to combine a generalist training on policy design and evaluation with more specific network applications (Policy design with network applications and Policy evaluation with network applications)

Periods
CoursesCourse Catalog >1234
Policy design with network applications (5 EC)
Social Network Analysis (5 EC)
Theories of networks and sustainable cooperation (5 EC)
Policy Evaluation with network applications (5 EC)
Prosocial Behaviour (5 EC)
Research Forum for thesis preparation (5 EC)
Internship (10 EC)
Master thesis (20 EC) (20 EC)

Study abroad

  • Study abroad is optional
Entry Requirements

Admission requirements

Specific requirementsMore information
knowledge minimum

The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of research design, and various quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection, preferably questionnaire design and text analysis, and be able to apply these methods in empirical research. The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of statistics, including sampling, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, multiple regression and analysis of variance, and logistic regression, and must be able to apply these methods and models in empirical research. If the applicant is not able to demonstrate sufficient knowledge, the admissions committee may require the applicant to take a test.

If you have any deficiencies in connection with Statistics and Research Methodology then we offer the possibility to take pre-master courses. The Admissions Office will inform you if you would qualify for this. For more information have a look at the SPO site about this premaster: http://spo-groningen.nl/premaster-statistics-and-research-methodology/

language test

The official language of the programme is English. Non-native English speakers must provide evidence of satisfactory results for one of the following standard tests: TOEFL: ≥ 580 paper-based test, ≥ 237 computer-based test; ≥ 93 internet-based; IELTS (Academic): ≥ Band 6.5. Official test results must be supplied. Please note, we do not accept Institutional TOEFL results as evidence of English proficiency.

previous education

University BA- of BSc in Sociology or in one of the other Social Sciences, majoring Sociology.. Good knowledge of research methodology and basic statistics.

Admission for students from other universities depends on the courses they followed in their bachelor degree programme.

To eliminate deficiencies regarding Statistics and Research Methodology, students can participate in the BSS web-supported premaster. The deficiencies are diagnosed by the admission committee of Sociology of the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences (BSS) of the University of Groningen. For more information visit the following site: http://www.rug.nl/gmw/education/bridging-programmes/pre-master-bss/

written request

Write (type) a letter (no larger than one A4 sheet) explaining your motivation to follow this programme. You should consider at least the following topics:

  • Your motivation to study education at a Master's level;
  • Relevant study and/or work experience;
  • Areas of particular interest in Sociology;
  • Career perspectives and in what way completing this Master's programme would contribute to accomplish them.

Registration procedure

To apply for this programme, first go to Studielink. After you have submitted your details in Studielink, you will receive an e-mail with the information necessary to activate your user account for OAS (the Online Application System).
See the application procedure for some guidance in OAS

Then, please upload the following documents in OAS:

*a certified copy of the (Bachelor) diploma on the basis of which you ask admission to our programme (both original language and translated in English)
*a certified copy of your transcript of records (both original language and translated in English)
*a certified copy of your results for one of the mentioned English tests (exc. for native speakers)
*a copy of your passport or ID card
*a letter of motivation

If you have any doubts about your application, please contact us at: admission@rug.nl

Transfer options

Study programmeOrganizationTransition
All Research universities

Via a pre-master with a maximum of 60 EC

Additional requirements:
  • knowledge minimum
  • additional subject
More information:

Deficiency program: admission for students from other universities depends on the courses they followed in their bachelor degree programme.

SociologyAll Research universities

No additional requirements

More information:

Direct access for students who have finished the Dutch bachelor programme in Sociology at the University of Groningen or other Dutch research universities and for students who finished the Dutch pre-master programme Sociology at the University of Groningen

Study programmeOrganizationTransition
SociologyUniversity of Groningen

No additional requirements

More information:

Direct access for students who have finished the Dutch bachelor programme in Sociology at the University of Groningen.

Admission requirements

Specific requirementsMore information
knowledge minimum

The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of research design, and various quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection, preferably questionnaire design and text analysis, and be able to apply these methods in empirical research. The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of statistics, including sampling, descriptive statistics, hypothesis testing, multiple regression and analysis of variance, and logistic regression, and must be able to apply these methods and models in empirical research. If the applicant is not able to demonstrate sufficient knowledge, the admissions committee may require the applicant to take a test.

If you have any deficiencies in connection with Statistics and Research Methodology then we offer the possibility to take pre-master courses. The Admissions Office will inform you if you would qualify for this. For more information have a look at the SPO site about this premaster: http://spo-groningen.nl/premaster-statistics-and-research-methodology/

language test

The official language of the programme is English. Non-native English speakers must provide evidence of satisfactory results for one of the following standard tests: TOEFL: ≥ 580 paper-based test, ≥ 237 computer-based test; ≥ 92 internet-based; IELTS (Academic): ≥ Band 6.5. Official test results must be supplied. Please note, we do not accept Institutional TOEFL results as evidence of English proficiency.

previous education

University BA- of BSc in Sociology or in one of the other Social Sciences, majoring Sociology. Good knowledge of research methodology and basic statistics.

Admission for students from other universities depends on the courses they followed in their bachelor degree programme.

To eliminate deficiencies regarding Statistics and Research Methodology, students can participate in the BSS web-supported premaster. The deficiencies are diagnosed by the admission committee of Sociology of the Faculty of Behavioural and Social Sciences (BSS) of the University of Groningen. For more information visit the following site: http://www.rug.nl/gmw/education/bridging-programmes/pre-master-bss/

written request

Write (type) a letter (no larger than one A4 sheet) explaining your motivation to follow this programme. You should consider at least the following topics:

  • Your motivation to study education at a Master's level;
  • Relevant study and/or work experience;
  • Areas of particular interest in Sociology;
  • Career perspectives and in what way completing this Master's programme would contribute to accomplish them.

Language requirements

ExamMinimum score
C1 Advanced (formerly CAE)A1
C2 Proficiency (formerly CPE)A1
IELTS overall band6.5
TOEFL paper based580
TOEFL computer based237
TOEFL internet based92

Registration procedure

To apply for this programme, first go to Studielink. After you have submitted your details in Studielink, you will receive an e-mail with the information necessary to activate your user account for OAS (the Online Application System).
See the application procedure for some guidance in OAS

Then, please upload the following documents in OAS:
* a certified copy of the (Bachelor) diploma on the basis of which you ask admission to our programme (both original language and translated in English)
* a certified copy of your transcript of records (both original language and translated in English)
* a certified copy of your results for one of the mentioned English tests (exc. for native speakers)
* a copy of your passport or ID card
* a letter of motivation
* two references
If you have any doubts about your application, please contact us at: bss.msc.admission@rug.nl.

Write (type) a letter (no larger than one A4 sheet) explaining your motivation to follow this programme. You should consider at least the following topics:

Your motivation to study education at a Master's level;
Relevant study and/or work experience;
Areas of particular interest in Sociology;
Career perspectives and in what way completing this Master's programme would contribute to accomplish them.

Application deadlines

Type of studentDeadlineStart course
Dutch students01 May 201901 September 2019
01 May 202001 September 2020
EU/EEA students01 May 201901 September 2019
01 May 202001 September 2020
non-EU/EEA students01 May 201901 September 2019
01 May 202001 September 2020
Tuition Fees
NationalityYearFeeProgramme form
EU/EEA2018-2019€ 2060full-time
non-EU/EEA2018-2019€ 14350full-time
EU/EEA2019-2020€ 2083full-time
non-EU/EEA2019-2020€ 14600full-time

Practical information for:

After your studies

Job prospects

By applying social network theory and methods in their internships our students addressed issues as diverse as

* help seeking behavior in addicts,
* design and implementation of crime fighting initiatives,
* relationships between teachers in high schools
* performance and satisfaction in learning networks

Job examples

  • Government advisors

    advisors of science policy for governmental organizations

  • Academics

    researchers or teachers in departments of social sciences, philosophy or medicine

  • Science communicators

    freelance, or for editorial offices of a magazine, university or publisher

  • Qualitative researchers

    for research agencies, or governmental organizations

Research

Research in Sociology: Five research lines, five themes

Research at the Department of Sociology in Groningen is well known for its focus on

Research findings and insights about societal questions often find their way back to society, e.g. in policy research. Read more about Sociology and society .

A research line comprises a number of related projects in which experts in the corresponding fields collaborate and meet regularly. In these lab meetings, research staff, postdocs, PhD students, or research master students discuss ongoing work, papers or research proposals in progress, but also literature of common interest.These themes link to topics of high societal interest and much of the research conducted in the research lines applies sociological knowledge to current societal problems.

Research activities of the department of Sociology are concentrated in five research lines:

  • Norms and Networks, Institutions;
    Understanding the classical sociological phenomena of social integration and segregation is key, in particular in culturally diverse societies, such as the Netherlands.
    In this research the conditions are studied under which cultural, demographic, and political differences can be overcome and collaboration and cooperation becomes possible.

  • Organizations, and Sustainable Cooperation
    Which institutional arrangements bring about and sustain cooperative relationships that create added value for individuals, organizations, and societies?
    In four interrelated research themes researchers attempt to answer that question.

  • Social development of young people
    In the lives of young people there are a lot of changes. "Young people are really looking for themselves. Who am I? What do I want? Where do I belong?"
    Childhood experiences can have a lasting influence. For example, children who are bullied early in life are more likely later on to suffer from depression.
    Therefore it is important according Veenstra to examine the social development of young people. His research focuses on positive outcomes, goals, friendships and romantic relationships, and negative outcomes, problem behaviour and bullying.

  • Healthy and happy ageing
    The ageing of the population is often being considered as a problem and as a cost for society. But it may actually be more important to examine how people can age in a healthy and happy way, and under which circumstances health and well-being can be maintained for as long as possible during the lifespan. The research group aims at contributing to this challenge with her research program on health and well-being over the lifespan.

  • Statistical methods for the analysis of social network data.
    Do high school students make their friends start smoking? Is a bully a central actor in the classroom? Is the ‘old boy network’ of chief executive officers just a myth, or can social network analysis help to prove its existence through interlocking directorates? ‘It is our job to develop statistical methods, models and software necessary for sociological research,’ The research group is a small group of researchers of statistical methods for social network analysis, statisticians and mathematicians.


Apply nowDownload brochureOpen days and eventsContact
Master's dayBroerstraat 5More information
Webinar: Master Social Networks in a Sustainable SocietyMore information

Contact

If you want to know more about the programme Social Networks in a Sustainable Society, please contact:

  • Watch this videoClose
  • 
								Testimonial of  student Merlijn de Lange

    It is about solving social problems through the analysis of social networks.

    – student Merlijn de Lange
    Read more

    I came across this programme by accident. I went to an information session for prospective Master's students and was considering either a Research Master's or the Dutch-taught Crime and Security Master's programme. The presentation for Social Networks in a Sustainable Society was scheduled between those two, so I stayed and listened while I was waiting. It sounded so much more interesting than what I originally had in mind that I chose it.

    I'm very satisfied with my choice. I really enjoy the programme. The lecturers developed it from scratch, and it shows: they are incredibly enthusiastic. As we are a small group of students, there is plenty of opportunity for personal contact with our lecturers.

    We do less statistics than I had expected – our main focus is the theory of social network analysis. But that's very interesting as well. It's about solving societal problems by analysing social networks.

    For instance, one of the cases we studied was about HIV prevention in the homeless. A prevention method did exist, but it was expensive and didn't work very well. By examining the structure of homeless people's social networks and how these could be used to prevent HIV infection, the researchers were able to develop a much cheaper and more effective method.

    I'm currently doing a placement at the Court of Audit, which I'm thrilled with, because it gives me the opportunity to do research that really means something. The project I'm working on is about education for children with special needs. I'm investigating how schools work together with various organizations in order to provide this.

    This Master's programme could land you anywhere. My classmates have done placements at the Institute for Social Research in Friesland, with the police and at the Northern Netherlands Centre for Drug Rehabilitation. Social network analysis is a relatively new discipline and the demand for specialists in the field is high. That means this programme offers good career prospects. But most importantly, it's a really interesting programme to follow.


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  • 
								Testimonial of student Aurora Krogh

    I am convinced that this Master's programme will help me make a difference in society.

    – student Aurora Krogh
    Read more

    My name is Aurora Krogh. I'm Norwegian, and I am a Master's student in the Social Networks in a Sustainable Society track. I did my Bachelor's at the University of Oslo and came to Groningen two years ago as an exchange student in Sociology. Back then, I chose Groningen because the level of the subjects taught appealed to me and because Groningen as a city has so much to offer.

    During my stay here I found out about the Master’s track in Social Networks. I decided that I wasn’t done yet in Groningen! I was delighted to meet Professor Rafael Wittek, who explained the structure of the programme and convinced me of the relevance of the field.

    What I love about this Master’s track in Groningen is the unique focus on social networks. It does not exist anywhere else! The social network approach provides a method for analyzing and solving societal problems. We study problems from real life and apply our knowledge of social networks to create successful interventions. The social networks theory enables me to take into account the context people live in.

    In the course units, I can work on topics which interest me most, namely integration and cross-cultural communication. I have the opportunity to focus on these themes in the assignments and discussions in class. The choice of where to do my placement is also up to me, and the programme provides support for finding a suitable placement position. I hope to find a placement where I can work on integration issues, for example with an NGO such as Amnesty International or at a refugee centre. These would also be great places to work once I have graduated.

    Learning about integration is not something I do only in class. Being in an international environment has been very educational, too. The intercultural environment has made me more reflective. For example, as a Norwegian I am used to a careful and hinting communication style. Living here for a while, I encountered the Dutch directness. This was a bit shocking at first, but now I value it as a way of being honest and transparent.

    Future students should be aware that this is a challenging programme! But it is well worth the effort. I am convinced that this Master’s programme will help me make a difference in society.


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  • 
								Testimonial of

    lecturer Francesca Giardini – Assistant professor in Sociology

    Read more

    I started teaching at the UG a year and a half ago. Before that, I was working in Italy – my home country – at the CNR, the National Research Council of Italy, which is the largest public research institution in Italy. There were no teaching opportunities in Italy, and when I realized I really liked teaching I started looking for a new challenge in a different country. I came across the opportunity of working at the UG and went for it! Best choice ever!

    I am one of the lecturers in the Sociology English Master’s track ‘Social Networks in a Sustainable Society’. The main goal of this track is to teach students how to apply social network theories and methods to solving collective and societal problems. We make students look at social realities and problems by showing them how to put on ‘network glasses’. Networks are usually very important and they can be found all around us: we have networks of friends and colleagues, we are part of clubs, associations and communities. In this track we focus on the effects of these relationships, and students learn to evaluate when a relational approach is useful and how it can be used to provide individuals, groups and organizations with incentives for sustainable cooperation. However, in this track we are not only concerned with organization networks but also with personal networks and their effects on individuals’ wellbeing, job satisfaction or even healthy behaviour.

    This Master’s track fits within the broader range of sociology in multiple ways. First, as sociologists we are interested in explaining why some families, groups, communities or organizations are successful in creating and maintaining high levels of collaboration whereas others fail, and we believe that social networks can offer interesting explanations about this link between the individual (micro) and the societal (macro) levels. Social network theories and methods are contributing a lot to research and teaching in Sociology, offering insights into the way in which a specific set of relationships may affect individual behaviours, but also how these structures are the result of personal choices and actions. Second, this is a very theory-oriented Master’s and we build on several classical sociological theories, in combination with more network-specialized course units. Last but not least, this programme is very focused on the policy implications of network studies, offering a unique combination between policy and relational approaches.

    Future students can expect to be trained as general policymakers. This is quite special because in the Dutch-taught track, for instance, students have to choose between different trajectories from the start. In our track this is not necessary because students learn methods and theories which can be applied in all kinds of sectors, from criminality and antisocial behaviour to healthy ageing. Students will acquire a general understanding of how relationships can promote sustainable cooperation in a society, and they can choose a more specialized path for their internship and for their thesis.

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  • 
								Testimonial of student Vera Buis

    I am personally very interested in criminology, and I often used this topic in my essays.

    – student Vera Buis
    Read more

    My name is Vera Buijs and I completed the Master's track in Social Networks in a Sustainable Society last year. Before that, I did a Bachelor's in Sociology, also at the UG. During my Bachelor's I followed a course unit on Social Network Analysis, so I already had an idea of what the programme would be like.

    Right now I am working on my PhD, which was actually not part of my initial plan. I always wanted to make a practical contribution to society. That sounds idealistic, and that's what it was. I wanted to directly apply research results to actual practice. I had a strong feeling that, when you follow a PhD programme, you are working with new knowledge on a very abstract level, rather than applying existing knowledge. But when I graduated, I realized that I wasn't nearly done studying yet and that there was so much more that I wanted to know more about. It became clear to me that you can still contribute to society when you are working on your PhD. And with a degree like Sociology in particular you are most definitely working in a societal context – sociology is inextricably linked with things that happen in society.

    The project that I am working on during my PhD focuses on social networks and social well-being. Why and how do people around us make us feel better? What makes for a pleasant interaction? I can combine my theoretical knowledge from the bachelor with the network related insights from the master, together with my interest in mathematics (how should we measure this?). Furthermore, as I applied for an interdisciplinary PhD track, I am also part of the psychology department, which makes my research focus shift more to the individual as well.

    I was one of the first cohort of students who started this Master’s track two years ago. We were a small group of just five people, so we quickly got to know each other. We were able to contact each other quickly when necessary, as well as the lecturers. The content of the Master's track was clearly explained during the first introductory meeting, and luckily this matched my expectations. We all found it very exciting to choose this track, but we already knew the lecturers so we had faith in the quality of the programme.

    Many people think that this track only focuses on online networks like Facebook. But that's not true. Every person and every organization is part of a network. Family, friends, partners or other stakeholders are always present. This programme is mainly about understanding how networks influence society and how they can be applied. And don't worry, you won't have to learn all the maths behind the methods straight away, and it's not all about statistics either!

    What I also liked about this programme was the freedom to choose our own topics. I am personally very interested in criminology, and I often used this topic in my essays. We were also free to choose our own preferred methods of analysing things. Do you prefer to analyse at an individual or organizational level? In a criminal network or elsewhere? Students can adapt this programme to their personal preferences.

    The track is entirely English-taught, and I thought it would be a good idea to immerse myself in the language. I wanted to improve my English, so I decided to write my Bachelor's thesis in English. This has several advantages. For example, you get better acquainted with literature in English, and you also prepare for experiences abroad.

    Vera Buijs, 23 – MA in Social Networks in a Sustainable Society

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  • 
								Testimonial of student Teun Koning

    The Master's in Social Networks is a small-scale programme with an international outlook, and students discuss and collaborate a lot during class

    – student Teun Koning
    Read more

    My name is Teun Koning. I am 25 and originally from Alkmaar. I started my degree programme in Mathematics in 2010, but the abstract nature of the degree programme did not appeal to me. In 2011 I switched to Sociology, and this academic year I am in the Master's in Social Networks in a Sustainable Society.

    What struck me from the start of the Bachelor’s programme in Sociology was the enjoyable atmosphere there. Not only my fellow students but also the lecturers and other staff are all friendly people. This is perhaps even more so in the Master’s programme. The lecturers always find time to listen if something is troubling you.

    During both programmes I mainly learned to approach a topic from an academic perspective – by critically reading and analyzing articles – and how to present arguments in an academic way, in writing as well as verbally. I’m planning to do the post-Master’s programme in teacher training for upper secondary education (LVHO) next year. After that, I would like to work as a teacher, at least part-time, and combine this with a job that dovetails with the topic of my Master’s.

    To those who are still undecided on studying at the UG, I would like to say: read up on the content of your programme in advance as well as you can. The Bachelor’s in Sociology in Groningen is very different from the one in Amsterdam for example. It’s equally important to find out whether the particular characteristics of the degree programme suit you; the Master’s in Social Networks is a small-scale programme with an international outlook, and students discuss and collaborate a lot during class.


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Study associations

Sociëtas

Societas is the sociological study association at the University of Groningen. It has over 300 members.
Societas organizes various activities for all sociology students, such as lectures, excursions, a trip abroad, the introduction weekend, a lift contest, participation in the Batavierenrace, drinks and the Night of Sociology. The association also organizes a book sale for sociology students.
https://www.societasonline.nl/
Read more
Student profile

You

  • are interested in understanding how relationships shape individuals' choices and actions
  • want to learn social network theories and methodology
  • have affinity with societal issues, like work-family balance, access to education, decentralization and privatization, migration and political polarization, etc.
  • have an interest in policy making tools and processes
  • want to acquire analytical and methodological skills to better understand how the content, structure and dynamics of social networks affect society across a wide range of domains.