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Education Master's and PhD degree programmes Legal Public Administration Governance and Law in Digital Society
Header image Governance and Law in Digital Society

Governance and Law in Digital Society

How do governments influence effects of digitalisation, such as cybercrime and breaches of privacy? And how can governments make better use of benefits that digitalisation has to offer?

In the modern globalised world, privacy and security are two topics that do not lose their relevance. On the contrary, incidents demonstrate how they affect our daily life. This LLM programme discusses the need to protect the privacy of citizens online, the influence of the private sector and the effectiveness of law enforcement.

Our students have a variety of backgrounds. What they have in common is that they are interested in studying how governments deal with challenges of digitalisation. They use their background knowledge of the legal frameworks and governance structures in order to develop this interest.

Consequently, if you are a law student, in addition to your degree, you will need an understanding of governance theories and social research methods before you commence with the degree. If you do not have prior knowledge in this area, you can acquire it by following our online, premaster programme offered between February and May. A successful completion of this programme provides you with proven knowledge of these domains, making you eligible for this Master’s degree.

If you have a social science background, it might be necessary to develop a greater understanding of the law before the start of the Master’s programme. You can acquire this knowledge by completing the premaster during the spring semester. After successful completing the programme you have proven knowledge of the relevant areas of law, such as European and international law, and will be eligible for the Master’s programme. A similar premaster is offered for students of International Relations, which deepens the knowledge of governance structures and legal frameworks.

This master’s programme degree offers you current academic insights to develop knowledge about the topics discussed. In addition, by means of guest speakers, excursions, internships and research, you will gain practical experience with digitalisation issues in a public sector context. After this study, you will have all the necessary skills allowing you to successfully pursue a meaningful career in this highly dynamic and complex environment.

This master responds to an increasing demand of the labour market, since there is a great need for lawyers with knowledge of public administration to deal with the issues of digitalisation. As a graduate of this programme, you will be highly demanded by employers.

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Facts & Figures
Degree
LLM in Law and Public Administration
Course type
Master
Duration
12 months (60 ECTS)
Croho code
66461
Language of instruction
English
Start
September
Faculty
Law
Why study this programme in Leeuwarden?

The English-taught LLM Governance and Law in Digital Society combines two distinctive disciplines: Law and Public Administration in order to study consequences of IT (including privacy, safety and security), making it unique in the Netherlands.

Further, the LLM is taught at the University of Groningen's Campus Fryslan in Leeuwarden, offering a chance for a more personalized study experience within a small classroom setting.

Programme

Governance and Law in Digital Society is a one year programme, consisting of lectures, a seminar, an internship and a master's thesis. The first semester comprises of various courses on key themes of governance and law in a digital society, focusing on issues such as privacy, safety and security, but also the construction of effective cooperation and efficient delivery through sharing and analyzing data.

The focus is not only on becoming familiar with theoretical concepts, but also on developing research skills. During the programme you will become familiar with problems the public sector faces. You will gain practical experience through guest lectures and discussions about present-day topics of organisation such as the National Police Corps, Europol, consultancy agencies, or governmental organisations as broad as local authorities or the Immigration Services.

The second semester is aimed at deepening this knowledge. The semester starts with two additional courses. Furthermore, students will become familiar with the current practice through an internship. The final assessment is a master thesis, which is written for an organisation of preference, that will answer a scientific question of practical importance by combining a juridical analysis and social scientific research.

Please note, course names and schedules in the overview below are occasionally subject to change. You can find the full course descriptions in Ocasys by clicking the link 'Course Catalog' in the schedule.

Periods
CoursesCourse Catalog >1234
Policy science in digital society (6 EC)
Supervision & Enforcement in digital society (6 EC)
Seminar Policy Analysis (6 EC)
Modern Public Management (6 EC)
Security & Privacy in Digital Society (6 EC)
Cyber Crime (5 EC)
Regulation of digital technologies (5 EC)
Thesis Project (20 EC)
Programme options
Master's Honours Programme (honours program)

The Master's Honours Programme was developed especially for students who want to get more from their studies.

It is a programme worth 15 ECTS that is followed in addition to the standard Master's programme. It is a one-year interdisciplinary programme that is designed to introduce students to various aspects of leadership.

More information about this option

Study abroad

  • Study abroad is optional
  • For an average of 20 weeks
  • Maximum of 30 EC
Entry requirements

Transfer options

Study programmeOrganizationTransition
Applied Safety & Security Studiesnhlstenden

Additional requirements

More information:

De bacheloropleidingen Bestuurskunde, Integrale veiligheid en HBO recht aan de NHL geven toegang mits hiervoor speciaal voorbereide minoren (aangeboden vanaf 2017) zijn opgenomen. Neem voor vragen contact op met studieadvies (studieadvies-rechten rug.nl) of opleidingscoördinator (b.brink rug.nl)

Lawnhlstenden

Additional requirements

More information:

De bacheloropleidingen Bestuurskunde, Integrale veiligheid en HBO recht aan de NHL geven toegang mits hiervoor speciaal voorbereide minoren (aangeboden vanaf 2017) zijn opgenomen. Neem voor vragen contact op met studieadvies (studieadvies-rechten rug.nl) of opleidingscoördinator (b.brink rug.nl)

Study programmeOrganizationTransition
International and European LawUniversity of GroningenNo additional requirements
LawUniversity of Groningen

No additional requirements

More information:

Extra informatie: De afstudeerrichting Jur. Bestuurskunde binnen de bachelor Rechtsgeleerdheid geeft een drempelloze toelating. Andere afstudeerrichtingen binnen de bachelor Rechtsgeleerdheid dienen aangevuld te worden met essentiële instroomvakken. Neem daarvoor contact op met de studieadviseur.

Juridische BestuurskundeUniversity of GroningenNo additional requirements

Admission requirements

Specific requirementsMore information
language test

You will need to provide proof of English language proficiency:

  • TOEFL: 100 (all sections need to be at least 21; the writing section needs to be at least 23)
  • IELTS: 7 (all sections need to be at least 6.0; the writing section needs to be at least 6.5)
  • Cambridge C2 Proficiency (CPE, Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English);
  • Cambridge C1 Advanced (CAE, Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English)
  • Applicants who are taking/have completed an English-taught bachelor programme at a Dutch research university may be exempt from taking an English proficiency test.
  • For more details about language requirements please check: https://bit.ly/2Ho7gkM

The test scores cannot be older than two years. Native speakers of English may request exemption from providing proof of proficiency. When you have completed an English-taught bachelor's programme at a university in the Netherlands you are exempt from the above language requirements.

previous education

Since the programme Governance and Law in Digital Society (GLDS) is a mix of law and social sciences, most students will have to participate in a pre-LLM programme in order to be admitted. Therefore, two types of pre-LLM programmes are presented here: an intensive online Pre-LLM for law students and regular pre-LLMs for social science students and for International Relations: https://www.rug.nl/rechten/education/international-programmes/llm/applicants-with-non-law-bachelors-degrees/pre-llm-governance-and-law-in-digital-society

Please note, students with a bachelor of Law of the University of Groningen, with the specialisation Juridische Bestuurskunde, are directly admissible. Also for graduates of a bachelor in Public Administration, Applied Safety & Security Studies or Law at NHL Stenden with the integrated premaster direct admission is possible.

reference letter

Candidates must provide one letter of reference from an academic referee who has detailed knowledge of their academic records. The reference can be emailed to the Admission Office from your referee's institutional e-mail address or uploaded in the Online Application System. The uploaded letter should be on a letterhead and signed by the referee and must contain contact details of your referee, including his or her institutional e-mail address. More information can be found at: www.rug.nl/rechten/education/international-programmes/llm/application/admission-requirements

written request

Applicants must send a motivation letter (max. 650 words). The letter should be written by the applicants themselves; it is not allowed to submit an (official) translation.

Application deadlines

Type of studentDeadlineStart course
Dutch students01 May 202101 September 2021
EU/EEA students01 May 202101 September 2021
non-EU/EEA students01 May 202101 September 2021

Admission requirements

Specific requirementsMore information
grade average

On top of providing the Admissions Board with transcripts and diplomas, students should have an equivalent minimum GPA (Grade Point Average) of 7/10 (Dutch grading scale).

language test

Native speakers of English may request exemption from providing proof of proficiency. Otherwise you will need to provide proof of English language proficiency:

  • TOEFL: 100 (all sections need to be at least 21; the writing section needs to be at least 23)
  • IELTS: 7 (all sections need to be at least 6.0; the writing section needs to be at least 6.5)
  • Cambridge C2 Proficiency (CPE, Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English);
  • Cambridge C1 Advanced (CAE, Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English)
  • Applicants who are taking/have completed an English-taught bachelor programme at a Dutch research university may be exempt from taking an English proficiency test.
  • For more details about language requirements please check: https://bit.ly/2Ho7gkM

The test scores cannot be older than two years.

previous education

Since the programme Governance and Law in Digital Society (GLDS) is a mix of law and social sciences, most students will have to participate in a pre-LLM programme in order to be admitted. Therefore, two types of pre-LLM programmes are presented here: an intensive online Pre-LLM for law students and regular pre-LLMs for social science students and for International Relations: https://www.rug.nl/rechten/education/international-programmes/llm/applicants-with-non-law-bachelors-degrees/pre-llm-governance-and-law-in-digital-society

Please note, students with a bachelor of Law of the University of Groningen, with the specialisation Juridische Bestuurskunde, are directly admissible. Also for graduates of a bachelor in Public Administration, Applied Safety & Security Studies or Law at NHL Stenden with the integrated premaster direct admission is possible.

reference letter

Candidates must provide one letter of reference from an academic referee who has detailed knowledge of their academic records. The reference can be emailed to the Admission Office from your referee's institutional e-mail address or uploaded in the Online Application System. The uploaded letter should be on a letterhead and signed by the referee and must contain contact details of your referee, including his or her institutional e-mail address. More information can be found at : http://www.rug.nl/rechten/education/international-programmes/llm/application/admission-requirements

written request

Applicants must send a motivation letter (max. 650 words). The letter should be written by the applicants themselves; it is not allowed to submit an (official) translation.

Application deadlines

Type of studentDeadlineStart course
Dutch students01 May 202101 September 2021
EU/EEA students01 May 202101 September 2021
non-EU/EEA students01 May 202101 September 2021
Tuition fees
NationalityYearFeeProgramme form
EU/EEA2020-2021€ 2143full-time
non-EU/EEA2020-2021€ 15000full-time
EU/EEA2021-2022€ 2168full-time
non-EU/EEA2021-2022€ 15900full-time

Practical information for:

After your studies

Job prospects

In the job market, there is a clear demand for graduates with an interdisciplinary profile capable of interpreting development in digital society and responding to them accordingly. The Master's programme is designed to meet the increasing demand and prepare students for a career within the field.

Graduates of this programme go on to work in a variety of positions in the public sector. Career opportunities are not limited to traditional authorities such as ministries or subnational authorities but also found within organizations surrounding them, for example the Public Prosecution Service, consultancy agencies and the police organisation.

Further, all students have access to the university Careers Services Law which can help them in finding and preparing for internships and employment.

Job examples

  • Data specialist, coordinator of a shared data centre or information manager at a subnational authority
  • Consultant, for example of IT risks, digital transformation, digital safety or law enforcement in digital society
  • Specialist at a regulatory body, such the Data Protection Authority
Research

Research of Governance and Law in Digital Society is located both on Campus Fryslân as at the Faculty of Law of the University Groningen. Campus Fryslân is a unique faculty based in Leeuwarden. Unique because multiple disciplines are represented there. This enables international students, PhD's and world-class researchers to approach scientific questions from different perspectives. Using this approach, the faculty is dedicated to find local solutions for real-world global challenges.

The staff involved in Governance and Law in Digital Society conducts research on many different fields of the digitalising society. As an example, dr. Evgeni Moyakine, Assistant Professor at the IT Law Section of the Department of Transboundary Legal Studies of the University of Groningen and dr. Oskar Gstrein, Assistant Professor at the department of Governance and Innovation and member of the Data Research Centre at Campus Fryslân, are experts in the fields of cyber security, privacy and data protection.

In the modern globalised world, privacy and security are two topics that do not lose their relevance. To the contrary, they seem to become even more important to all of us. The 2017 WannaCry and NotPetya malware attacks, the 2018 Cambridge Analytica scandal, the 2019 leak of personal data of more than 400 million Facebook users… these are just a few examples of the incidents with a global impact and worldwide ramifications that have shocked the public and raised many questions that unfortunately largely remain unanswered. How does one effectively protect the most fundamental rights and freedoms in a technology-driven society? To what extent are the legal instruments and policies adopted at various levels capable of preventing cyber incidents and data breaches? What would be the preferred methods for imputing responsibility of those who are engaged in different types of illicit activities in the digital domain?

As experts in the fields of cyber security, privacy and data protection, the lecturers adopt a multidisciplinary approach to addressing a myriad of issues arising in this area and implement it in their course “Security & Privacy in Digital Society”. By delving into the sea of concepts, theories and ideas presented and explained in the lectures and working groups, students acquire knowledge about the existing governance structures and legal developments associated with security and privacy that must be comprehended for generating solutions to the problems posed by digitalization. They coherently analyse various legal acts, case law, policies and other sources and actively cooperate in groups in order to formulate own opinions and valid arguments and defend them in a sound professional manner. By doing so, students gain all necessary skills allowing them to successfully pursue a meaningful career in this highly dynamic and complex environment.

Students also conduct research as part of their studies. Among other things, student from this degree have studied information exchange between governmental institutions, for example to tackle abuse of social security provision, for real time intelligence or predictive policing. They have also looked into the need for better IT-management within public authorities and the benefits and risks of private party involvement in governmental IT-driven projects.

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  • 
						Testimonial of Nynke Dijkstra

    The study responds to current events and the field of study is constantly evolving

    – Nynke Dijkstra
    Read more

    After obtaining a bachelor's degree in Sociology from the RuG, I decided to follow a pre-master to gain access to the master's degree in Governance and Law in Digital Society.

    This master's programme appealed to me enormously, because the field of law is so topical. Technological developments are ongoing, more and more devices are being connected to the internet. Digitisation is ubiquitous and although there are advantages to it, there is also a downside: today's society has become increasingly dependent on technology, and we have to deal with new security issues.

    During the year, several of issues were discussed. For example, different laws and regulations were discussed that have been introduced in the field of cybercrime and data protection. In addition, we have devoted a great deal of attention to the digitisation of government and government services, for example through the use of algorithms and automated decision-making.

    The internship, which is part of the master's programme, allows you to gain practical experience and apply the knowledge gained from the various subjects in practice. In addition to an internship assignment, it is also possible to write your thesis for an organisation.

    During my master's degree I gained a lot of knowledge about policy making and various laws and regulations in the field of privacy and cybercrime. Through my internship, I was able to apply my knowledge in practice and get a better idea of what I wanted to do after my master's degree.

    I graduated in July 2019, but even before I was given a contract as a Cyber Trainee at the Dutch I-Traineeship. This traineeship lasts 2 years, during which I will work for three clients for 8 months periods. My first assignment is at the Lower House, where I am responsible for information security policy and security awareness.

    I can strongly recommend the master in Governance and Law in Digital Society. The study responds to current events and the field of study is constantly evolving.

    Close
  • 
						Testimonial of Jorn Travaille

    Jorn Travaille , Netherlands, LLM in Law and Governance in Digital Society

    – Jorn Travaille
    Read more

    Last year I graduated from the University of Groningen with a bachelors degree in Public Administration. I lived in Groningen for four years with great pleasure, but I thought it was time for something else.

    My interest in the UG Campus Fryslân (in Leeuwarden) was aroused, because the university was going to offer master programs that deal with contemporary problems there.

    I was looking for a study that would enable me to help solve social problems and involve my special interest in digitization. For that reason the choice for the master program Law and Governance in Digital Society was made quickly.

    I have lived in Leeuwarden since September 2018 and it is a vibrant and cozy city. In addition, it was also pretty easy to get a nice and affordable apartment. I like studying at Campus Fryslân; there is a positive atmosphere and they organize interesting lectures with notable experts, for example former Secretary General of NATO Jaap de Hoop Scheffer. Another interesting thing is that students in the LLM have different backgrounds, such as sociologists, lawyers, and safety experts. This multidisciplinarity presence in the classroom provides useful discussions which help me to develop a broader view on certain issues.

    The programme provides insight into privacy issues, enforcement, and the policy process. I personally like the cyber security courses the most, because it is a subject that is currently developing very quickly within contemporary society. I get the feeling that I am studying something that matters, something that is in the center of political interest. For these reasons I would definitely recommend this LLM.


    Close
  • 
						Testimonial of Lucas Haitsma

    Starting my LLM programme in Governance and Law in Digital Society

    – Lucas Haitsma
    Read more

    When looking for an LLM program, I was looking for one that that I could tailor to my interests, as well as offer some working experience. During my bachelor's degree in International and European Law and my first master's degree in Global Criminal Law, I developed an interest in cybercrime and the problems it posed for law enforcement and I wanted to further cultivate this interest.

    I was also looking for a master’s program that would help me expand beyond a specifically law perspective and provide me with a policy and governance outlook. I really wanted to build up some practical experience as I had already spent quite some years in academia and thus wanted to put some of my knowledge and skills into practice. This led me to the Governance and Law in Digital Society (GLDS) LLM.

    How did you hear about the programme and why did you choose to apply?

    I discovered the GLDS programme via Facebook. Prior to this, I was actually planning to do a different, second LLM that I was not entirely sold on. As soon as I learned more about the GLDS programme, I knew that it was exactly what I was looking for. Within a matter of days, I cancelled my enrollment to the other LLM, and applied and enrolled for the GLDS summer school and degree program. I look back very favorably on that decision. I ultimately chose the GLDS LLM because it was exactly what I wanted. I saw that the LLM was partially based on projects which provided me with an excellent opportunity to tailor such to my interest in cybercrime. The GLDS programme was also quite attractive to me because it involved many guest lectures from people who work in fields related to digitalization, there were several seminars, and there was the possibility for an internship. The internship was also a big selling point for me as this is rare for an LLM programme and it meant that I would not only graduate with a degree but also working experience. Lastly, the master’s provided me with an opportunity to branch out from my law education and dive deeper into how policy and governance play a role in the issue of cybercrime.

    How has your experience been so far with beginning the programme?

    So far, the program has been fantastic. I am currently working on a number of projects that fit my interests and am loving it. I am working on projects related to the enforcement of Dutch cybercrime legislation, predictive policing, and problems for law enforcement arising from the use of digital evidence. While I am working on projects related to cybercrime, my peers are working on other topics related to digitalization in the areas of finance, defense, government, and social media. What I have particularly enjoyed so far is the presentations given in guest lectures as it really gives you a feel for why graduates of this program are in high demand and an idea of the various organizations you can end up working for. Furthermore, all of the topics we have covered have been engaging and all of the classes have an interactive element.

    What are you looking forward to in the programme during the upcoming academic year?

    In the upcoming year I am especially looking forward to the internship placement. The internship I believe is a great opportunity to put some of our unique knowledge about digitalization into practice. Technology and digitalization are evolving at a very high rate and many companies are looking for students with expertise in the area of digitalization to help them navigate this high paced environment. I am very much looking forward to making my own contributions in that area and conducting research in the field.

    - Lucas Haitsma, Netherlands, Governance and Law in Digitial Society student

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  • 
						Testimonial of

    A specialization for which there is a great demand in the market

    Read more

    As professor I am responsible for the Bachelor and Masters' tracks in Law and Governance. I teach within these tracks and carry out research. My research interests lie with the working of general and administrative law in practice and the functioning of the public sector and specific parts thereof .

    My job gives me the opportunity to satisfy my curiosity about how legal arrangements work in practice. I find the workings of the public sector the most interesting because that affects us all.

    This track provides a specialization for which there is a great demand in the market. Our society is digitizing at a rapid pace and that raises questions about the ways in which the public sector can and should react. In particular, issues of digital security receive a lot of attention – from security of financial transactions to security in elections, as well as public order and safety in the physical world, which is also influenced by developments of digital technology.

    This is the right track for you if you are interested in problems at the intersection of government, market and society and in particular the consequences of digitization for the ways in which our society works and should be governed.

    This is a track with a very interesting profile for the job market and an interdisciplinary setup that deals with current problems that affect all of us.


    Close
  • 
						Testimonial of Evgeni Moyakine

    As an Assistant Professor I am involved in various teaching and supervision activities connected to cyber security, privacy and data protection

    – Evgeni Moyakine
    Read more

    As an Assistant Professor at the IT Law Section of the Department of Transboundary Legal Studies of the University of Groningen, I am involved in various teaching and supervision activities connected to cyber security, privacy and data protection. In addition, I continue to carry out research concerning the processing of personal data by State and non-State actors and the issue of international responsibility for cyber operations. From the privacy and data protection perspective, it is rather problematic to learn that governments can engage in electronic surveillance of their citizens without taking into account human rights and freedoms of those who are being surveilled. The same concerns can be raised with regard to cyber activities of private persons and entities who cause different forms of harm to others but operate on behalf of States and together with them manage to escape responsibility. Therefore, it is crucial to stand still and think about not only the existing legal norms and principles but also their interpretation in the light of these developments stemming from the cyberspace and having a tangible impact in the physical world.

    Close
  • 
						Testimonial of Oskar  Gstrein

    For the teaching in this program insights from the EU-funded “Cutting Crime Impact” are of great relevance.

    – Oskar Gstrein
    Read more

    I am Assistant Professor at the department of Governance and Innovation at Campus Fryslân, where I am also member of the Data Research Centre. With my background in law and philosophy I explore topics such as human rights in the digital age, security and surveillance in context of the rule of law, privacy and data protection, digital identity, as well as the use of digital technologies for governance purposes. I combine my teaching with insights from ongoing research on the use of state-of-the-art technologies such as predictive policing or blockchain applications. For the teaching in this program insights from the EU-funded “Cutting Crime Impact” project are of great relevance. In this project we collaborate with law enforcement agencies and security experts from the Netherlands and all over Europe. We research the impact of ethical, legal and social aspects on the design of innovative security technologies. Finally, for this master we frequently organize excursions to international and national institutions so that students get the chance to exchange with practitioners on relevant topics (e.g. dark-web investigations) and receive the opportunity to enhance their network.

    Close

Day in the Life of an LLM Governance and Law in a Digital Society Student

Hi! My name is Lucas Haitsma, I am 23-years-old and half Dutch and half American. After pursuing my bachelor in International and European Law and then a first masters in Global Criminal Law, I am now pursuing a second masters in the area of Governance and Law in a Digital Society (GLDS) at Campus Fryslân!

Governance and Law in a Digital Society (GLDS) students study the challenges arising from an increasingly digitalised society. We examine the possibilities that digitalisation offers organisations, but also the social problems that arise from digitalisation and the role the public administration and law plays in solving these issues. If you are interested in what the day in the life of a GLDS Student looks like, then you are in the right place!

It is a Tuesday today in Block 1 – that means my class today will start at around 10.45 and finish at about 17.00

7:30 AM – Wake up

While some of my classmates live in Leeuwarden, I live in Groningen which means I have to commute to Leeuwarden on the days when I have class. I like to be at the campus by 9.30, which means catching the train from Groningen at 8.42 and being out of the door by 8.30.

8:42 AM – Train Ride

Like many of my classmates, I take the train to get to Leeuwarden. I very much enjoy taking the train as it helps me to structure my day. I will usually take this time to plan out my day/week, work on any assignments, or do any readings that I still need to finish.

9:15 AM – Arrival in Leeuwarden

Once I arrive in Leeuwarden, I walk 5 minutes from the train station to Campus Fryslân. Once at the campus, I walk through the sliding doors, disinfect my hands, greet the secretary, and head upstairs to find a study spot and keep working before class.

10:45 AM - Class – Policy Analysis

My first class is policy analysis, a project-based class involving a lot of discussions. This is one of my favourite classes of the block as it involves looking at real policy challenges related to digitalisation and thinking about the underlying problems in order to come up with possible solutions. This class is great and I like it a lot as it involves a lot of critical thinking and interesting discussions. In the class itself, we explain our policy problems to each other, our possible solutions and talk with each other to get feedback on it. In a multidisciplinary study, such feedback is incredibly valuable as it encourages you to think about problems and solutions from different angles and perspectives.

12:30 PM – Lunch

After the first class, I head to the cafeteria to get something to eat like soup or a sandwich. I will normally sit with people from class and discuss the material from class, work on any group projects, or just general chit-chat.

13:15 PM – Class – Policy Science in a Digital Society Lecture

After lunch, I head back to class. Policy science in a digital society is incredibly interesting as we discuss topics such as choices based on big data, automated decision-making and enforcement, and transparency. This class combines lectures from teachers specialised in these areas as well as guest lecturers from companies and governmental organisations. Today, we have a guest lecturer from a company developing AI technology who will be talking about AI and the societal implications of such technology.

15:00 PM – Quick coffee break

In between class, as people hit the afternoon dip, it’s nice to all grab a quick cup of coffee to spruce us up for the final class. This is a great opportunity to talk to classmates, teachers, and ask any questions to guest lecturers.

15:15 PM – Policy Science in a Digital Society Seminar

Seminars provide a fantastic opportunity for students to become the teachers of a certain topic. Each student gives a presentation related to one of the topics of policy science in a digital society. Today, it is my turn to give a presentation and I will be presenting about how AI is used by the Dutch police to predict where crime will occur. Giving such a presentation is a great opportunity to become an expert on a certain topic and share it with your classmates. The presentations always end up in discussions in which people of different academic backgrounds can share their opinions about the topic presented.

17:00 PM – Finish class and head to the station

After class, I talk to classmates for a bit and then head to the station to catch the train back to Groningen at 17.21. In the train, I will do some more work such as working on my Dutch and my programming skills.

18:09 PM – Arrival in Groningen and of the working day

I get back to Groningen at 18.09 at which point I will usually go to the gym before heading home to eat and wind down for the evening. My typical evening activities will consist of hanging out with some friends, having a drink, watching some series, or hanging out with my girlfriend.

Read more
Student profile

The Master's track in Governance & Law in Digital Society is an interdisciplinary track for students with a legal or social sciences profile. Both groups of students will first have to complete a Pre-Master's programme to ensure adequate mastery of key competences and knowledge.

For Noordelijke Hogeschool Leeuwarden (NHL) graduates in Public Administration, Applied Safety & Security Studies and Law this is achieved through a set of Minors in their own programme. Other students must follow a Pre-Master's programme. The admission requirements for international students are still being considered; these do not, of course, lie in the area of Dutch law, but in the areas of European and international law.

Study support

If you come across questions with regard to your programme, study progress, your way of studying, personal circumstances, etc., you can go to the International Office for guidance. All discussed in these conversations is treated confidentially.