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UniversiteitsbibliotheekOpen AccessBeleid RUG/UMCG ‘Green open access’

Go green: be fair

Go green: be fair
Go green: be fair

Green open access eliminates the barriers which prevent fellow researchers in the ‘Global South’ from accessing your research results.

Want academic knowledge to be equally accessible all over the world?

Go green open access: Deposit your publications in the University’s research database Pure and make them freely accessible. The University of Groningen Library and the Central Medical Library handle all copyright and licensing issues for you.


This advantage of (green) open access is mentioned in the Budapest Open Access Initiative , 2001: "Removing access barriers will accelerate research, enrich education, share the learning of the rich with the poor and the poor with the rich, make this literature as useful as it can be, and lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge." Unrestricted access to material allow equality of learning in poor as well as in rich nations.

UNESCO , known as the ‘intellectual’ agency of the United Nations, supports open access for the benefit of the global flow of knowledge, innovations and equitable socio-economic development. Open access is one of the three pillars of UNESCO’s approach to increase access to scientific knowledge, together with the promotion of Free and Open Software and of Open Educational Resources. Open access facilitates the communication of research findings worldwide, according to UNESCO. It has implications for the research output in the Global South. This can have important spin-offs for economic development. [1] (See also this UNESCO website)

Also at national level the importance of (green) open access for the Global South is clear. Karl Dittrich, President of the VSNU (association of universities in the Netherlands) says: “I think that if all knowledge becomes available open access, this can give a big boost to the scientific community itself. Think of the Third World that can easily participate in the scientific debate if it is not all behind a pay wall.” [2]

Finally a quote of Andrej Zwitter , professor of International Relations at the University of Groningen. In an interview published in the University of Groningen open access newsletter in April 2015, he held a plea for open access. For him the most important argument for (green) open access is the human rights issue: "There are plenty of researchers that do not have access to a lot of research, research that would be very important for their own country, and that would advance the human rights standards internationally, but they cannot access it because it is paid. ……So, in my opinion, open access is a key principle of supporting the right to development, and this is an obligation of states anyway according to the United Nations Charter: the right to development of other countries. Open access will help to close the gap that we have now between the different worlds: the world of the developed, industrial countries versus the world of the developing countries. To close this gap, open access research is necessary." This advantage of (green) open access is mentioned in the Budapest Open Access Initiative , 2001: "Removing access barriers will accelerate research, enrich education, share the learning of the rich with the poor and the poor with the rich, make this literature as useful as it can be, and lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge."


Laatst gewijzigd:17 november 2017 11:41
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