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GIA obtains substantial NWO grant for research into the effects of the giant Bronze Age eruption of Mount Vesuvius

16 January 2015

The Groningen Institute of Archaeology recently received an NWO grant of €750.000,- for interdisciplinary research into the cultural and demographic effects of the giant Bronze Age eruption of Mount Vesuvius. The grant was awarded to researchers dr. Martijn van Leusen and prof. dr. Peter Attema.

Eruption of Mount Vesuvius

Around 1995 BC, during the Early Bronze Age, a giant eruption of Mount Vesuvius buried a flourishing landscape of villages and fields in the plains to the north and east of the volcano under more than a meter of ash. Inhabitants of Campanian sites such as Nola (‘the Bronze Age Pompeii’) barely escaped with their lives. Italian archaeological research since the 1980s has already shown that the population of the Campanian plain did not fully recover for several centuries after this so-called ‘Avellino Event’, but no one has yet wondered where the substantial Early Bronze Age population of Campania could have sought refuge, or what impacts it would have had there.

Attema's and Van Leusen hypothesis is that given the topography of central-southern Italy, the most likely refuge area will have been to the north, in the coastal zone of what is now South Lazio. Here, two wetland coastal plains – the Fondi basin and the Agro Pontino - could have provided the space and resources to absorb the fleeing population. The research team consisting of three postdoctoral researchers and two assistants, will be hosted at the Groningen Institute of Archaeology and the Archaeobotany department of the Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University.

More information

Prof. dr. P.A.J. Attema

Dr. Martijn van Leusen

People fleeing with their cattle from a recent eruption of Mt. Sinabong (Indonesia)
People fleeing with their cattle from a recent eruption of Mt. Sinabong (Indonesia)
Household items left behind in the Bronze Age village of Nola
Household items left behind in the Bronze Age village of Nola
Last modified:12 June 2019 4.34 p.m.
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