Skip to ContentSkip to Navigation
Over onsWaar vindt u onsprof. dr. E.M. (Linda) Steg

prof. dr. E.M. Steg

Hoogleraar

Efficient demand and supply matching by incentivizing end-users in buildings

The project aims to develop and test an interdisciplinary framework for a reliable, efficient, sustainable, and socially acceptable electricity grid with distributed generation and storage of energy. We develop control algorithms and an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) platform coupled with automation to optimize matching of demand and supply that are acceptable to users in buildings. We examine which type of automation, and which financial and social incentives are acceptable and effective to promote demand-supply matching among users. The control algorithms combine the physics and communication constraints of the electricity grid with user incentives. The platform interfaces users with the grid, thereby considering their needs, indoor information, congestion, prices and control signals, to coordinate the energy consumption of buildings. We first evaluate our framework in living-lab settings, and then implement it in the Power Matching City, a futuristic field lab in the Netherlands. The project is funded by the European Research Area Network – Smart Grid Plus.

Responsible decision making on gas: how individual and institutional factors influence public evaluations of gas

This project aims to advance responsible decision-making on gas. The use and production of gas is causing controversies, as reflected in debates about the earthquakes in Groningen, production activities at vulnerable locations, shale gas, imports from Russia, and its fossil nature. At the same time, it is advocated that gas can play an important role in the sustainable energy transition, for instance through innovations such as green gas and power-to-gas. It is a societal and ethical challenge to determine what role, if any, gas can play in the (future) energy system. For that, it is crucial to understand how the public, authorities and other stakeholders evaluate gas, what causes concerns about gas, and how to adequately address and weigh these concerns in responsible decision-making. We will study how individual factors (such as values, moral considerations) and institutional factors (such as governance structures, participation) influence public evaluations of gas. We will analyse key industry and governmental stakeholders’ views on gas, and how these views influence (intentionally or not) public evaluations. The project takes an interdisciplinary perspective, combining psychology, political science, science technology studies, institutional economics, and ethics. We will use a mixed methods approach drawing upon these disciplines to analyse changes in public and stakeholder evaluations of gas over time. We will establish a longitudinal panel to monitor and explain these changes. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Designing innovative and socially responsible heating systems

Eliminating natural gas use from the built environment and replacing it with sustainable heating systems is vital in reaching our CO2 reduction targets. However, critical stakeholders are reluctant towards accepting innovative heating systems. (Semi)public actors question whether the benefits can legitimate investments and end-users are hesitant towards (collective) systems that may inhibit their freedom of choice: fairness and acceptability play key roles. We study to what extent these concerns, particularly related to fairness, can be mitigated. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Incentives and algorithms for efficient, reliable and socially acceptable energy system integration (ERSAS)

This project aims to study how to develop efficient, reliable, sustainable and socially acceptable (decentralised) energy system integration (ESI) from an interdisciplinary perspective. We will examine how to synergise infrastructure for gas, electricity and heat, and how to promote efficient use of such energy system by end users. In the psychological sub-project, we will examine the acceptability and effects of financial and social incentives that aim to encourage end-users to match energy demand to the local fluctuating supply of various renewable energy sources, as to increase the efficient use of the local energy grid. We will study the conditions under which different incentives are effective, as well why different incentives are (not) effective. Researchers from the Engineering and Technology Institute at the University of Groningen will examine how to synergise and couple infrastructure for gas, electricity and heat, and develop control algorithms that enhance the efficiency, stability and sustainability of such integrated energy systems. Together, we will study how effective incentives can be integrated in the algorithms aimed to control integrated energy systems. Also, we will study which factors affect the willingness of users to accept and use the proposed integrated system functionalities. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Urban Smart Measures and Incentives for quality of Life Enhancement (U-SMILE)

Accessibility and sustainability are important conditions for vital and resilient cities, but are under pressure especially in urban areas. Congestion, local air quality, parking; these are different challenges that, however, have in common that effective solutions require behavioural change in addition to technological innovation. This project aims to develop, test and evaluate “smart” measures to affect behaviour. The measures are smart in the first place because they offer an innovative mix of negative and positive financial incentives, thus bypassing some of the main disadvantages of pricing (notably a very limited acceptability) and of rewarding (in particular limited budgets and induced demand). The measures are also smart because they have a highly innovative technological character, not only from the conceptual viewpoint (e.g. tradable driving permits) but also from the technological perspective (e.g. linking real time automated vehicle identification to virtual market environments). These smart measures will be studied from a multidisciplinary perspective, where forces are joined among economists, psychologists, traffic engineers and policy analysts, and will be evaluated from the perspectives of effectiveness, acceptability, and efficiency - paying attention to key urban challenges such as accessibility and environmental quality. The project has a very strong rooting in the urban reality as the case studies are undertaken jointly with Amsterdam Zuidas, Rotterdam, Groningen, and the Amsterdam ArenA area. In the psychological sub-project, we will study to what extent smart incentives can promote durable changes in a wide range of sustainable travel behaviours. We will examine the conditions under which smart incentives are likely to promote sustainable travel behaviour, and the processes that drive behaviour changes. We will study to what extent and how individual characteristics influence the effectiveness and acceptability of smart incentives. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Psychological, social and financial barriers to energy efficiency (PENNY)

This project aims to understand the behavioural mechanisms in energy efficiency, following an interdisciplinary behavioural science perspective. The project will study which psychological, social, economic, institutional and political factors influence energy efficiencyin the residential and industry sector. We wil consider energy use, invenstment in energy efficent products, as well as renovation of buildings. The project is funded bythe EU, Horizon2020.

´╗┐Effective and acceptable energy management systems and user interfaces to match energy demand and supply

This project aims to develop an energy managing system and related user interface that can match demand and supply from various energy sources and that is likely to be adopted and properly employed by (potential) users. Future energy systems will integrate energy from various sources, that can be tailored to user preferences. To secure efficiency of the system, the system requires almost continuous decisions making. We will study the impact of user autonomy versus system automatisation in these decisions, as well as the effects of feedback to encourage energy conservation. We will collaborate with researchers from the faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences of the University of Groningen, in order to design effective and acceptable user interfaces. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Smart Farmer Grid 2.0

This project aims to study the optimal design of a smart grid infrastructure in rural argicultural areas. We will study techonological, rural, social and behavioural aspects that promote the efficiency of rural smart energy infrastructures. The project is funded by the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO). 

Developing socially responsible innovations: The role of values and moral emotions

This project aims to develop an innovative emotion-based design perspective for socially responsible innovations that are acceptable and justifiable on ethical grounds. This is important considering the emotional controversies with regard to many societal challenges related to climate change, energy and resource use, and water and food security. Emotions are commonly seen as “irrational” in decision-making. Traditional approaches aim at inducing positive responses to innovations, but they typically neglect values and moral considerations underlying emotional responses, making these approaches less effective and even ethically dubious. We propose that people’s important values predict their emotional responses to innovations, which in turn drive public acceptability. Values and emotions can therefore play a constructive role in developing socially responsible innovations. Our perspective is relevant for many sectors and different (cultural) contexts, since we examine general ethical principles and emotional processes. Therefore, we collaborate with private partners that are active in different sectors where controversial innovations are being developed. We will develop guidelines on how to incorporate values and emotions in developing socially responsible innovations. This is pivotal for developing new governance models targeting socially responsible innovations. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Acceptability of a sustianable energy transition

´╗┐This project aims to study which factors affect public support for a sustainable energy transition, including the acceptability of energy sources, sustainable energy technologies, energy infrastructures (including smart grids, and energy policies. We will study the role of individual factors (such as values, familiarity, knowledge) and contextual factors (including characteristics of energy sources, technologies, infrastructure, policies), as well as the role of fairness, justice, and compensation strategies. The projeect is funded by the Green Deal, a public-private partnership.

BeijIng Groningen Smart energy cities (BIGS)

Smart cities anticipate sustainable prosperity of their citizens. In order to accomplish this objective, the current development of cities is undergoing drastic technological shifts that need to be followed by innovative regulatory and behavioural changes with the final goal of increasing sustainability of cities. These changes require a strategy that integrates multiple disciplines and provides a comprehensive understanding and support from a psychological, technological and economic perspective. We propose an interdisciplinary framework that uses innovative and smart technologies to understand and promote sustainable use of energy and aid effective decisions by end-users. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Individual and contextual factors influencing recycling 

This project aims to study how individual factors, such as perceived costs and benefits and moral motivations, and contextual factors, such as characteristics of waste collection systems, affect recycling behaivour. The project is part of a large multidisciplinary project on sustainable packages. The project is funded by TI Food and Nutrition.

The power of the neighbourhood: the success and spreading of bottom-up initiatives at the energy market 

This project aims to examine individual and social factors influencing the success and spreading of local sustainable energy initiatives that encourage local residents to reduce their CO2 emissions by adopting renewable energy sources and engaging in energy saving behaviours. The project is funded by the Netherlands Enterprise Agency (RVO). 

User behaviour and mobility patterns in the context of major societal trends 

This project aims to investigate the current trends and needs in mobility within the EU. We will study to what extent the fulfilment of key psychological needs is accomplished by current mobility services among different groups in the EU (including the elderly), and what is needed to improve sustainable mobility among vulnerable road users. The project is funded by the EU, Horizon2020.

Realizing the smart grid: aligning consumer behaviour with technological opportunities

This project aims to examine which individual factors predict, explain, and influence consumer adoption and use of smart energy technologies that will result in a reduction of uncertainty in smart energy systems. The project is conducted by a multidisciplinary team of psychologists and innovations scientists. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Public support for gas production in the province of Groningen, The Netherlands

This project aims to examine people’s opinion about gas production in the province of Groningen, including perceptions and evaluations of risks and benefits of gas production, and trust in gas production companies and local and national governments.

Publictions based on this project:

Perlaviciute, G., & Steg, L. (2015). The influence of values on evaluations of energy alternatives. Renewable Energy, 77, 259-267.

Perlaviciute, G., & Steg, L. (2014). Contextual and psychological factors shaping evaluations and acceptability of energy alternatives: Integrated review and research agenda. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 35, 361-381.

Acceptability of gas in future energy systems

This project aims to study factors influencing the acceptability of gas in future energy systems. Among others, we consider the perceived advantages and disadvantages of gas now and in the future, and trust in gas production companies. The project is funded by the Topconsortia Knowledge and Innovation Gas (in Dutch: Topconsortia voor Kennis en Innovatie Gas) and Gasunie, the Netherlands.

Publictions based on this project:

Perlaviciute, G., Steg, L., & Hoekstra, E. J. (2016). Is gas perceived as sustainable? Insights from value-driven evaluations in the Netherlands. Energy Research & Social Science, 20, 55-62. doi: 10.1016/j.erss.2016.06.002

Smart grid - profitable for all

This project aims to develop and test innovative smart grid concepts that will promote the smart use of locally produced solar power and speed up the transition to sustainable renewable energy systems. We aim to facilitate households to manage their energy demand and supply as to optimise the use of locally generated solar power, which will ultimately reduce CO2 emissions. The project is funded by the municipalities of Utrecht and Amersfoort, and the province of Utrecht, and conducted by a large multidisciplinary team in which business organisations, consultants as well as scientists collaborate. For more information: http://www.smartgridtv.nl/

Publications based on this project:

Noppers, E.H., Keizer, K., Milovanovic, M., & Steg, L. (2016). The importance of instrumental, symbolic, and environmental attributes for the adoption of smart energy systems. Energy Policy, 98, 12-18. doi: 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.08.007

Van der Werff, E., & Steg, L. (2016). The psychology of participation and interest in smart energy systems: Comparing the value-belief-norm theory and the value-identity-personal norm model. Energy Research & Social Science, 22, 107-114. doi: 10.1016/j.erss.2016.08.022

Low Carbon at Work - LOCAW 

LOCAW aims to advance our understanding of the drivers of and barriers to sustainable lifestyles by an integrative investigation of the determinants of everyday practices and behaviours within large scale organisations. We will study which societal, organisational and individual factors affect environmental behaviour at the workplace, and the relationship between environmental behaviours at work and at home. 

LOCAW will examine large organizations in the public as well as the private sector, including light as well as heavy industry. The research will be undertaken in six countries: Italy, Romania, Spain, Sweden, The Netherlands and the UK. The research will be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team working in the areas of psychology, sociology, geography, business studies, and artificial intelligence. LOCAW is funded by the European Union FP7 Programme. The total budget for this project add up to € 1,9 million. For more information: http://www.locaw-fp7.com/

Publications based on this project:

Lindenberg, S., & Steg, L. (2013). What makes organizations in market democracies adopt environmentally-friendly policies?. In: A.H. Huffman & S.R. Klein (Eds.), Green Organizations: Driving Change with IO Psychology (pp. 93-114). New York, NY: Routledge.

Ruepert, A.M., Steg, L., & Keizer, K. (2015). Theoretical basis for organizational pro-environmental research. In: J.L. Robertson & J. Barling (Eds.), The psychology of green organizations (pp. 33-57). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Ruepert, A., Keizer, K., Steg, L., Maricchiolo, F., Carrus, G., Dumitru, A., García Mira, R., Stancu, A., & Moza, D. (2016). Environmental considerations in the organizational context: A pathway to pro-environmental behaviour at work. Energy Research & Social Science, 17, 59-70. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2016.04.004

Creating Innovative Sustainability Pathways - CRISP

CRISP seeks to identify potential pathways that will aid the EU towards the transition to a sustainable, low carbon Europe. To meet this challenge, CRISP reviews current policies and practical case studies to figure out where we are at the moment. We then plan to develop and evaluate alternative scenarios for the future so that we than can find ways in which we can bridge the gap between where we are today, and where specifically we want to be in the future. A key feature of CRISP is the involvement and participation with school pupils, as well as experts and individuals, companies and governments. We are funded by FP7, the European Union Framework 7 research programme and are a team of partners from Greece, Hungary, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway and UK.
For more information: http://www.crisp-futures.eu/

Publications based on this project:

Venhoeven, L.A., Bolderdijk, J.W., & Steg, L. (2013). Explaining the paradox: How pro-environmental behaviour can both thwart and foster well-being. Sustainability, 5, 1372-1386. doi:10.3390/su5041372.

Venhoeven, L.A., Bolderdijk, J.W., & Steg, L. (2016). Why acting environmentally-friendly feels good: Exploring the role of self-image. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 1846. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01846

Venhoeven, L., Steg, L., & Bolderdijk, J.W. (2016). Can engagement in environmentally-friendly behavior increase well-being? In G. Fleury-Bahi, E. Pol, & O. Navarro (Eds.), Handbook of Environmental Psychology and quality of life research (pp. 229-237). Cham: Springer. DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-31416-7_13

MApping the contextual Conditions of REsilient Decentralized Energy Systems - MACREDES.

MACREDES studies factors influencing the promotion and success of decentralised energy systems and on the transition from a conventional to a more sustainable energy system. We will study technological, economic, social and spatial characteristics of decentralised energy systems in an integrated way. MACREDES is funded by the EDGaR (Energy Delta Gas Research) program.

For more information: http://www.edgar-program.com/ 

Publications based on this project:

Noppers, E.H., Keizer, K.E., Bolderdijk, J.W., & Steg, L. (2014). The adoption of sustainable innovations: driven by symbolic and environmental motives. Global Environmental Change, 25, 52-62. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2014.01.012

Leijten, F.R.M., Bolderdijk, J.W., Keizer, K., Gorsira, M., Van der Werff, E., & Steg, L. (2014). Factors that influence consumers' acceptance of future energy systems: The effects of adjustment type, production level, and price. Energy Efficiency, 7, 973-985. DOI 10.1007/s12053-014-9271-9.

The feasibility and impact of the transition to electric mobility in the Randstad

This project aims to understand barriers and enablers for the transition to electric cars. We will address two main questions:  

1. To what extent is a transition to electric vehicles acceptable to consumers, and how will such a transition influence car ownership and car use? (Project 1). 

2. Which factors are of crucial importance for the position of non-consumer stakeholders with respect to electric vehicles, and which policy strategies could stimulate these actors to cooperate so as to realize a successful introduction of electric vehicles? (Project 2).

The project is conducted by a multidisciplinary team of economists, psychologists, and transport policy researchers. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). For more information: http://www.nwo.nl/nwohome.nsf/pages/NWOP_8A7JF7

Publications based on this project:

Bockarjova, M., Knockaert, J., Rietveld, P., & Steg, L. (2015). De (toe)komst van elektrische auto’s in Nederland: voorkeuren van consumenten door het adoptieproces heen. Tijdschrift Vervoerswetenschap, 51 (2), 40-67.

Bockarjova, M., & Steg, L. (2014). Can Protection Motivation Theory predict pro-environmental behavior? Explaining the adoption of electric vehicles in the Netherlands. Global Environmental Change, 28, 276-288. DOI: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2014.06.010

Noppers, E., Keizer, K.E., Bockarjova, M., & Steg, L. (2015). The adoption of sustainable innovations: The role of instrumental, environmental, and symbolic attributes for earlier and later adopters. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 44, 74-84. doi:10.1016/j.jenvp.2015.09.002

Electric vehicles: early stage adoption processes 

Most research in the area of Electrical Vehicles (EVs) focuses on technical issues like battery capacity and charging systems. Much less attention is paid to the links between EVs and the wider society, including non-technical issues. In this proposal we focus on the early stages of (potential) market penetration of EVs, and in particular the role of early adopters (consumers and others). We aim (1) to understand the behaviour of crucial actors for the market introduction of EVs (2) to identify barriers and enablers for innovations in the first stage (3) to identify the role of actors in the ‘environment’ of early adopters (e.g. governments, firms, consumers), for these enablers and barriers. Project 1 “innovation transitions from an economic perspective” focuses on the behaviour of early adopters from an (evolutionary) economic systems perspective. Project 2 “innovation transitions from a behavioural-psychological perspective” studies the motivational factors influencing early adoption. Project 3 “the environment of early adopters from an innovation’s perspective” examines the role of crucial actors in the ‘environment’ of early adopters from the perspective of dynamic enablers and barriers’. Project 4, the integrative project, translates the findings to innovation theory, and to the EV arena, wider society and policy makers. We will use insights and approaches from innovation theories, evolutionary economics, several psychological theories (including the theory of the meaning of material possessions and goal framing theory), political economy, and management theories. Methods used include literature research, joint questionnaires, interviews, analysis of innovations in the past, modelling, and actor analysis.

The project is conducted by a multidisciplinary team of economists, psychologists, and transport policy researchers. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). For more information: http://www.nwo.nl/projecten.nsf/vk2010/ned/2300158424

Publications based on this project:

Noppers, E.H., Keizer, K.E., Bolderdijk, J.W., & Steg, L. (2014). The adoption of sustainable innovations: driven by symbolic and environmental motives. Global Environmental Change, 25, 52-62. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2014.01.012

Noppers, E., Keizer, K.E., Bockarjova, M., & Steg, L. (2015). The adoption of sustainable innovations: The role of instrumental, environmental, and symbolic attributes for earlier and later adopters. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 44, 74-84. doi:10.1016/j.jenvp.2015.09.002

Noppers, E.H., Keizer, K., Milovanovic, M., & Steg, L. (2016). The importance of instrumental, symbolic, and environmental attributes for the adoption of smart energy systems. Energy Policy, 98, 12-18. doi: 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.08.007

Tailored information technology to reduce residential energy use

This project aims to study effective ways to reduce household energy use via, taking into account thermal comfort, energy use behaviour, and technology, and their interactions. Also, we will study important preconditions for the effective introduction of monitoring and control technologies to manage household energy use. Among others, we will study the effects of different types of feedback on household energy use.

The project is conducted by a team of human biologists, technologists, and psychologists. The project is funded by AgentschapNL, EOS Long term research projects

For more information: http://www.agentschapnl.nl/content/intewon-individu-gerichte-informatie-technologie-voor-energiezuinig-wonen

Publications based on this project:

Taufik, D., Bolderdijk, J.W., & Steg, L. (2015). Acting green elicits a literal ‘warm glow’. Nature Climate Change, 5, 37-40. doi:10.1038/nclimate2449.

Taufik, D., Bolderdijk, J.W., & Steg, L. (2016). Going green? The relative importance of feelings over calculation in driving environmental intent in the Netherlands and the United States. Energy Research & Social Science, 22, 52-62. doi: 10.1016/j.erss.2016.08.012

Psychological aspects of future electricity supply: the role of Smart Storage

This project aimed to study factors influencing the acceptability of future renewable energy supply, and the acceptability of smart control systems. The project was funded by Alliander, the total budget was € 65,000.

Publications based on this project:

Bolderdijk, J.W., Gorsira, M., Keizer, K., & Steg, L. (2013). Values determine the (in)effectiveness of informational interventions in promoting pro-environmental behavior. PLoS ONE, 8 (12): e83911. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0083911.

Leijten, F.R.M., Bolderdijk, J.W., Keizer, K., Gorsira, M., Van der Werff, E., & Steg, L. (2014). Factors that influence consumers' acceptance of future energy systems: The effects of adjustment type, production level, and price. Energy Efficiency, 7, 973-985. DOI 10.1007/s12053-014-9271-9.

Evaluation of energy-efficient street lighting

This project aimed to study the effects of energy-efficient (i.e., LED) street lighting on preceived safety, and the acceptability of energy efficient street lighting. The project was funded by the municipality of Assen, the total budget was 65,000.

Publications based on this project:

Boomsma, C., & Steg, L. (2014). Feeling safe in the dark: Examining the effect of entrapment, lighting levels, and gender on feelings of safety and lighting policy acceptability. Environment and Behavior, 46 (2), 193-212. DOI: 10.1177/0013916512453838.

Boomsma, C., & Steg, L. (2014). The effect of information and values on acceptability of reduced street lighting Journal of Environmental Psychology, 39, 22-31. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvp.2013.11.004.

Innovative Pricing for Sustainable Mobility - i-PriSM

This research investigates how innovative pricing can contribute to achieving a more sustainable transport system, taking a broad perspective that encompasses multiple modes (notably road and public transport), multiple technologies within a mode ( e.g. electric vs. conventional fuel cars ), multiple actors (travellers and major stakeholders), and interactions between infrastructure and urban networks; and that considers the implementation and transition phase explicitly. This study takes a systems perspective. For effects assessment this includes transport-specific issues like interactions between road and public transport performance and pricing, but also mutual interactions with spatial urban markets (labour, housing, location). For acceptability research, this includes the explicit consideration of (strategic) behaviour of lobby groups, (local) governments, and other institutions. And for studying price setting, this involves the consideration of multiple (local or national) governments and/or multiple private road operators, competing on the same network.

The project is conducted by a multidisciplinary team of economists, psychologists, and transport researchers. The project is funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

For more information: http://www.nwo.nl/nwohome.nsf/pages/NWOP_7YJBF3

Publications based on this project:

Bolderdijk, J.W., Van der Werff, E., & Steg, L. (2016). De psychologische effecten van prijsprikkels. Tijdschrift Vervoerswetenschap, 52 (1), 3-17.

Bolderdijk, J.W., & Steg, L. (2015). Promoting sustainable consumption: The risks of using financial incentives. In: L.A. Reisch & J. Thøgersen (Eds.), Handbook of research in sustainable consumption (pp. 328-342). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar.

Governance, Infrastructure, Lifestyle Dynamics and Energy Demand: European post-carbon communities - GILDED

The overall goal of GILDED is to identify social, economic, cultural and political changes which could help rural and urban households in Europe consume less energy. While technological innovation can make low-carbon energy sources economically and environmentally viable, their impact in reducing carbon-intensive energy use will depend critically on broad public and political commitment to such a reduction. GILDED will target socio-economic, cultural and political influences on individual and household energy consumption through five regional case studies. Each case study focuses on a medium-sized city along with nearby rural areas. Investigating individuals’ lifestyle choices and their understanding of energy issues will provide insights into patterns of energy-related behaviours characterising emergent lifestyle types, and the particular drivers impacting on consumption decisions. The social, cultural and political contexts in which these behaviours are embedded will be addressed through analysis of the structural factors and actors (from local to EU level), including governance networks, physical environments, and materialized and institutionalized transport and provisioning networks. This combined ‘top down’ and ‘bottom-up’ perspective on household consumption will be utilised to inform the analysis of an energy-reduction initiative or experiment in each case study region. Principles derived from the lifestyle, structural and initiative studies will be utilised to structure agent-based models of policy implementation and change response.

GILDED is a three year collaborative research project funded through European Union Framework Programme Seven, running from December 2008-2011. For more information: www.gildedeu.org

Publications based on this project:

Van der Werff, E., & Steg, L. (2015). One model to predict them all: Predicting energy behaviours with the norm activation model. Energy Research & Social Science, 6, 8-14. doi: 10.1016/j.erss.2014.11.002

Van der Werff, E., & Steg, L. (2016). The psychology of participation and interest in smart energy systems: Comparing the value-belief-norm theory and the value-identity-personal norm model. Energy Research & Social Science, 22, 107-114. doi: 10.1016/j.erss.2016.08.022

Van der Werff, E., Steg, L., & Keizer, K.E. (2013). It is a moral issue: The relationship between environmental self-identity, obligation-based intrinsic motivation and pro-environmental behaviour. Global Environmental Change, 23, 1258-1265. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.07.018.

Van der Werff, E., Steg, L., & Keizer, K.E. (2013). The value of environmental self-identity: The relationship between biospheric values, environmental self-identity and environmental preferences, intentions and behavior. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 34, 55-63. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvp.2012.12.006.

Van der Werff, E., Steg, L., & Keizer, K. (2014). Follow the signal: When past pro-environmental actions signal who you are. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 40, 273-282. DOI 10.1016/jenvp.2014.07.004

Van der Werff, E., Steg, L., & Keizer, K.E. (2014). I am what I am, by looking past the present: The influence of biospheric values and past behaviour on environmental self-identity. Environment and Behavior, 46 (5), 626-657. DOI: 10.1177/0013916512475209.

Barriers for energy changes among end consumers and households - BARENERGY

The EU project BARENERGY aims to identify the relevance and strengths of various barriers for energy behaviour changes among end consumers and households, and to discuss how activities from political authorities, energy producers and NGOs can overcome these barriers.
It will address changes in consumer behaviour along two dimensions. The first is energy saving and improvement of energy efficiency within households, the second is changes toward more sustainable and renewable energy technologies. It is also concerned about the relationship between these three strategies; turn down and switch off, the purchase of energyefficient appliances, and shift to (more) sustainable energy carriers. BARENERGY combines an individual and institutional approach. This means that individual and household energy behaviour and changes in this behaviour can only be understood by countries with a substantial variation in institutional structure considering individual values, attitudes, norms and knowledge among individuals together with the context in which this behaviour takes place. For this reason, countries with a substantial variation in institutional structure, such as variations in energy providers, were chosen.

Barenergy was funded by the European Commission, FP7, and conducted by a multidisciplinary team with researchers from Norway, France, Hungary, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the UK.

For more information: http://www.barenergy.eu

Publications based on this project:

De Groot, J.I.M., Steg, L., Keizer, M., Farsang, A., & Watt, A. (2012). Environmental values in post-socialist Hungary: Is it useful to distinguish egoistic, altruistic and biospheric values? Czech Sociological Review , 48 (3),421-440.

Acceptability and perceived risks and benefits of nuclear energy

This project aimed to study the acceptability of nuclear energy in the Netherlands, and the perceived risks and benefits of nuclear energy. We particularly considered how values affect the perceived risks and benefits, and which factors predict the likelihood that people engage in collective action to promote or prevent the use of nuclear energy.

Publications based on this project:

De Groot, J.I.M., Steg, L., & Poortinga, W. (2013). Values, perceived risks and benefits, and acceptability of nuclear energy. Risk Analysis, 33 (2), 307-317. DOI: 10.1111/j.1539-6924.2012.01845.x

De Groot, J.I.M., & Steg, L. (2010). Morality and nuclear energy: Perceptions of risks and benefits, personal norms and willingness to take action related to nuclear energy. Risk Analysis, 30, 1363-1373.

Pay as you drive

This project aimed to study the acceptability and effects of a pay-as-you-drive vehicle insurance from an integrated multidisciplinary perspective. The project was funded by Transumo and conducted by a multidisciplinary team of economists, psychologists, and transport researchers.

Publications based on this project:

Bolderdijk, J.W., Steg, L., Geller, E.S., Lehman, P.K., & Postmes, T. (2013). Comparing the effectiveness of monetary versus moral motives in environmental campaigning. Nature Climate Change, 3, 413-416. DOI: 10.1038/NCLIMATE1767.

Bolderdijk, J.W., Knockaert, J., Steg, E.M., & Verhoef, E.T. (2011). Effects of Pay-As-You-Drive vehicle insurance on young drivers' speed choice: Results of a Duch field experiment . Accident Analysis and Prevention, 43, 1181-1186.

Bolderdijk, J.W., Steg, L., & Postmes, T. (2013). Fostering support for work floor energy conservation policies: Accounting for privacy concerns. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 34, 195–210.

A multi-disciplinary study of pricing policies in transport - MD-PIT

This project aimed at providing a theoretical and empirical evaluation of the direct and indirect effects of practically possible transport pricing policies from a multidisciplinary perspective. The effects studied included behavioural responses and their consequences, also from a spatial and a network perspective, as well as acceptability issues of various pricing and tax recycling schemes. The evaluation included the derivation and formulation of policy implications. Specific features of the project included the focus on dynamic aspects (both short and long run), the recognition of heterogeneity (i.e. the consideration of different groups), and the explicit choice for a network and spatial perspective.

The project was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of economists, psychologists, and transport researchers and funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

For more information: http://www.feweb.vu.nl/nl/afdelingen-en-instituten/spatial-economics/i-prism/related-projects/md-pit/index.asp

Publications based on this project:

Schuitema, G., Steg, L., & Van Kruining, M. (2011). When are transport policies fair and acceptable? The role of six fairness principles. Social Justice Research, 24, 66-84.

Schuitema, G., Steg, L., & Rothengatter, J.A. (2010). Relationship between the acceptability, personal outcome expectations and the expected effects of transport pricing policies. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 30, 587-593.

Schuitema, G., Steg, L., & Forward, S. (2010).Explaining differences in acceptability before and acceptance after the implementation of a congestion charge in Stockholm. Transportation Research-A: Policy and Practice, 44, 99-109.

Schuitema, G., & Steg, L. (2010). Een psychologisch perspectief op prijsbeleid in verkeer en vervoer. Een terug- en vooruitblik na 7 jaar (A psychological perspective on pricing policies in traffic and transport. Looking back and ahead after 7 years). Tijdschrift Vervoersswetenschap (Journal of Transport Science), 46 , 122-123.

Schuitema, G., & Steg, L. (2008). The role of revenue use in the acceptability of transport pricing policies. Transportation Research F: Psychology and Behaviour, 11, 221-231.

Steg, L., Tillema, T., Van Wee, B., & Schuitema, G. (2008). Firms’ perception and acceptability of transport pricing. In: E. Verhoef, B. Van Wee, L. Steg, & M. Bliemer (Eds.), Pricing in road transport: A multi-disciplinary perspective (pp. 250-269). Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar.

Steg, L., Verhoef, E., Bliemer, M., & Van Wee, B. (2008). Introduction. In: E. Verhoef, B. Van Wee, L. Steg, & M. Bliemer (Eds.), Pricing in road transport: A multi-disciplinary perspective (pp. 1-5). Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar.

Schuitema, G., Steg, L., & Vlek, C. (2007). Are pricing policies effective to change car use? IATSS Research, 31 (1), 21-31. 

Steg, L., & Schuitema, G. (2007). Behavioural responses to transport pricing: a theoretical analysis. In: T. Gärling & L. Steg (Eds.), Threats to the quality of urban life from car traffic: problems, causes, and solutions (pp. 347-366). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Steg, L., Verhoef, E., Bliemer, M., Joksimovic, D., Schuitema, G., Tillema, T., Ubbels, B., Van Amelsfort, D., & Van Wee, B. (2006). Een multidisciplinair perspectief op prijsbeleid in verkeer en vervoer: MD PIT (A multi-disciplinary study of pricing policies in transport: MD PIT). Tijdschrift Vervoerswetenschap (Journal of Transport Science), 42 (2), 26-32.

Steg, L., & Schuitema, G. (2003). Een psychologisch perspectief op prijsbeleid in verkeer en vervoer (A psychological perspective on transport pricing). Tijdschrift Vervoerswetenschap (Journal of Transport Science), 39 (4), 23-28.

Assess implementations in the frame of the Cities-of-Tomorrow Programme

The main objective of ASI was to provide knowledge about the practice of life quality assessment by dif­ferent disciplines in connection with different types of public measures in the area of town planning and design, transportation and mobility.

The project was funded by the European Commission, FP5, and conducted by a team of researchers from Austria, the Czech Republic, Italy, Sweden, and the Netherlands.

For more information: http://www.factum.at/asi/

Publications based on this project:

De Groot, J., & Steg, L. (2008). Value orientations to explain beliefs related to environmental significant behavior: How to measure egoistic, altruistic, and biospheric value orientations. Environment and Behavior, 40 (3), 330-354.

Steg, L., & De Groot, J.I.M. (2008). Transport planning and quality of life. In: U. Becker, J. Böhmer & R. Gerike (Eds.), How to define and measure access and need satisfaction in transport (pp.79-94). Dresden: Dresder Institut für Verkehr und Umwelt e.V.

Steg, L., De Groot, J., Forward, S., Kaufmann, C., Risser, R., Schmeidler, K., Martincigh, L., & Urbani, L. (2007). Assessing life quality in transport planning and urban design: definition, operationalisation, assessment and implementation. In: S. Marshall & D. Banister (Eds.), Land use and transport. European research towards integrated policies (pp. 217-243). Amsterdam: Elsevier.

De Groot, J., & Steg, L. (2007b). Value orientations and environmental beliefs in five countries: Validity of an instrument to measure egoistic, altruistic and biospheric value orientations. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 38 (3), 318-332.

De Groot, J., & Steg, L. (2006a). Impact of transport pricing on quality of life, acceptability, and intentions to reduce car use: an explorative study in five European countries. Journal of Transport Geography, 14 (6), 463-470.

De Groot, J., & Steg, L. (2006b). The role of value orientations in evaluating quality of life consequences of a transport pricing policy. Transportation Research Part D, 11 (2), 160-165.

Reducing household energy use via tailoring

This project aimed at studying the effects of tailored information and feedack, provided by an interactive website, would be effective in realising household energy savings.

The project was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of energy scientists, computer scientists, and psychologists, and funded by the Dutch Knowledge Centre for Energy and the Environment (NOVEM).

Publications based on this project:

Abrahamse, W., & Steg, L. (2011). Factors related to household energy use and intention to reduce it: The role of psychological and socio-demographic variables. Human Ecology Review, 18 (1), 30-40.

Abrahamse, W., Steg, L., Vlek, Ch., Rothengatter, T. (2005). A review of intervention studies aimed at household energy conservation. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 25, 273-291.

Promoting household energy savings: The influence of information, feedback and commitment on household energy use

This projected was aimed at studying the effect of information, feedback and commitment on household energy savings, psychological backgrounds, and individual quality of life.

The project was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of energy scientists, computer scientists, and psychologists, and funded by the Dutch Knowledge Centre for Energy and the Environment (NOVEM).

Publications based on this project:

Abrahamse, W., & Steg, L. (2009). How do socio-demographic and psychological factors relate to households' direct and indirect energy use and savings? Journal of Economic Psychology, 30, 711-720.

Abrahamse, W., Steg, L., Vlek, Ch., Rothengatter, T. (2007). The effect of tailored information, goal setting and tailored feedback on household energy use, energy-related behaviors and behavioral antecedents. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 27, 265-276.

Symbolic and affective motives for car use

Three successive research aimed at studying the significance of symbolic and affective motives for car use. The projects were funded by the Transport Research Centre of the Dutch Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management and by the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment.

Publications based on this project:

Steg, L. (2005). Car use: lust and must. Instrumental, symbolic and affective motives for car use. Transportation Research-A, 39 (2-3), 147-162.

Steg, L. (2004). Car use: lust and must. In: T. Rothengatter & R.D. Huguenin (Eds.), Traffic and transport psychology: theory and application (pp. 443-452) Amsterdam: Elsevier.

Steg, L., Vlek, C., & Slotegraaf, G. (2001). Instrumental-reasoned and symbolic-affective motives for using a motor car. Transportation Research-F: Psychology and Behaviour, 4 (3), 151-169.

Steg, L., & Vlek, C. (1999). Autogebruik: must en lust. Instrumentele en affectieve motieven voor autogebruik (Car use: must and lust. Instrumental and affective motives for car use). Tijdschrift Vervoerswetenschap (Journal of Transport Science), 4 , 303-322. 

 

 

Radio 

 

Laatst gewijzigd:13 juli 2017 17:46

Contactgegevens

Psychologie

Kamer:
Heijmans 462
Telefoon: