Publication

Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals

Slofstra, C., Nauta, M. H., Holmes, E. A., Bos, E. H., Wichers, M., Batalas, N., Klein, N. S. & Bockting, C. L. H. 17-Aug-2017 In : Cognition & emotion. p. 1-8 8 p.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewArticle

APA

Slofstra, C., Nauta, M. H., Holmes, E. A., Bos, E. H., Wichers, M., Batalas, N., ... Bockting, C. L. H. (2017). Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals. Cognition & emotion, 1-8. DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2017.1365047

Author

Slofstra, Christien; Nauta, Maaike H; Holmes, Emily A; Bos, Elisabeth H; Wichers, Marieke; Batalas, Nikolaos; Klein, Nicola S; Bockting, Claudi L H / Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals.

In: Cognition & emotion, 17.08.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewArticle

Harvard

Slofstra, C, Nauta, MH, Holmes, EA, Bos, EH, Wichers, M, Batalas, N, Klein, NS & Bockting, CLH 2017, 'Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals' Cognition & emotion, pp. 1-8. DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2017.1365047

Standard

Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals. / Slofstra, Christien; Nauta, Maaike H; Holmes, Emily A; Bos, Elisabeth H; Wichers, Marieke; Batalas, Nikolaos; Klein, Nicola S; Bockting, Claudi L H.

In: Cognition & emotion, 17.08.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewArticle

Vancouver

Slofstra C, Nauta MH, Holmes EA, Bos EH, Wichers M, Batalas N et al. Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals. Cognition & emotion. 2017 Aug 17;1-8. Available from, DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2017.1365047


BibTeX

@article{157078c602ee4793a9ee08934391c2eb,
title = "Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals",
abstract = "Previously depressed individuals experience disturbances in affect. Affective disturbances may be related to visual mental imagery, given that imagery-based processing of emotional stimuli causes stronger affective responses than verbal processing in experimental laboratory studies. However, the role of imagery-based processing in everyday life is unknown. This study assessed mental imagery in the daily life of previously and never depressed individuals. Higher levels of visual mental imagery was hypothesised to be associated with more affective reactivity to both negatively and positively valenced mental representations. This study was the first to explore mental imagery in daily life using experience sampling methodology. Previously depressed (n = 10) and matched never depressed (n = 11) individuals participated in this study. Momentary affect and imagery-based processing were assessed using the {"}Imagine your mood{"} smartphone application. Participants recorded on average 136 momentary reports over a period of 8 weeks. The expected association between visual mental imagery and affective reactivity was not found. Unexpectedly, in both previously and never depressed individuals, higher levels of imagery-based processing of mental representations in daily life were significantly associated with better momentary mood and more positive affect, regardless of valence. The causality of effects remains to be examined in future studies.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Christien Slofstra and Nauta, {Maaike H} and Holmes, {Emily A} and Bos, {Elisabeth H} and Marieke Wichers and Nikolaos Batalas and Klein, {Nicola S} and Bockting, {Claudi L H}",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1080/02699931.2017.1365047",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Cognition & emotion",
issn = "0269-9931",
publisher = "ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring the relation between visual mental imagery and affect in the daily life of previously depressed and never depressed individuals

AU - Slofstra,Christien

AU - Nauta,Maaike H

AU - Holmes,Emily A

AU - Bos,Elisabeth H

AU - Wichers,Marieke

AU - Batalas,Nikolaos

AU - Klein,Nicola S

AU - Bockting,Claudi L H

PY - 2017/8/17

Y1 - 2017/8/17

N2 - Previously depressed individuals experience disturbances in affect. Affective disturbances may be related to visual mental imagery, given that imagery-based processing of emotional stimuli causes stronger affective responses than verbal processing in experimental laboratory studies. However, the role of imagery-based processing in everyday life is unknown. This study assessed mental imagery in the daily life of previously and never depressed individuals. Higher levels of visual mental imagery was hypothesised to be associated with more affective reactivity to both negatively and positively valenced mental representations. This study was the first to explore mental imagery in daily life using experience sampling methodology. Previously depressed (n = 10) and matched never depressed (n = 11) individuals participated in this study. Momentary affect and imagery-based processing were assessed using the "Imagine your mood" smartphone application. Participants recorded on average 136 momentary reports over a period of 8 weeks. The expected association between visual mental imagery and affective reactivity was not found. Unexpectedly, in both previously and never depressed individuals, higher levels of imagery-based processing of mental representations in daily life were significantly associated with better momentary mood and more positive affect, regardless of valence. The causality of effects remains to be examined in future studies.

AB - Previously depressed individuals experience disturbances in affect. Affective disturbances may be related to visual mental imagery, given that imagery-based processing of emotional stimuli causes stronger affective responses than verbal processing in experimental laboratory studies. However, the role of imagery-based processing in everyday life is unknown. This study assessed mental imagery in the daily life of previously and never depressed individuals. Higher levels of visual mental imagery was hypothesised to be associated with more affective reactivity to both negatively and positively valenced mental representations. This study was the first to explore mental imagery in daily life using experience sampling methodology. Previously depressed (n = 10) and matched never depressed (n = 11) individuals participated in this study. Momentary affect and imagery-based processing were assessed using the "Imagine your mood" smartphone application. Participants recorded on average 136 momentary reports over a period of 8 weeks. The expected association between visual mental imagery and affective reactivity was not found. Unexpectedly, in both previously and never depressed individuals, higher levels of imagery-based processing of mental representations in daily life were significantly associated with better momentary mood and more positive affect, regardless of valence. The causality of effects remains to be examined in future studies.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1080/02699931.2017.1365047

DO - 10.1080/02699931.2017.1365047

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Cognition & emotion

T2 - Cognition & emotion

JF - Cognition & emotion

SN - 0269-9931

ER -

ID: 47159015