Publication

A multi-site study on medical school selection, performance, motivation and engagement

Wouters, A., Croiset, G., Schripsema, N. R., Cohen-Schotanus, J., Spaai, G. W. G., Hulsman, R. L. & Kusurkar, R. A. May-2017 In : Advances in Health Sciences Education. 22, 2, p. 447-462 16 p.

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewArticle

Medical schools seek ways to improve their admissions strategies, since the available methods prove to be suboptimal for selecting the best and most motivated students. In this multi-site cross-sectional questionnaire study, we examined the value of (different) selection procedures compared to a weighted lottery procedure, which includes direct admission based on top pre-university grade point averages (ae8 out of 10; top-pu-GPA). We also considered whether students had participated in selection, prior to being admitted through weighted lottery. Year-1 (pre-clinical) and Year-4 (clinical) students completed standard validated questionnaires measuring quality of motivation (Academic Self-regulation Questionnaire), strength of motivation (Strength of Motivation for Medical School-Revised) and engagement (Utrecht Work Engagement Scale-Student). Performance data comprised GPA and course credits in Year-1 and clerkship performance in Year-4. Regression analyses were performed. The response rate was 35% (387 Year-1 and 273 Year-4 students). Top-pu-GPA students outperformed selected students. Selected Year-1 students reported higher strength of motivation than top-pu-GPA students. Selected students did not outperform or show better quality of motivation and engagement than lottery-admitted students. Participation in selection was associated with higher engagement and better clerkship performance in Year-4. GPA, course credits and strength of motivation in Year-1 differed between students admitted through different selection procedures. Top-pu-GPA students perform best in the medical study. The few and small differences found raise questions about the added value of an extensive selection procedure compared to a weighted lottery procedure. Findings have to be interpreted with caution because of a low response rate and small group sizes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-462
Number of pages16
JournalAdvances in Health Sciences Education
Volume22
Issue number2
StatePublished - May-2017

    Keywords

  • Academic performance, Admissions, Engagement, Medical school, Medical students, Motivation, Selection, Self-determination theory, STUDENTS, EDUCATION, APPLICANTS, CLERKSHIPS, ADMISSIONS, BURNOUT

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