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Evidence-Based Education

How can we use research evidence to inform educational practice? What factors at the macro, meso and micro levels of the educational system determine the success of educational interventions?

The Master's track 'Evidence-Based Education' aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of how educational research can contribute to the development of effective educational innovations and to the improvement of the quality of education. We strive for education that promotes the academic, meta-cognitive, socio-emotional and behavioral outcomes of all students, regardless of their background characteristics and learning abilities. Stable educational improvement can only occur if there is a solid knowledge base to feed educational practice, from macro (e.g., policy), meso (e.g., school organization) to micro levels (e.g., classroom processes). Bridging the gap between research and educational practice requires graduates that can understand, assess and generate solid evidence, and can translate these insights into educational initiatives that are fully responsive to the societal issues and contexts in which they are embedded.

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How can we use research evidence to inform educational practice? What factors at the macro, meso and micro levels of the educational system determine the success of educational interventions?

The Master's track 'Evidence-Based Education' aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of how educational research can contribute to the development of effective educational innovations and to the improvement of the quality of education. We strive for education that promotes the academic, meta-cognitive, socio-emotional and behavioral outcomes of all students, regardless of their background characteristics and learning abilities. Stable educational improvement can only occur if there is a solid knowledge base to feed educational practice, from macro (e.g., policy), meso (e.g., school organization) to micro levels (e.g., classroom processes). Bridging the gap between research and educational practice requires graduates that can understand, assess and generate solid evidence, and can translate these insights into educational initiatives that are fully responsive to the societal issues and contexts in which they are embedded.

More about this programme
  • Testimonial of

    We have the strong belief that education has the power to transform lives

  • Testimonial of Elene Romelashvili

    I still teach at the international school and I work for the government, for a department at the Ministry of Justice that works on the development and improvement of public services in Georgia.

    I did my Bachelor's in Applied Math in Georgia, my home country. For my Master's, also in Applied Math, I went to the US. During this Master's I had my first teaching experience. I taught undergraduate students as a Teaching Assistant. That was when I discovered that I liked teaching.

    After my Master's, I returned to Georgia and became a teacher at a British international school in Tbilisi, where I taught mathematics and economics. I enjoyed teaching but I wanted to learn more about education, for example about student motivation, learning methods and educational effectiveness. After five years, I decided to go to Groningen to do the Master's Programme ' Evidence Based Education'.

    In my Master's programme, I particularly liked doing research. My master's thesis was about teacher effectiveness, and I found working on it a great experience. Amongst the courses I took, I found the course about learning problems very useful, because inclusive education in Georgia is not well developed.

    Education in the Netherlands is quite different from education in Georgia. In the Netherlands all universities are leading research universities, so all professors are also leading researchers. In Georgia, the government does not fund research, so the universities are only oriented on teaching. Since professors do not conduct research, they are less aware of major developments in their field, which I think is important, especially in the social sciences.
     
    I now live in Tbilisi, where I have two jobs. I still teach at the international school and I work for the government, for a department at the Ministry of Justice that works on the development and
    improvement of public services in Georgia. I use the research and writing skills that I developed in Groningen a lot.

    I would recommend this Master's programme to anyone interested in educational research. It is very intensive since it is only one year and there are a lot of courses you need to take and a lot of deadlines you have to meet, but it gives you the opportunity to accomplish a lot in a short period of time. Studying in Groningen is really great. It is a fantastic city. Even the weather was not as bad as advertised, at least not in the year I was there.

    Close
    – Elene Romelashvili
  • Testimonial of Ning Ding

    I now work at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences, where I teach business research methods and statistics.

    I started my 'International Master in Education' degree programme (now called 'Evidence Based Education') in 2003. I had already received my bachelor's degree in 'History Education in China' and studied 'Adult Education' in Germany. But before I started my Master's at the University of Groningen, I had only learned how to be a qualified teacher.

    During the master's programme, I learned how to conduct educational research. I enjoyed that so much that I decided to stay at the RUG for a PhD, and I followed a very interesting course about how to use computers in teaching. I found it inspiring and my PhD focused on this topic. I investigated how to use computers to facilitate students' communication and collaboration. After my PhD, I continued as a post-doc researcher, also in the context of educational technology.

    Upon my arrival in Groningen, I assumed the lectures would be the same as in Germany, where I only had lectures, no seminars, and where there wasn't much communication between the teacher and the student. To my surprise, I found out that it was quite different here, and that the Dutch teachers are actually very communicative and friendly. I enjoyed going to class. The master courses have definitely laid a solid basis for my career as a researcher and university lecturer. The research methods I learned from this programme are also still very useful.

    I now work at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences, where I teach business research methods and statistics. I really enjoy it because I can teach a lot more than during my post-doc, where I only taught a few classes and I didn't have much contact with my students. Also, when I published research articles I tended to think: who will read them? Now, at the Hanze I can directly apply my research findings into my teaching and share my findings with my colleagues.

    In 2014, I was the instructional designer of the first MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) of the Hanze University. It was the first MOOC of a Dutch HBO Institute about economics. Till now, we've ran this MOOC four times, and we have reached students all over the world. This is a good example of something that I used to do research on and which I now apply in practice.

    Close
    – Ning Ding
Facts & Figures
Degree
MSc in Educational Sciences
Croho code
66613
Course type
Master
Language of instruction
English (100%)
Duration
12 months (60 ECTS)
Start
SeptemberSeptember
Programme form
full-time
Faculty
Behavioural and Social Sciences